Date   

Re: bigger rudder or not?/Larry

One Sky Dog
 

In a message dated 11/25/2004 10:34:52 AM Mountain Standard Time,
larry2@... writes:

Sounds like an invite Larry.

Doug "Hawkeye" Humble
Yes, it does. But, no contact info.


Larry Severson
Fountain Valley, CA 92708
(714) 968-9852
larry2@...
So E-mail him direct!

Regards

One Sky Dog


Re: one question

One Sky Dog
 

In a message dated 11/25/2004 10:30:33 AM Mountain Standard Time,
larry2@... writes:
Control was more important to the designer than speed. The Dragonfly has
more wing area, a larger tail, and fuselage mounted gear to make it easier
to fly. It is also a lot slower.

Larry Severson
Fountain Valley, CA 92708
(714) 968-9852
larry2@...
Larry, I would not say a lot slower. It is slower but if you match VW engines
to VW engines they are pretty even. There is 1 200 mph Dragonfly called
Expresso. Put a O-200 or equivalent 100 hp engine on a Dragonfly and they perk
right up.

The Dragonfly came before the Q2 in the design emergance linage of these
machines. The designer put tip gear on the Dragonfly gear mods came later and most
of them are not blessed by anyone except the particular gear designer.

Dragonfly MK-II 1835cc VW with total time 750 hrs, 450 put on by me between
West Coast and IL and MO.

Working on a 100 hp Dragonfly.

Regards,

One Sky Dog

Charlie Johnson Ogden UT 4430 msl


Re: bigger rudder Design

Terry Crouch
 

There are many considerations that go into the design of a control surface,
slight changes in shape, weight, balance, mounting, stiffness, etc., sometimes
have catastrophic results.

Some very interesting reading can be found on Rutans web site under elevators

Terry Crouch
Quickie N14TC


Re: Help for new Q-200 pilot/owner

britmcman99
 

Hello Bruce:

I am definitely up for a trip. I imagine I will make Sullivan or Osh or one
of those nice events next year and will get a chance to visit on the way.
Our new friend Kevin F. surmised that I had an accent. He spent some time in
Tulsa and Shawnee Oklahoma, so when he gets that yellow thing of his all
sorted out we'll have to have our own "Okie" fly-in. I'll have to start looking
for a mattress that I can tie on top of the airplane for the trip out.

Cheers,

Phil Lankford
N870BM


Re: one question

Paul Spackman
 

Can't speak for QAC but in the design stage rudders are sized using
the wing area and the cord. Sure would be interesting to see just how
the Q's size up. Any thoughts David G.? Another question might be
when does the rudder/VS stop flying or stall? What airfoil(s) are
the larger tails using?
Hey, Happy Thanksgiving. Think I'll go fly all these thoughts out of
my head when the sun shines on the Rockies. Keep building big tail
or small it's a great little airplane!!!

Paul Spackman

-- In Q-LIST@..., "James Postma" <james@p...> wrote:
One question that has never been asked or answered is why did QAC
use such a small rudder? Anybody know?

Every other taildragger I have ever seen has a huge rudder for
ground control.

James Postma
Q2 Revmaster N145EX
Q200 N8427
Steilacoom, Washington
(253) 584-1182 9:00 to 8:00 PDT
May your header tank be always full and your wings right side up.



one question

James Postma <james@...>
 

One question that has never been asked or answered is why did QAC use such a small rudder? Anybody know?

Every other taildragger I have ever seen has a huge rudder for ground control.

James Postma
Q2 Revmaster N145EX
Q200 N8427
Steilacoom, Washington
(253) 584-1182 9:00 to 8:00 PDT
May your header tank be always full and your wings right side up.


Re: Ground Control

John ten Have <Jtenhave@...>
 

James,

if this is the case there is something wrong with your aircraft, c of g, rigging, relative aoa of flying surfaces or something else related to handling. It has been said before but you should never be in the condition where you are wheeling it on. You are, to be specific, mishandling the aircraft and will receive no medals for discovering that a mishandled aircraft will bite you. Listen to the high hour guys, James and hear.

John

----- Original Message -----
From: James Postma
To: Q-LIST@...
Sent: Thursday, November 25, 2004 4:55 PM
Subject: Re: [Q-LIST] Ground Control


I repeat. The standard rudder is ineffective on the ground. Do not count
on it to do anything if your tailspring breaks. No theory here. Just many
results.

My first introduction to this phenomena was my test pilot before I flew. He
had the reflexor down and could not get the tail on the ground. He had the
rudder full over because of a small crosswind. When the tail came down,
there was an immediate ground loop. There are two other results on this
list in the last two months. Please read them.

James Postma
Q2 Revmaster N145EX
Q200 N8427
Steilacoom, Washington
(253) 584-1182 9:00 to 8:00 PDT
May your header tank be always full and your wings right side up.

----- Original Message -----
From: <britmcman@...>
To: <Q-LIST@...>
Sent: Wednesday, November 24, 2004 5:18 PM
Subject: Re: [Q-LIST] Ground Control


>
>
> In a message dated 11/24/04 10:06:21 A.M. Pacific Standard Time,
> james@... writes:
>
> A bell crank with separate wires for the tailwheel and rudder is part of
the
> JB 6 pack. This enables the use of springs for the tailwheel to soften
it's
> effect. It also enables control of the rudder should the tailspring
break.
> This will not be very effective with the standard rudder
>
>
> Say again Jim P.?
>
> JB 6 Pack very effective with the STANDARD RUDDER.
>
> Phil Lankford
> N870BM
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> Quickie Builders Association WEB site
> http://www.quickiebuilders.org
>
>
> Yahoo! Groups Links
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>



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Re: bigger rudder or not?/Larry

Larry Severson
 

Come on out and check it out.

Paul Spackman
I would if I could, but it seems that I am the only one on this net who identifies his location.


Larry Severson
Fountain Valley, CA 92708
(714) 968-9852
larry2@...


Re: Ground Control

James Postma <james@...>
 

I repeat. The standard rudder is ineffective on the ground. Do not count
on it to do anything if your tailspring breaks. No theory here. Just many
results.

My first introduction to this phenomena was my test pilot before I flew. He
had the reflexor down and could not get the tail on the ground. He had the
rudder full over because of a small crosswind. When the tail came down,
there was an immediate ground loop. There are two other results on this
list in the last two months. Please read them.

James Postma
Q2 Revmaster N145EX
Q200 N8427
Steilacoom, Washington
(253) 584-1182 9:00 to 8:00 PDT
May your header tank be always full and your wings right side up.

----- Original Message -----
From: <britmcman@...>
To: <Q-LIST@...>
Sent: Wednesday, November 24, 2004 5:18 PM
Subject: Re: [Q-LIST] Ground Control




In a message dated 11/24/04 10:06:21 A.M. Pacific Standard Time,
james@... writes:

A bell crank with separate wires for the tailwheel and rudder is part of
the
JB 6 pack. This enables the use of springs for the tailwheel to soften
it's
effect. It also enables control of the rudder should the tailspring
break.
This will not be very effective with the standard rudder


Say again Jim P.?

JB 6 Pack very effective with the STANDARD RUDDER.

Phil Lankford
N870BM







Quickie Builders Association WEB site
http://www.quickiebuilders.org


Yahoo! Groups Links








Re: Ground Control

James Postma <james@...>
 

What does it do?

James Postma
Q2 Revmaster N145EX
Q200 N8427
Steilacoom, Washington
(253) 584-1182 9:00 to 8:00 PDT
May your header tank be always full and your wings right side up.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Tri-Q1" <rryan@...>
To: <Q-LIST@...>
Sent: Wednesday, November 24, 2004 7:39 PM
Subject: [Q-LIST] Re: Ground Control




James,

How about a taxi TEST of your Q's large rudder using a free
swivelling tail wheel.

Ryan

--- In Q-LIST@..., "James Postma" <james@p...> wrote:
This mail discusses control and not stability. Various fixes for
the stability problem exist.

I have been doing some tests with various control techniques and
can summarize as follows.

Elevator.
Elevator back helps tracking before lift off during take off roll.
The stick should be eased forward after lift off and let the
elevator trim prevail.
When landing. Immediately after touch down, elevator forward spoils
lift on the canard and helps to keep the main wheels on the ground
and reduce bouncing.
After touchdown is assured, elevator back helps tracking .

Elevator trim.
Should be set, as part of the take off check list, for the desired
climb speed after lift off.
Should be set for the desired approach speed during landing
approach.

Reflexor.
Reflexor back helps tracking before lift off.
As the canard lifts off, moving the reflexor forward will create
more lift on the wing and help improve climb rate.
During approach, reflexor should be set to allow good vision of the
runway and enable a three point landing. This was the original
reason for the reflexor.
Reflexor back helps tracking after touchdown.

Aileron.
Reverse aileron steering (adverse yaw) becomes very effective on
the ground as speed is increased. There is very little adverse yaw
in-flight.
The stick should be centered at all times during ground operations
unless you are intentionally using this control.

Rudder pedals.
Driving the tail wheel is very effective when the tailwheel is on
the ground.
Some pilots report improved operation with the soft rubber tire and
some like the pneumatic tire. I have not tested either one. I think
the soft rubber is preferred. With the Air Products wheel, the tail
is raised and you can see the runway during take off roll.
The large tailwheel with springs is part of the JB 6 pack and has
many adherents. I have not tested it.
A bell crank with separate wires for the tailwheel and rudder is
part of the JB 6 pack. This enables the use of springs for the
tailwheel to soften it's effect. It also enables control of the
rudder should the tailspring break. This will not be very effective
with the standard rudder.

The standard rudder is not very effective during any ground
operation. If the tail wheel comes off the ground, control must be
switched to other than the rudder petals (toe brakes or aileron).
This is difficult to do and has caused many incidents. The standard
rudder is good for any in-flight operations.
The Frank Follmer rudder is very effective during all ground
operations so that one need not be concerned if the tail wheel lifts
off.
The FF rudder is not much more work if you have not built your fin
and rudder. Frank is no longer with us and I am looking into the
build data. It is very similar to the Dragonfly rudder. I think
Frank copied it and added a larger aerodynamic tab. When he
converted my fin and rudder to the FF, he kept the existing fin, cut
it to take the new rudder, made the rudder from scratch, kept the
existing two rudder hinges and added a third hinge above the other
two.

Toe brakes.
Are part of the JB 6 pack. I have not tested it. Adherents
believe it is a suitable alternative to a larger rudder.
There are some adherents of differential hand braking. This is
very easy to do with the addition of another master cylinder side-by-
side with the existing one.

It seems that we have a rather complex airplane. It's not your
father's Cessna.
We are making it better and I think we can do more. When I first
started with mine, I was riding along hoping that a disaster would
not happen. Now I feel like I am in control. I can operate out of a
60 X 2000 foot runway and think I can get it down to 40 X 1500.

Hope this helps.


James Postma
Q2 Revmaster N145EX
Q200 N8427
Steilacoom, Washington
(253) 584-1182 9:00 to 8:00 PDT
May your header tank be always full and your wings right side up.







Quickie Builders Association WEB site
http://www.quickiebuilders.org


Yahoo! Groups Links








Re: Help for new Q-200 pilot/owner

Bruce Crain
 

Phil so they named the engine after a boxing kangaroo!?
Come out and see us. "Honey Lamb" says hi. Just weekends and holidays eh? That will keep you from getting so many hours on the Q. Then when you retire there will be lots of "goodie" still left.
Bruce

-- britmcman@... wrote:


Bruce:

You mean to say its pronounced like "Jab" as in"Poke At", and "Roo" as in
"Kangaroo"? "Jab" a "Roo?" "Jabaroo!. Guess that's easier to say than
"PokaMarsupial."

The plane is doing well, little rudder and all. I got to put about 50 hours
on it this summer with my time off, but recently picked up another job. I
might be restricted to flying weekends and holidays from here on out. Maybe
I could plan a trip out to Enid, OK. I wanna try of Honey Lamb's cooking.
Hello Honey Lamb.

Cheers,

Phil Lankford
N870BM







Quickie Builders Association WEB site
http://www.quickiebuilders.org


Yahoo! Groups Links






________________________________________________________________
Juno Platinum $9.95. Juno SpeedBand $14.95.
Sign up for Juno Today at http://www.juno.com!
Look for special offers at Best Buy stores.


Re: Ground Control

James Postma <james@...>
 

Peter,

You say was based. Are you flying now?

James Postma
Q2 Revmaster N145EX
Q200 N8427
Steilacoom, Washington
(253) 584-1182 9:00 to 8:00 PDT
May your header tank be always full and your wings right side up.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Peter Harris" <peterjfharris@...>
To: <Q-LIST@...>
Sent: Monday, November 22, 2004 9:41 AM
Subject: Re: [Q-LIST] Ground Control



James,
Kevin and Sam have both said it . In fact there is a a human nature
egofailing which we all share making it easier to blame and change the plane
rather than admit to a need to learn how to manage this great funbird.Some
of the changes that are being discussed I believe are definitely not
needed.I need to say something about the rudder.

Re the rudder: I have no problem keeping the tailwheel planted. When the
canard is stalled it will stay down and this is covered in the POH . When
the stick is held back the tailwheel will stay down provided you do not hit
the brakes too hard. I have no reflexor, no Gall steering mod, no dual
brakes , no bellcrank or split rudder/tailwheel cables.I was based on a
gravel airstrip at Noosa, 2500ft x 30ft wide with drainage canals running
full length each side 40yds from the centreline, a lake at one end and trees
and displaced threshold at the other. I would describe the rudder action in
flight as potentially savage, (Sam said sensitive, I have big feet). IMO the
larger rudder is truly not required. I do have a pneumatic tailwheel and the
vertical tailwheel pivot and would recommend the pneumatic tyre or soft
rubber.

Peter
VHONQ 300hrs

----- Original Message -----
From: James Postma
To: Q-LIST@...
Sent: Thursday, November 25, 2004 3:12 AM
Subject: [Q-LIST] Ground Control


This mail discusses control and not stability. Various fixes for the
stability problem exist.

I have been doing some tests with various control techniques and can
summarize as follows.

Elevator.
Elevator back helps tracking before lift off during take off roll.
The stick should be eased forward after lift off and let the elevator
trim prevail.
When landing. Immediately after touch down, elevator forward spoils lift
on the canard and helps to keep the main wheels on the ground and reduce
bouncing.
After touchdown is assured, elevator back helps tracking .

Elevator trim.
Should be set, as part of the take off check list, for the desired climb
speed after lift off.
Should be set for the desired approach speed during landing approach.

Reflexor.
Reflexor back helps tracking before lift off.
As the canard lifts off, moving the reflexor forward will create more
lift on the wing and help improve climb rate.
During approach, reflexor should be set to allow good vision of the
runway and enable a three point landing. This was the original reason for
the reflexor.
Reflexor back helps tracking after touchdown.

Aileron.
Reverse aileron steering (adverse yaw) becomes very effective on the
ground as speed is increased. There is very little adverse yaw in-flight.
The stick should be centered at all times during ground operations
unless you are intentionally using this control.

Rudder pedals.
Driving the tail wheel is very effective when the tailwheel is on the
ground.
Some pilots report improved operation with the soft rubber tire and some
like the pneumatic tire. I have not tested either one. I think the soft
rubber is preferred. With the Air Products wheel, the tail is raised and
you can see the runway during take off roll.
The large tailwheel with springs is part of the JB 6 pack and has many
adherents. I have not tested it.
A bell crank with separate wires for the tailwheel and rudder is part of
the JB 6 pack. This enables the use of springs for the tailwheel to soften
it's effect. It also enables control of the rudder should the tailspring
break. This will not be very effective with the standard rudder.

The standard rudder is not very effective during any ground operation.
If the tail wheel comes off the ground, control must be switched to other
than the rudder petals (toe brakes or aileron). This is difficult to do and
has caused many incidents. The standard rudder is good for any in-flight
operations.
The Frank Follmer rudder is very effective during all ground operations
so that one need not be concerned if the tail wheel lifts off.
The FF rudder is not much more work if you have not built your fin and
rudder. Frank is no longer with us and I am looking into the build data. It
is very similar to the Dragonfly rudder. I think Frank copied it and added
a larger aerodynamic tab. When he converted my fin and rudder to the FF, he
kept the existing fin, cut it to take the new rudder, made the rudder from
scratch, kept the existing two rudder hinges and added a third hinge above
the other two.

Toe brakes.
Are part of the JB 6 pack. I have not tested it. Adherents believe it
is a suitable alternative to a larger rudder.
There are some adherents of differential hand braking. This is very
easy to do with the addition of another master cylinder side-by-side with
the existing one.

It seems that we have a rather complex airplane. It's not your father's
Cessna.
We are making it better and I think we can do more. When I first
started with mine, I was riding along hoping that a disaster would not
happen. Now I feel like I am in control. I can operate out of a 60 X 2000
foot runway and think I can get it down to 40 X 1500.

Hope this helps.


James Postma
Q2 Revmaster N145EX
Q200 N8427
Steilacoom, Washington
(253) 584-1182 9:00 to 8:00 PDT
May your header tank be always full and your wings right side up.






Quickie Builders Association WEB site
http://www.quickiebuilders.org




Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
ADVERTISEMENT





--------------------------------------------------------------------------
----
Yahoo! Groups Links

a.. To visit your group on the web, go to:
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Q-LIST/

b.. To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
Q-LIST-unsubscribe@...

c.. Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of
Service.








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http://www.quickiebuilders.org


Yahoo! Groups Links








Re: bigger rudder or not?/Larry

Paul Spackman
 

Larry,

I can't speak for your plane but I use a standard taildragger main
gear takeoff quite often, picking up the tail at 40 kts and the
authority is max--a tiny tap and you are headed that way now! Hope
you get your's figured out. Low tire pressure makes this little bird
really twitchy. Come on out and check it out.

Paul Spackman

--- In Q-LIST@..., larry severson <larry2@s...> wrote:

Terry & group,

I have a Q1 that is now a Tri-Q1.

I get rudder steering, at 18-20 mph IAS on the ground with the
standard rudder. I don't need brakes to TAXI after that.

Ryan N-2XV
The Q2/Q200, on the other hand, has no rudder steering below ~70MPH!


Larry Severson
Fountain Valley, CA 92708
(714) 968-9852
larry2@s...


Re: Ground Control

Tri-Q1 <rryan@...>
 

James,

How about a taxi TEST of your Q's large rudder using a free
swivelling tail wheel.

Ryan

--- In Q-LIST@..., "James Postma" <james@p...> wrote:
This mail discusses control and not stability. Various fixes for
the stability problem exist.

I have been doing some tests with various control techniques and
can summarize as follows.

Elevator.
Elevator back helps tracking before lift off during take off roll.
The stick should be eased forward after lift off and let the
elevator trim prevail.
When landing. Immediately after touch down, elevator forward spoils
lift on the canard and helps to keep the main wheels on the ground
and reduce bouncing.
After touchdown is assured, elevator back helps tracking .

Elevator trim.
Should be set, as part of the take off check list, for the desired
climb speed after lift off.
Should be set for the desired approach speed during landing
approach.

Reflexor.
Reflexor back helps tracking before lift off.
As the canard lifts off, moving the reflexor forward will create
more lift on the wing and help improve climb rate.
During approach, reflexor should be set to allow good vision of the
runway and enable a three point landing. This was the original
reason for the reflexor.
Reflexor back helps tracking after touchdown.

Aileron.
Reverse aileron steering (adverse yaw) becomes very effective on
the ground as speed is increased. There is very little adverse yaw
in-flight.
The stick should be centered at all times during ground operations
unless you are intentionally using this control.

Rudder pedals.
Driving the tail wheel is very effective when the tailwheel is on
the ground.
Some pilots report improved operation with the soft rubber tire and
some like the pneumatic tire. I have not tested either one. I think
the soft rubber is preferred. With the Air Products wheel, the tail
is raised and you can see the runway during take off roll.
The large tailwheel with springs is part of the JB 6 pack and has
many adherents. I have not tested it.
A bell crank with separate wires for the tailwheel and rudder is
part of the JB 6 pack. This enables the use of springs for the
tailwheel to soften it's effect. It also enables control of the
rudder should the tailspring break. This will not be very effective
with the standard rudder.

The standard rudder is not very effective during any ground
operation. If the tail wheel comes off the ground, control must be
switched to other than the rudder petals (toe brakes or aileron).
This is difficult to do and has caused many incidents. The standard
rudder is good for any in-flight operations.
The Frank Follmer rudder is very effective during all ground
operations so that one need not be concerned if the tail wheel lifts
off.
The FF rudder is not much more work if you have not built your fin
and rudder. Frank is no longer with us and I am looking into the
build data. It is very similar to the Dragonfly rudder. I think
Frank copied it and added a larger aerodynamic tab. When he
converted my fin and rudder to the FF, he kept the existing fin, cut
it to take the new rudder, made the rudder from scratch, kept the
existing two rudder hinges and added a third hinge above the other
two.

Toe brakes.
Are part of the JB 6 pack. I have not tested it. Adherents
believe it is a suitable alternative to a larger rudder.
There are some adherents of differential hand braking. This is
very easy to do with the addition of another master cylinder side-by-
side with the existing one.

It seems that we have a rather complex airplane. It's not your
father's Cessna.
We are making it better and I think we can do more. When I first
started with mine, I was riding along hoping that a disaster would
not happen. Now I feel like I am in control. I can operate out of a
60 X 2000 foot runway and think I can get it down to 40 X 1500.

Hope this helps.


James Postma
Q2 Revmaster N145EX
Q200 N8427
Steilacoom, Washington
(253) 584-1182 9:00 to 8:00 PDT
May your header tank be always full and your wings right side up.



Re: Help for new Q-200 pilot/owner

Bruce Crain
 

I thought it was "Jab(like take a poke at)eru". Are you troubling the air around S. Calif with that Q? If you get tired of the high cost of Calif remember it's cheaper in Oklahoma. We could use some more Q out here.
Bruce


-- britmcman@... wrote:


Hello Paul:

So YOU'RE "Jiberu" 3300 "! I remember now. That's gotta stick! I grew up
in Oklahoma. Bruce, ain't it pronounced Jiberu?

Phil Lankford
N870BM







Quickie Builders Association WEB site
http://www.quickiebuilders.org


Yahoo! Groups Links






________________________________________________________________
Juno Platinum $9.95. Juno SpeedBand $14.95.
Sign up for Juno Today at http://www.juno.com!
Look for special offers at Best Buy stores.


Re: bigger rudder or not?

Tri-Q1 <rryan@...>
 

Larry,

I believe they do, when there are no wheel alignment/tracking issues.

Ryan

--- In Q-LIST@..., larry severson <larry2@s...> wrote:

Terry & group,

I have a Q1 that is now a Tri-Q1.

I get rudder steering, at 18-20 mph IAS on the ground with the
standard rudder. I don't need brakes to TAXI after that.

Ryan N-2XV
The Q2/Q200, on the other hand, has no rudder steering below ~70MPH!


Larry Severson
Fountain Valley, CA 92708
(714) 968-9852
larry2@s...


Re: Help for new Q-200 pilot/owner

Brad Olson <n1tm@...>
 

Kevin,

Welcome to the Q community! Your original post certainly generated
replys - brakes, control, large rudder or not, upwind, downwind, on
and on!

I purchased a Q200 almost two years ago. The plane and builder were
known to many who read this group - 1TM is well built, has great
performance, was proven, and was flown from TX to CA for delivery.
Yet the builder and I agreed to certain inspection items before I
flew it. Consider the following before you fly.

Plane - Take it apart and inspect it. We put templates on all
control and flying surfaces to check their travel and shape,
measured ground angle of attack, checked all hardware for
completeness and tightness, checked the fuel system, replaced
filters, determined the fuel tank capacity, performed a weight and
balance, inspected brakes, and tied the plane down to make full
power ground runs. I had other builders inspect the plane -
consider having a EAA tech rep go yours. Recently a new Q owner did
not do many of these things and after a first flight crash (he is
OK) found the plane was mis-rigged and the engine did not operate at
power.

You - Taxi until you are comfortable. I spent a couple of hrs and
decided that I wanted (needed) a new tailwheel setup (part of the
Jim/Bob 6 pack)to really control the plane. Two weeks later, the
plane was "new," and I only needed a few full-length runs before
being ready. Fly to get ready for your Q - when you are tired of
Decathalon or Pitts landings, you are there. I've got less time
than you, and less tail dragger time. I flew a Citabria daily for a
week leading up to first flight and had one good hour of Q-200 air
time the day before I took my Q up.

Have a first flight plan - An EAA flight advisor can provide a lot
of assistance, focus you on the flying the plane, and relieve
distractions.

Good luck! Send me your email address and I will send info on the
tailwheel- brake setup that is working so well out in Livermore.

Note: A larger rudder was not needed when returning from OSH this
summer and landing in Wendover with winds 50 degress off the nose
at 30 to 38 knots. I was sure happy to have toe brakes, springs to
dampen the tailwheel, and a bellcrank to separate the tailwheel and
rudder. A larger rudder may have also worked, but involves a more
significant modification.

Brad Olson
N321TM,
Livermore, CA - 5 flying Q-200s on the field, 1 Q-200 being built


--- In Q-LIST@..., "Kevin Fortin" <kfortin@p...> wrote:
Hey folks,



My name is Kevin Fortin and I have recently purchased a formerly
flying
Q200, N275CH, and am based in Denver Colorado.
]


Re: Rudder size and slowdowns

JMasal@...
 

In a message dated 11/24/04 6:44:54 AM Central Standard Time,
shoskins@... writes:


I just had to throw one other thing in here, regarding the recent advocacy
of the bigger rudder by a good Q friend who happens to live in the Peach
Tree state. Not naming names, but this former fighter pilot and all around
nice guy has a bigger rudder installed. He also has one of the slowest
Q-200s out there. Not just a little slow, but seriously slow. Could there
be any correlation there? Hmmmmm?
Now that you just HAD to throw this one other thing in here, Mr. Hoskins,
might I just piggyback on it a bit.
As is this un-named person's right in the free country that he served in, he
may make both wacky and un-wacky design changes to his plane. For example,
when it became known that a ground angle of attack adjustment was needed for our
Q's most everybody solved that by changing the tailspring/tailwheel geometry.
Simple. This fellow however went to the front of the tailcone and changed the
cut of the cone at the jointline near the wing to bring the entire tailcone
down. Now I'm thinking you suddenly got some serious drag issues going on
compared to the tailwheel change. But its his plane. (What else might he have done?)
And I've heard him express dissatisfaction with its performance more than
once over the years... even, I believe, after he changed it back (I think). Now
I can stomach (barely) a guy going down a dirt road now and again if even its
to discover what won't work deliberately, but I think somebody oughta at least
raise a red flag of alert if he starts dragging other guys down there with
him... not that they can't go down there on their own volition... but just that
they are advised about possible traps and snares. Not namin' names, you
unnerstand, just tendencies toward wacky solutions. We have superior thousand-hour
planes from Malechek, Rusty Cowles, Hoskins, Fisher and even Moore, Patillo and
Bobby Mac. Why would somebody DELIBERATELY refuse to copy those guys?
Rhetorical question, I know the answer.


Re: Help for new Q-200 pilot/owner

Paul Spackman
 

Hey Phil,

Good job! I think that more Q pilots will step up to the plate and
help those getting ready to fly. Hope to see you at Laughlin again
this year.

Paul
Q-2 (What was it?) "Jiberu" 3300
--- In Q-LIST@..., britmcman@a... wrote:

In a message dated 11/24/04 9:00:07 A.M. Pacific Standard Time,
larry2@s... writes:

Not a
Dragonfly, as they aren't the same thing.
Even I know that, but it was the closest that I could get.



That's like the difference between young Anna Nicole and present
day Anna
Nicole. Larry, if you come down and visit me, I'll take you up
for a spin AND
buy you a hamburger. Ramona ain't that far away.

Phil Lankford
N870BM





Re: FW: Rudders/Kfortin

JMasal@...
 

In a message dated 11/24/04 2:49:33 PM Central Standard Time,
hawkidoug@... writes:


BTW: I still plan to taxi, taxi, and taxi some more.
Kevin Fortin
I am most delighted to hear that you are one who will listen and learn from
the wise voices of experience, Kevin.