Re: Brinkerhoff Prelim


Mike Perry
 

Very interesting post, Gary.

Possibly related to this is advice from an old newsletter: Trim the Q
to fly 10-12 mph faster than pitch-buck, keep that speed on final and
use that speed (energy) in order to flare.

Also, someone once told me, if you are high on final you can increase
your decent rate by pulling back on the stick to close to pitch-buck,
hold that speed until you are back on glide-slope, then release the back
pressure. (obviously, not too close to the ground, and not until you
know your airplane well.)

Mike Perry

On 10/19/2011 1:19 AM, Gary McKirdy wrote:

Great timely post Bruce.

Something I demonstrate to the new Qbies I fly with is the speed bleeding
back slowly on finals death trap.

By accident or pilot input it is a fact that the nearer to pitch buck
speed
you get the more the nose needs to be firmly held up with elevator
especially after bringing the power back. This can easily be trimmed out
with reflexor but the nose will still drop as you slow further.

If you are high and slowing gradually, the picture out front begins to
look
more like a conventional approach in a normal aircraft. You even get the
benefit of being able to see the runway over the nose better so all good
right?

Because the forward speed is still relatively high compared to what
you flew
before you may not notice the descent rate starting to build to match.

I can demonstrate 1500ft per minute in a GU Q and less but still 1000
ft ish
per minute in an LS1 or Waddelow.

THE POINT IS IT STILL ALL LOOKS AND FEELS PERFECTLY NORMAL.

So you are now on the back of the drag curve but the fuselage waterline is
near horizontal whilst the real angle of attack might be 10-16 degrees.

Who would of guessed that if you don't now add full power by 250ft AGL in
some Q's you may already have left it too late.

If you left it to 150ft AGL you will impact within 6-8 seconds
regardless of
what power you now set.

That may not be on the airfield!

Remember you had to be able to accelerate to be able to pull more than 1 G
just to turn the flight path back to horizontal to flare.

IF IT IS ALREADY TOO LATE THERE IS NO RECOVERY!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

I say again;

IF IT IS ALREADY TOO LATE THERE IS NO RECOVERY!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Whilst this back of the drag curve trap is true of all aircraft to some
degree, with 55sq feet of wing area to arrest any rate of descent
takes much
more time and power and height than the new wannabe test pilot has any
right
to know about from the P.O.H.

If anyone wants to explore this make absolutely sure you do it at a safe
height first where you need to focus acutely on the ASI and altimeter and
VSI if you have one and on an approach to see the ground rush
initially have
an extra 500ft more than you thought you needed.

I give an extreme exaple to demonstrate a very important trap for the
unwary. It still applies in some measure to correct any descent to be able
to flare so YOU MUST ALWAYS BE READY TO USE THE THROTTLE EARLY TO CONTROL
DESCENT PATH.

But what if it does not respond?

That is why you want the maximum excess runway length possible for testing
like Bruce rightly says. It is so you can abort the take off safely and
glide in with a stopped prop.

TO NOT USE THE BIGGEST RUNWAY AVAILABLE IS TO HAVE FAILED TO PLAN AND
PLANNED TO FAIL.

IN SO DOING YOU LET DOWN THE ENTIRE WORLD Q COMMUNITY WHO HELPED YOU GET
THERE.

Regards
Gary

On Wed, Oct 19, 2011 at 5:03 AM, jcrain2@...
<mailto:jcrain2%40juno.com> <jcrain2@...
<mailto:jcrain2%40juno.com>> wrote:

**


I realize that it is to early to know what happened to Jerry. I am not
trying to answer that question. I see a commonality in 2 different
Quickie
aircraft crashes though. The 1st is the crash in California of Phil
Lankford's Q200. Phil knows all of this from past talks with him.
And the
2nd is of course Jerry's crash. Both of the crashes came up short of the
runway on landing. With this in mind I would like to reiterate a
couple of
things that I have already said to the group.1. Find a loooong
runway to use
for 1st flights. (6000+ would be great)2. Every landing should be
treated as
an engine out. Don't make a loooog down wind just because it makes
you feel
like you need time to "line her up" perfectly. (I have about 800+
hrs in a
Quickie and I try to do that every landing as much as I can). With a
73 mph
stall speed the descent rate is going to be high (remember what
Jimmeh has
always said "it is a high performance" fast airplane.) If you come in to
high just side slip and she will come down quickly but leave a lot
of runway
behind you when you land. That's the reason for a long runway. You
don't and
shouldn't try to put this airplane on the numbers especially at
first. Turn
base to final quickly as though you are fighting for your life to
make it to
the runway! I am also offering a 3rd point that may or may not have been
involved with Jerry's accident. That is "throttle slamming". When
you are
landing and see that you are coming up short, make a decision early
and feed
in throttle slowly. Seems I read that in the POH of an airplane or some
periodical somewhere that if you "slam the throttle to quickly it will
stumble and maybe not recover." If it stumbles a lot take out the
carb heat
on final that may help. Try throttle slamming, stopped from a slow idle,
some time at the end of the runway on the ground and see what happens
without taking off. You elected to be the test pilot. Give yourself a
fighting chance every take off and landing. Leave your self an out
should
something not go right. Stay tight with the runway. Your first flights
should always be close enough to the runway to make it home safe. Slow
flight and testing should be directly over the runway at an altitude
that
keeps you out of the way of other aircraft and will produce a glide
back to
the runway. Bruce
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