Date   

Tri Q tyres

adrianbloomfield <adrian@...>
 

Hello

My girlfriend Lucy and I are about to buy a Quickie Tri Q over here in the UK. It has a Revmaster engine in the front.
If it's ok with the group, we'd like to try and source as much information on the characteristics of the plane so as not to be caught out.
Do you think it's possible to fly them from a grass strip as apposed to concrete runways?
Would taller walled tyres be to our advantage? Do any of you fly into or fly from grass strips over in the States? Our grass strip is 500m in length. Is this going to be adequate enough for the take off roll with two on board + some baggage?
Your views and comments would be very much appreciated.

Wishing you blue sky's and tailwinds

Adrian & Lucy


Onan Engine

Robert Hughes <rehughes11@...>
 

I have a Quickie Corp 18 HP Onan still in the original shipping crate
(from 1984 I think...right before they switched over to the 20 HP
heads). Most of the small parts (prop, prop hub, filters, push-pull
controls) are missing, but the exhaust is there. I would let it go
for a very good price if some Q1 builder or flyer could use it.
Contact me by email if interested.

Bob Hughes
Skyote, RV-3


Re: Q1

Mark A. Pearson <wlkabout@...>
 

Mike:
If you have a set of plans and templates and access to the welded parts to duplicate you can build a Q1 from "scratch." The "parts" of a Q1 are primarily rolls fo fibreglas cloth and variousl types of foan and the rigth epoxy. Good luck/success.

Mark

----- Original Message -----
From: necrotattoo
To: Q-LIST@...
Sent: Friday, March 07, 2008 5:43 PM
Subject: [Q-LIST] Q1


can the Q1 still be built from scrach maybe, or are thear parts avale,?
mike b
nc


Re: Trim

Peter Harris <peterjfharris@...>
 

Hi Allan,

For the trim I am using a standard throttle cable control which has a
threaded locking bezel. You set it then lock it and you unlock it to reset.
When unlocked the cable is free which is good for trim in climbing or
descent..

. I understand the vernier cable control for fine adjustment often used for
mixture has a release button but is normally locked and it would require
adjustment for climb and descent.

I am using one of these vernier controls for my throttle because it
automatically locks after setting ie no need to tighten a locking bezel and
there is fine control for idle or cruise.

Regards

Peter



_____

From: Q-LIST@... [mailto:Q-LIST@...] On Behalf Of
Allan Farr
Sent: Wednesday, 12 March 2008 6:07 AM
To: Q-LIST@...
Subject: [Q-LIST] Trim



Hi Peter. I'm not quite sure what you mean by "LH throttle cable". Do you
mean a vernier throttle control?
Regards
Allan

----- Original Message -----
From: Peter Harris
To: Q-LIST@yahoogroups. <mailto:Q-LIST%40yahoogroups.com> com
Sent: Tuesday, March 11, 2008 5:26 PM
Subject: RE: [Q-LIST] Differential brake pictures

Mike,

I have the LS1 canard and the sparrow strainers are OK. Using the LH
throttle cable control for my trim I can leave it free during take off and
climb ie there is no issue with stick forces. I set the trim (for nose down)
after leveling out and final trim with the reflexer which is electric. I
release it for descent and set it again (for nose up) turning base.

The issue that I had with the plans trim is because mine was stiff ie it did
not free wheel and by design it is always engaged. Having set up for cruise,
if the fan stops it was not easy to reset the trim and if it was not reset
you then have to hold against the springs and when speed drops off that gets
increasingly heavy.

Then reaching with the left hand to hold the stick against an increasing
load from the springs and unwind the trim with the RH my head was below the
sill and no view of the horizon. That was ugly with a silent engine.
Similarly the starter key ignition was central and also needed the RH. Now I
have a LH starter button just like a Bentley Continental

I particularly like the LH throttle cable control for trim because it can
be easily locked or unlocked at any setting, and as you say there is not
much force on the stick when it is unlocked.

The plans trim cannot be unlocked it is always engaged and therefore it
needs to be adjusted to the correct setting or otherwise freewheel when not
clamped.

Some of the guys find that it will freewheel which sort of solves the
problem, but by design I think it is not meant to free wheel because of the
ratio. Mine did not.

You could test for freewheeling by moving the stick fore and aft on the
ground while the plans trim is not clamped. The wheel would move like a
little buzz saw. .

I agree the left side is getting crowded. I have aileron trim, pitch trim,
a single finger brake, a toggle for the reflexor, a restart button, throttle
and choke, but they all feel different.

If I was starting over I would make two side sticks and centralize all the
other controls and that would leave the RH available for writing also. Pat
has a schematic from the Dragonfly.

Peter

.

_____

From: Q-LIST@yahoogroups. <mailto:Q-LIST%40yahoogroups.com> com
[mailto:Q-LIST@yahoogroups. <mailto:Q-LIST%40yahoogroups.com> com] On Behalf
Of
Mike Perry
Sent: Tuesday, 11 March 2008 11:33 AM
To: Q-LIST@yahoogroups. <mailto:Q-LIST%40yahoogroups.com> com
Subject: RE: [Q-LIST] Differential brake pictures

Peter, several thoughts:

1) If I remember right, you have a GU canard, guys with LS-1 and the
sparrow strainers set right don't have much force on the trim (anyone with
a flying LS-1 agree or disagree?)

2) In a Cessna 172 or Piper Cherokee I can set the trim for best glide
without looking -- just trim full nose up, you will be within 1-2 knots of
best glide. It seems to me that you should set trim limits the same way in
your experimental. (Some instructors don't like full nose up trim, "you
can get an accelerated stall . . ." Rubbish. It's in the certification
standards, at least for these light planes, that you can't get a stall at
any trim setting without further control input. It sure makes it easy to
run the "engine out" protocol if you don't have to worry about
setting/holding best glide speed.)

3) I've thought about putting trim to the left, but the left side is
getting real crowded with engine controls, reflexor and finger brakes all
on the left side. Some days I think it would be better to fly out of the
right seat with the stick in my left hand and my right hand free for all
these other things -- then I think, "nah, just finish the thing and go fly."

Thanks for the insights, I'm still thinking about it.

Mike Perry
Q-2xx in progress, Canard repair and engine next

At 01:56 PM 3/10/2008 +1000, you wrote:

Mike if you are thinking about ergonomics, consider making a pitch trim to
be operated with the left hand. I had some anxious moments when the fan
stopped due to the Norton rotary engine. My plans built trim was stiff ie
it
did not freewheel and so it had to be manually adjusted up or down. For me
that meant changing hands on the stick leaning forward to use my RH on the
trim wheel so I could not see the horizon momentarily. When the fan stops
you need to be able to hold the stick with the RH and trim the nose up and
you need to be able to hold the nose up easily while you adjust the trim.
You need the left hand ready to operate the throttle in a re start and you
need a start button near the LH. I fitted a starter button near the
throttle
for LH operation. You should be able to see the horizon throughout the
procedure.

I made a LH trim control using a throttle cable which I use disengaged
until
required I mounted the supplied trim springs vertically and the free end of
the Throttle cable pushes or pulls at the centre of the springs. The outer
end of the cable is secured to the mount that was used before for the
original cord pulley attachment.

Peter

(PS Sam is right, spam cans are not for friends)

_____

From: <mailto:Q-LIST%40yahoogroups.com>Q-LIST@yahoogroups.
<mailto:Q-LIST%40yahoogroups.com> com
[mailto:Q-LIST@yahoogroups. <mailto:Q-LIST%40yahoogroups.com> com] On
Behalf Of
Mike Perry
Sent: Monday, 10 March 2008 1:26 PM
To: <mailto:Q-LIST%40yahoogroups.com>Q-LIST@yahoogroups.
<mailto:Q-LIST%40yahoogroups.com> com
Subject: Re: [Q-LIST] Differential brake pictures

Well I'm not making any snide comments, Sam. I appreciate Paul's help with
the pictures of cockpit layout and fingerbrakes -- and your's too. I'm
still trying to figure out ergonomics, maintainability and buildability
(whatever those last few words might mean!).

Mike Perry
Q-2xx in progress


Trim

Allan Farr
 

Hi Peter. I'm not quite sure what you mean by "LH throttle cable". Do you mean a vernier throttle control?
Regards
Allan

----- Original Message -----
From: Peter Harris
To: Q-LIST@...
Sent: Tuesday, March 11, 2008 5:26 PM
Subject: RE: [Q-LIST] Differential brake pictures


Mike,

I have the LS1 canard and the sparrow strainers are OK. Using the LH
throttle cable control for my trim I can leave it free during take off and
climb ie there is no issue with stick forces. I set the trim (for nose down)
after leveling out and final trim with the reflexer which is electric. I
release it for descent and set it again (for nose up) turning base.

The issue that I had with the plans trim is because mine was stiff ie it did
not free wheel and by design it is always engaged. Having set up for cruise,
if the fan stops it was not easy to reset the trim and if it was not reset
you then have to hold against the springs and when speed drops off that gets
increasingly heavy.

Then reaching with the left hand to hold the stick against an increasing
load from the springs and unwind the trim with the RH my head was below the
sill and no view of the horizon. That was ugly with a silent engine.
Similarly the starter key ignition was central and also needed the RH. Now I
have a LH starter button just like a Bentley Continental

I particularly like the LH throttle cable control for trim because it can
be easily locked or unlocked at any setting, and as you say there is not
much force on the stick when it is unlocked.

The plans trim cannot be unlocked it is always engaged and therefore it
needs to be adjusted to the correct setting or otherwise freewheel when not
clamped.

Some of the guys find that it will freewheel which sort of solves the
problem, but by design I think it is not meant to free wheel because of the
ratio. Mine did not.

You could test for freewheeling by moving the stick fore and aft on the
ground while the plans trim is not clamped. The wheel would move like a
little buzz saw. .

I agree the left side is getting crowded. I have aileron trim, pitch trim,
a single finger brake, a toggle for the reflexor, a restart button, throttle
and choke, but they all feel different.

If I was starting over I would make two side sticks and centralize all the
other controls and that would leave the RH available for writing also. Pat
has a schematic from the Dragonfly.

Peter

.

_____

From: Q-LIST@... [mailto:Q-LIST@...] On Behalf Of
Mike Perry
Sent: Tuesday, 11 March 2008 11:33 AM
To: Q-LIST@...
Subject: RE: [Q-LIST] Differential brake pictures

Peter, several thoughts:

1) If I remember right, you have a GU canard, guys with LS-1 and the
sparrow strainers set right don't have much force on the trim (anyone with
a flying LS-1 agree or disagree?)

2) In a Cessna 172 or Piper Cherokee I can set the trim for best glide
without looking -- just trim full nose up, you will be within 1-2 knots of
best glide. It seems to me that you should set trim limits the same way in
your experimental. (Some instructors don't like full nose up trim, "you
can get an accelerated stall . . ." Rubbish. It's in the certification
standards, at least for these light planes, that you can't get a stall at
any trim setting without further control input. It sure makes it easy to
run the "engine out" protocol if you don't have to worry about
setting/holding best glide speed.)

3) I've thought about putting trim to the left, but the left side is
getting real crowded with engine controls, reflexor and finger brakes all
on the left side. Some days I think it would be better to fly out of the
right seat with the stick in my left hand and my right hand free for all
these other things -- then I think, "nah, just finish the thing and go fly."

Thanks for the insights, I'm still thinking about it.

Mike Perry
Q-2xx in progress, Canard repair and engine next

At 01:56 PM 3/10/2008 +1000, you wrote:

>Mike if you are thinking about ergonomics, consider making a pitch trim to
>be operated with the left hand. I had some anxious moments when the fan
>stopped due to the Norton rotary engine. My plans built trim was stiff ie
it
>did not freewheel and so it had to be manually adjusted up or down. For me
>that meant changing hands on the stick leaning forward to use my RH on the
>trim wheel so I could not see the horizon momentarily. When the fan stops
>you need to be able to hold the stick with the RH and trim the nose up and
>you need to be able to hold the nose up easily while you adjust the trim.
>You need the left hand ready to operate the throttle in a re start and you
>need a start button near the LH. I fitted a starter button near the
throttle
>for LH operation. You should be able to see the horizon throughout the
>procedure.
>
>I made a LH trim control using a throttle cable which I use disengaged
until
>required I mounted the supplied trim springs vertically and the free end of
>the Throttle cable pushes or pulls at the centre of the springs. The outer
>end of the cable is secured to the mount that was used before for the
>original cord pulley attachment.
>
>Peter
>
>(PS Sam is right, spam cans are not for friends)
>
>_____
>
>From: <mailto:Q-LIST%40yahoogroups.com>Q-LIST@yahoogroups.
<mailto:Q-LIST%40yahoogroups.com> com
>[mailto:Q-LIST@yahoogroups. <mailto:Q-LIST%40yahoogroups.com> com] On
Behalf Of
>Mike Perry
>Sent: Monday, 10 March 2008 1:26 PM
>To: <mailto:Q-LIST%40yahoogroups.com>Q-LIST@yahoogroups.
<mailto:Q-LIST%40yahoogroups.com> com
>Subject: Re: [Q-LIST] Differential brake pictures
>
>Well I'm not making any snide comments, Sam. I appreciate Paul's help with
>the pictures of cockpit layout and fingerbrakes -- and your's too. I'm
>still trying to figure out ergonomics, maintainability and buildability
>(whatever those last few words might mean!).
>
>Mike Perry
>Q-2xx in progress


Re: the Official Runway Distance thread

quickieq2uk
 

Thanks for the info guys. I thought that's what the answer would be.

Regards,

Simon

Jerry Marstall <jnmarstall@...> wrote:
Not mine. If a Q can't get out a Tri-Q definitely won't
J

quickieq2uk wrote:

Can anybody tell me realistically what the take off and landing
distance for a Tri-Q is? I have a friend who owns a 600m grass strip
and another guy who is based there has just bought a Tri-Q and is
expecting to base it there. I only have experience of the Q2 and
certainly would not attempt to take a Q2 in there. My friend is
quite rightly concerned about having a machine based at his strip
that may be unsuitable to be operated from it and he asked me to
check whether or not a Tri-Q would get in and out of a strip that
length, as I am fairly doubtful it would.

Simon Wilson
Q2 G-OSAW
United Kingdom

--- In Q-LIST@... <mailto:Q-LIST%40yahoogroups.com>,
"quickieaircraft"
<quickieaircraft@...> wrote:

I've been looking through the archives trying to figure out what a
reasonable expectation for a minimum TO/LD distance is for these
planes. I have encountered everything from 700ft (Mike!) to 3500
ft. If you want, post the distance that YOU takeoff/land in.

Please also include:
1)if you've got a tri (you might be able to hit the brakes harder)
or
taildragger
2) Your prop--unless you like to land deadstick
3) any mods, esp the reflexor (and its setting) or VGs.
4) GVW during the TO/LD
5) field condition: wet, asphalt, grass?
6) whether you're pulling the stick aft, neutral, or fwd.
7) the airspeed @which you flare, hit the brakes, call your wife,
and
do other important things.


Hopefully, we'll be able to identify what it is that those short
landing guys are doing right. But I've got a personal motivation
too. There's an airport by my house (CGS) that's 2607 x60ft and
could represent a high pucker factor.







---------------------------------
Sent from Yahoo! Mail.
The World 's Favourite Email.


Re: Differential brake pictures

Doug Humble <hawkidoug@...>
 

You guys should change the subject line for this topic as it is now something other than about brakes.

Thanks!

Doug "Hawkeye" Humble
A Sign Above www.asignabove.net
Omaha NE
N25974

----- Original Message -----
From: Peter Harris
To: Q-LIST@...
Sent: Monday, March 10, 2008 10:26 PM
Subject: RE: [Q-LIST] Differential brake pictures


Mike,

I have the LS1 canard and the sparrow strainers are OK. Using the LH
throttle cable control for my trim I can leave it free during take off and
climb ie there is no issue with stick forces. I set the trim (for nose down)
after leveling out and final trim with the reflexer which is electric. I
release it for descent and set it again (for nose up) turning base.

The issue that I had with the plans trim is because mine was stiff ie it did
not free wheel and by design it is always engaged. Having set up for cruise,
if the fan stops it was not easy to reset the trim and if it was not reset
you then have to hold against the springs and when speed drops off that gets
increasingly heavy.

Then reaching with the left hand to hold the stick against an increasing
load from the springs and unwind the trim with the RH my head was below the
sill and no view of the horizon. That was ugly with a silent engine.
Similarly the starter key ignition was central and also needed the RH. Now I
have a LH starter button just like a Bentley Continental

I particularly like the LH throttle cable control for trim because it can
be easily locked or unlocked at any setting, and as you say there is not
much force on the stick when it is unlocked.

The plans trim cannot be unlocked it is always engaged and therefore it
needs to be adjusted to the correct setting or otherwise freewheel when not
clamped.

Some of the guys find that it will freewheel which sort of solves the
problem, but by design I think it is not meant to free wheel because of the
ratio. Mine did not.

You could test for freewheeling by moving the stick fore and aft on the
ground while the plans trim is not clamped. The wheel would move like a
little buzz saw. .

I agree the left side is getting crowded. I have aileron trim, pitch trim,
a single finger brake, a toggle for the reflexor, a restart button, throttle
and choke, but they all feel different.

If I was starting over I would make two side sticks and centralize all the
other controls and that would leave the RH available for writing also. Pat
has a schematic from the Dragonfly.

Peter

.

_____

From: Q-LIST@... [mailto:Q-LIST@...] On Behalf Of
Mike Perry
Sent: Tuesday, 11 March 2008 11:33 AM
To: Q-LIST@...
Subject: RE: [Q-LIST] Differential brake pictures

Peter, several thoughts:

1) If I remember right, you have a GU canard, guys with LS-1 and the
sparrow strainers set right don't have much force on the trim (anyone with
a flying LS-1 agree or disagree?)

2) In a Cessna 172 or Piper Cherokee I can set the trim for best glide
without looking -- just trim full nose up, you will be within 1-2 knots of
best glide. It seems to me that you should set trim limits the same way in
your experimental. (Some instructors don't like full nose up trim, "you
can get an accelerated stall . . ." Rubbish. It's in the certification
standards, at least for these light planes, that you can't get a stall at
any trim setting without further control input. It sure makes it easy to
run the "engine out" protocol if you don't have to worry about
setting/holding best glide speed.)

3) I've thought about putting trim to the left, but the left side is
getting real crowded with engine controls, reflexor and finger brakes all
on the left side. Some days I think it would be better to fly out of the
right seat with the stick in my left hand and my right hand free for all
these other things -- then I think, "nah, just finish the thing and go fly."

Thanks for the insights, I'm still thinking about it.

Mike Perry
Q-2xx in progress, Canard repair and engine next

At 01:56 PM 3/10/2008 +1000, you wrote:

>Mike if you are thinking about ergonomics, consider making a pitch trim to
>be operated with the left hand. I had some anxious moments when the fan
>stopped due to the Norton rotary engine. My plans built trim was stiff ie
it
>did not freewheel and so it had to be manually adjusted up or down. For me
>that meant changing hands on the stick leaning forward to use my RH on the
>trim wheel so I could not see the horizon momentarily. When the fan stops
>you need to be able to hold the stick with the RH and trim the nose up and
>you need to be able to hold the nose up easily while you adjust the trim.
>You need the left hand ready to operate the throttle in a re start and you
>need a start button near the LH. I fitted a starter button near the
throttle
>for LH operation. You should be able to see the horizon throughout the
>procedure.
>
>I made a LH trim control using a throttle cable which I use disengaged
until
>required I mounted the supplied trim springs vertically and the free end of
>the Throttle cable pushes or pulls at the centre of the springs. The outer
>end of the cable is secured to the mount that was used before for the
>original cord pulley attachment.
>
>Peter
>
>(PS Sam is right, spam cans are not for friends)
>
>_____
>
>From: <mailto:Q-LIST%40yahoogroups.com>Q-LIST@yahoogroups.
<mailto:Q-LIST%40yahoogroups.com> com
>[mailto:Q-LIST@yahoogroups. <mailto:Q-LIST%40yahoogroups.com> com] On
Behalf Of
>Mike Perry
>Sent: Monday, 10 March 2008 1:26 PM
>To: <mailto:Q-LIST%40yahoogroups.com>Q-LIST@yahoogroups.
<mailto:Q-LIST%40yahoogroups.com> com
>Subject: Re: [Q-LIST] Differential brake pictures
>
>Well I'm not making any snide comments, Sam. I appreciate Paul's help with
>the pictures of cockpit layout and fingerbrakes -- and your's too. I'm
>still trying to figure out ergonomics, maintainability and buildability
>(whatever those last few words might mean!).
>
>Mike Perry
>Q-2xx in progress


Re: Differential brake pictures

Peter Harris <peterjfharris@...>
 

Mike,

I have the LS1 canard and the sparrow strainers are OK. Using the LH
throttle cable control for my trim I can leave it free during take off and
climb ie there is no issue with stick forces. I set the trim (for nose down)
after leveling out and final trim with the reflexer which is electric. I
release it for descent and set it again (for nose up) turning base.

The issue that I had with the plans trim is because mine was stiff ie it did
not free wheel and by design it is always engaged. Having set up for cruise,
if the fan stops it was not easy to reset the trim and if it was not reset
you then have to hold against the springs and when speed drops off that gets
increasingly heavy.

Then reaching with the left hand to hold the stick against an increasing
load from the springs and unwind the trim with the RH my head was below the
sill and no view of the horizon. That was ugly with a silent engine.
Similarly the starter key ignition was central and also needed the RH. Now I
have a LH starter button just like a Bentley Continental

I particularly like the LH throttle cable control for trim because it can
be easily locked or unlocked at any setting, and as you say there is not
much force on the stick when it is unlocked.

The plans trim cannot be unlocked it is always engaged and therefore it
needs to be adjusted to the correct setting or otherwise freewheel when not
clamped.

Some of the guys find that it will freewheel which sort of solves the
problem, but by design I think it is not meant to free wheel because of the
ratio. Mine did not.

You could test for freewheeling by moving the stick fore and aft on the
ground while the plans trim is not clamped. The wheel would move like a
little buzz saw. .

I agree the left side is getting crowded. I have aileron trim, pitch trim,
a single finger brake, a toggle for the reflexor, a restart button, throttle
and choke, but they all feel different.

If I was starting over I would make two side sticks and centralize all the
other controls and that would leave the RH available for writing also. Pat
has a schematic from the Dragonfly.

Peter



.



_____

From: Q-LIST@... [mailto:Q-LIST@...] On Behalf Of
Mike Perry
Sent: Tuesday, 11 March 2008 11:33 AM
To: Q-LIST@...
Subject: RE: [Q-LIST] Differential brake pictures



Peter, several thoughts:

1) If I remember right, you have a GU canard, guys with LS-1 and the
sparrow strainers set right don't have much force on the trim (anyone with
a flying LS-1 agree or disagree?)

2) In a Cessna 172 or Piper Cherokee I can set the trim for best glide
without looking -- just trim full nose up, you will be within 1-2 knots of
best glide. It seems to me that you should set trim limits the same way in
your experimental. (Some instructors don't like full nose up trim, "you
can get an accelerated stall . . ." Rubbish. It's in the certification
standards, at least for these light planes, that you can't get a stall at
any trim setting without further control input. It sure makes it easy to
run the "engine out" protocol if you don't have to worry about
setting/holding best glide speed.)

3) I've thought about putting trim to the left, but the left side is
getting real crowded with engine controls, reflexor and finger brakes all
on the left side. Some days I think it would be better to fly out of the
right seat with the stick in my left hand and my right hand free for all
these other things -- then I think, "nah, just finish the thing and go fly."

Thanks for the insights, I'm still thinking about it.

Mike Perry
Q-2xx in progress, Canard repair and engine next

At 01:56 PM 3/10/2008 +1000, you wrote:

Mike if you are thinking about ergonomics, consider making a pitch trim to
be operated with the left hand. I had some anxious moments when the fan
stopped due to the Norton rotary engine. My plans built trim was stiff ie
it
did not freewheel and so it had to be manually adjusted up or down. For me
that meant changing hands on the stick leaning forward to use my RH on the
trim wheel so I could not see the horizon momentarily. When the fan stops
you need to be able to hold the stick with the RH and trim the nose up and
you need to be able to hold the nose up easily while you adjust the trim.
You need the left hand ready to operate the throttle in a re start and you
need a start button near the LH. I fitted a starter button near the
throttle
for LH operation. You should be able to see the horizon throughout the
procedure.

I made a LH trim control using a throttle cable which I use disengaged
until
required I mounted the supplied trim springs vertically and the free end of
the Throttle cable pushes or pulls at the centre of the springs. The outer
end of the cable is secured to the mount that was used before for the
original cord pulley attachment.

Peter

(PS Sam is right, spam cans are not for friends)

_____

From: <mailto:Q-LIST%40yahoogroups.com>Q-LIST@yahoogroups.
<mailto:Q-LIST%40yahoogroups.com> com
[mailto:Q-LIST@yahoogroups. <mailto:Q-LIST%40yahoogroups.com> com] On
Behalf Of
Mike Perry
Sent: Monday, 10 March 2008 1:26 PM
To: <mailto:Q-LIST%40yahoogroups.com>Q-LIST@yahoogroups.
<mailto:Q-LIST%40yahoogroups.com> com
Subject: Re: [Q-LIST] Differential brake pictures

Well I'm not making any snide comments, Sam. I appreciate Paul's help with
the pictures of cockpit layout and fingerbrakes -- and your's too. I'm
still trying to figure out ergonomics, maintainability and buildability
(whatever those last few words might mean!).

Mike Perry
Q-2xx in progress


Re: Differential brake pictures

Mike Perry <dmperry1012@...>
 

Peter, several thoughts:

1) If I remember right, you have a GU canard, guys with LS-1 and the
sparrow strainers set right don't have much force on the trim (anyone with
a flying LS-1 agree or disagree?)

2) In a Cessna 172 or Piper Cherokee I can set the trim for best glide
without looking -- just trim full nose up, you will be within 1-2 knots of
best glide. It seems to me that you should set trim limits the same way in
your experimental. (Some instructors don't like full nose up trim, "you
can get an accelerated stall . . ." Rubbish. It's in the certification
standards, at least for these light planes, that you can't get a stall at
any trim setting without further control input. It sure makes it easy to
run the "engine out" protocol if you don't have to worry about
setting/holding best glide speed.)

3) I've thought about putting trim to the left, but the left side is
getting real crowded with engine controls, reflexor and finger brakes all
on the left side. Some days I think it would be better to fly out of the
right seat with the stick in my left hand and my right hand free for all
these other things -- then I think, "nah, just finish the thing and go fly."

Thanks for the insights, I'm still thinking about it.

Mike Perry
Q-2xx in progress, Canard repair and engine next

At 01:56 PM 3/10/2008 +1000, you wrote:

Mike if you are thinking about ergonomics, consider making a pitch trim to
be operated with the left hand. I had some anxious moments when the fan
stopped due to the Norton rotary engine. My plans built trim was stiff ie it
did not freewheel and so it had to be manually adjusted up or down. For me
that meant changing hands on the stick leaning forward to use my RH on the
trim wheel so I could not see the horizon momentarily. When the fan stops
you need to be able to hold the stick with the RH and trim the nose up and
you need to be able to hold the nose up easily while you adjust the trim.
You need the left hand ready to operate the throttle in a re start and you
need a start button near the LH. I fitted a starter button near the throttle
for LH operation. You should be able to see the horizon throughout the
procedure.

I made a LH trim control using a throttle cable which I use disengaged until
required I mounted the supplied trim springs vertically and the free end of
the Throttle cable pushes or pulls at the centre of the springs. The outer
end of the cable is secured to the mount that was used before for the
original cord pulley attachment.

Peter

(PS Sam is right, spam cans are not for friends)

_____

From: <mailto:Q-LIST%40yahoogroups.com>Q-LIST@...
[mailto:Q-LIST@...] On Behalf Of
Mike Perry
Sent: Monday, 10 March 2008 1:26 PM
To: <mailto:Q-LIST%40yahoogroups.com>Q-LIST@...
Subject: Re: [Q-LIST] Differential brake pictures

Well I'm not making any snide comments, Sam. I appreciate Paul's help with
the pictures of cockpit layout and fingerbrakes -- and your's too. I'm
still trying to figure out ergonomics, maintainability and buildability
(whatever those last few words might mean!).

Mike Perry
Q-2xx in progress


Re: the Official Runway Distance thread

Jerry Marstall <jnmarstall@...>
 

Not mine. If a Q can't get out a Tri-Q definitely won't
J

quickieq2uk wrote:


Can anybody tell me realistically what the take off and landing
distance for a Tri-Q is? I have a friend who owns a 600m grass strip
and another guy who is based there has just bought a Tri-Q and is
expecting to base it there. I only have experience of the Q2 and
certainly would not attempt to take a Q2 in there. My friend is
quite rightly concerned about having a machine based at his strip
that may be unsuitable to be operated from it and he asked me to
check whether or not a Tri-Q would get in and out of a strip that
length, as I am fairly doubtful it would.

Simon Wilson
Q2 G-OSAW
United Kingdom

--- In Q-LIST@... <mailto:Q-LIST%40yahoogroups.com>,
"quickieaircraft"
<quickieaircraft@...> wrote:

I've been looking through the archives trying to figure out what a
reasonable expectation for a minimum TO/LD distance is for these
planes. I have encountered everything from 700ft (Mike!) to 3500
ft. If you want, post the distance that YOU takeoff/land in.

Please also include:
1)if you've got a tri (you might be able to hit the brakes harder)
or
taildragger
2) Your prop--unless you like to land deadstick
3) any mods, esp the reflexor (and its setting) or VGs.
4) GVW during the TO/LD
5) field condition: wet, asphalt, grass?
6) whether you're pulling the stick aft, neutral, or fwd.
7) the airspeed @which you flare, hit the brakes, call your wife,
and
do other important things.


Hopefully, we'll be able to identify what it is that those short
landing guys are doing right. But I've got a personal motivation
too. There's an airport by my house (CGS) that's 2607 x60ft and
could represent a high pucker factor.


Flight report

Kevin Boddicker <trumanst@...>
 

Listers,
Today was the second anniversary of my first flight. What would she
think if I had forgotten our anniversary? Well the weather was the
best it has been since last November. No really!
I was even warm in the cockpit. Started off with a planned T&G, but
had to abort on final as there was a twin piper back taxing right at
me. He was talking to the ground radio, and did not hear me announce.
No big deal. Went around and did the T&G. Then flew around the area
for a while, just because I could. Back to the pattern for landing. A
bit high on final but things came together and I made the best
landing I have for a very long time. Good enough. I put her away,
swept some of the now melted ice out of the hanger and closed the door.
I know this not as exciting as some flight reports, but it was
exciting to me to be able to fly.
I remember Jerry Marstall telling me to try to get something
accomplished every day. Eventually you will be flying.
Keep at it. I can't say it too many times. It's worth it!!!!

Kevin Boddicker
Tri Q 200 N7868B 83.8 hours
Luana, IA.


Re: the Official Runway Distance thread

quickieq2uk
 

Can anybody tell me realistically what the take off and landing
distance for a Tri-Q is? I have a friend who owns a 600m grass strip
and another guy who is based there has just bought a Tri-Q and is
expecting to base it there. I only have experience of the Q2 and
certainly would not attempt to take a Q2 in there. My friend is
quite rightly concerned about having a machine based at his strip
that may be unsuitable to be operated from it and he asked me to
check whether or not a Tri-Q would get in and out of a strip that
length, as I am fairly doubtful it would.

Simon Wilson
Q2 G-OSAW
United Kingdom



--- In Q-LIST@..., "quickieaircraft"
<quickieaircraft@...> wrote:

I've been looking through the archives trying to figure out what a
reasonable expectation for a minimum TO/LD distance is for these
planes. I have encountered everything from 700ft (Mike!) to 3500
ft. If you want, post the distance that YOU takeoff/land in.

Please also include:
1)if you've got a tri (you might be able to hit the brakes harder)
or
taildragger
2) Your prop--unless you like to land deadstick
3) any mods, esp the reflexor (and its setting) or VGs.
4) GVW during the TO/LD
5) field condition: wet, asphalt, grass?
6) whether you're pulling the stick aft, neutral, or fwd.
7) the airspeed @which you flare, hit the brakes, call your wife,
and
do other important things.


Hopefully, we'll be able to identify what it is that those short
landing guys are doing right. But I've got a personal motivation
too. There's an airport by my house (CGS) that's 2607 x60ft and
could represent a high pucker factor.


Re: the Official Runway Distance thread

MartinErni@...
 

Simon,
He might make it in and out a few times before the accident but not
many. That is assuming he has lots and lots of experience in the type.
Earnest Martin
Triq200 > 1000 hours

In a message dated 3/10/2008 6:21:03 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
quickieq2uk@... writes:




Can anybody tell me realistically what the take off and landing
distance for a Tri-Q is? I have a friend who owns a 600m grass strip
and another guy who is based there has just bought a Tri-Q and is
expecting to base it there. I only have experience of the Q2 and
certainly would not attempt to take a Q2 in there. My friend is
quite rightly concerned about having a machine based at his strip
that may be unsuitable to be operated from it and he asked me to
check whether or not a Tri-Q would get in and out of a strip that
length, as I am fairly doubtful it would.

Simon Wilson
Q2 G-OSAW
United Kingdom

--- In _Q-LIST@... (mailto:Q-LIST@...) ,
"quickieaircraft"
<quickieaircraft@qui> wrote:

I've been looking through the archives trying to figure out what a
reasonable expectation for a minimum TO/LD distance is for these
planes. I have encountered everything from 700ft (Mike!) to 3500
ft. If you want, post the distance that YOU takeoff/land in.

Please also include:
1)if you've got a tri (you might be able to hit the brakes harder)
or
taildragger
2) Your prop--unless you like to land deadstick
3) any mods, esp the reflexor (and its setting) or VGs.
4) GVW during the TO/LD
5) field condition: wet, asphalt, grass?
6) whether you're pulling the stick aft, neutral, or fwd.
7) the airspeed @which you flare, hit the brakes, call your wife,
and
do other important things.


Hopefully, we'll be able to identify what it is that those short
landing guys are doing right. But I've got a personal motivation
too. There's an airport by my house (CGS) that's 2607 x60ft and
could represent a high pucker factor.






**************It's Tax Time! Get tips, forms, and advice on AOL Money &
Finance. (http://money.aol.com/tax?NCID=aolprf00030000000001)


Re: Differential brake pictures

Peter Harris <peterjfharris@...>
 

Mike if you are thinking about ergonomics, consider making a pitch trim to
be operated with the left hand. I had some anxious moments when the fan
stopped due to the Norton rotary engine. My plans built trim was stiff ie it
did not freewheel and so it had to be manually adjusted up or down. For me
that meant changing hands on the stick leaning forward to use my RH on the
trim wheel so I could not see the horizon momentarily. When the fan stops
you need to be able to hold the stick with the RH and trim the nose up and
you need to be able to hold the nose up easily while you adjust the trim.
You need the left hand ready to operate the throttle in a re start and you
need a start button near the LH. I fitted a starter button near the throttle
for LH operation. You should be able to see the horizon throughout the
procedure.

I made a LH trim control using a throttle cable which I use disengaged until
required I mounted the supplied trim springs vertically and the free end of
the Throttle cable pushes or pulls at the centre of the springs. The outer
end of the cable is secured to the mount that was used before for the
original cord pulley attachment.

Peter

(PS Sam is right, spam cans are not for friends)



_____

From: Q-LIST@... [mailto:Q-LIST@...] On Behalf Of
Mike Perry
Sent: Monday, 10 March 2008 1:26 PM
To: Q-LIST@...
Subject: Re: [Q-LIST] Differential brake pictures



Well I'm not making any snide comments, Sam. I appreciate Paul's help with
the pictures of cockpit layout and fingerbrakes -- and your's too. I'm
still trying to figure out ergonomics, maintainability and buildability
(whatever those last few words might mean!).

Mike Perry
Q-2xx in progress

At 04:26 PM 3/9/2008 -0500, you wrote:

Friends don't let friends build metal airplanes.

*Sam Hoskins
Quickie Blog
<<http://www.samhoski <http://www.samhoskins.blogspot.com>
ns.blogspot.com>http://www.samhoski <http://www.samhoskins.blogspot.com>
ns.blogspot.com>
Quickie Website
<<http://home. <http://home.mchsi.com/%7Eshoskins/index.htm>
mchsi.com/%7Eshoskins/index.htm>http://home.
<http://home.mchsi.com/%7Eshoskins/index.htm>
mchsi.com/%7Eshoskins/index.htm>

**On Sun, Mar 9, 2008 at 3:25 PM, n17pf
<<mailto:FisherPaul%40johndeere.com>FisherPaul@johndeer
<mailto:FisherPaul%40johndeere.com> e.com> wrote:
*

* * * * * *

*I finally got around to taking some pictures of my differential brakes
and posted them here:
<http://picasaweb.
<http://picasaweb.google.com/rv7a.n18pf/Q200DifferentialBrakesN17PF>
google.com/rv7a.n18pf/Q200DifferentialBrakesN17PF>http://picasaweb.
<http://picasaweb.google.com/rv7a.n18pf/Q200DifferentialBrakesN17PF>
google.com/rv7a.n18pf/Q200DifferentialBrakesN17PF
or here if the first one wraps:
<http://tinyurl. <http://tinyurl.com/2ssekr> com/2ssekr>http://tinyurl.
<http://tinyurl.com/2ssekr> com/2ssekr

Perhaps I waited long enough that nobody cares anymore. But this
topic does come up from time to time, so now I've got pictures!

Hopefully, winter is just about over and we'll get some decent flying
weather.

Paul A. Fisher
Q-200, N17PF ~1335 hours in ~17.5 years


Re: Differential brake pictures

Mike Perry <dmperry1012@...>
 

Well I'm not making any snide comments, Sam. I appreciate Paul's help with
the pictures of cockpit layout and fingerbrakes -- and your's too. I'm
still trying to figure out ergonomics, maintainability and buildability
(whatever those last few words might mean!).

Mike Perry
Q-2xx in progress

At 04:26 PM 3/9/2008 -0500, you wrote:

Friends don't let friends build metal airplanes.

*Sam Hoskins
Quickie Blog
<<http://www.samhoskins.blogspot.com>http://www.samhoskins.blogspot.com>
Quickie Website
<<http://home.mchsi.com/%7Eshoskins/index.htm>http://home.mchsi.com/%7Eshoskins/index.htm>

**On Sun, Mar 9, 2008 at 3:25 PM, n17pf
<<mailto:FisherPaul%40johndeere.com>FisherPaul@...> wrote:
*

* * * * * *

*I finally got around to taking some pictures of my differential brakes
and posted them here:
<http://picasaweb.google.com/rv7a.n18pf/Q200DifferentialBrakesN17PF>http://picasaweb.google.com/rv7a.n18pf/Q200DifferentialBrakesN17PF
or here if the first one wraps:
<http://tinyurl.com/2ssekr>http://tinyurl.com/2ssekr

Perhaps I waited long enough that nobody cares anymore. But this
topic does come up from time to time, so now I've got pictures!

Hopefully, winter is just about over and we'll get some decent flying
weather.

Paul A. Fisher
Q-200, N17PF ~1335 hours in ~17.5 years


Re: Differential brake pictures

Sam Hoskins
 

Friends don't let friends build metal airplanes.


*Sam Hoskins
Quickie Blog <http://www.samhoskins.blogspot.com>
Quickie Website <http://home.mchsi.com/%7Eshoskins/index.htm>

**On Sun, Mar 9, 2008 at 3:25 PM, n17pf <FisherPaul@...> wrote:
*

* * * * * *

*I finally got around to taking some pictures of my differential brakes
and posted them here:
http://picasaweb.google.com/rv7a.n18pf/Q200DifferentialBrakesN17PF
or here if the first one wraps:
http://tinyurl.com/2ssekr

Perhaps I waited long enough that nobody cares anymore. But this
topic does come up from time to time, so now I've got pictures!

Hopefully, winter is just about over and we'll get some decent flying
weather.

Paul A. Fisher
Q-200, N17PF ~1335 hours in ~17.5 years

*
* *
* *
*
*


New interiors

Anthony <cdnpilot2002@...>
 

Hi all, I saw pictures of Bob Clark's Tri-Q and love what I saw. If
anyone can give me any leads or tips on possibly completing an
interior in leather it would be greatly appreciated. Of course, there
are always the big companies that make them, but I would like to a
little "thriftier" than 1k per seat :-)

Regards,
Anthony Molle
Pincourt, Quebec


Differential brake pictures

n17pf <FisherPaul@...>
 

I finally got around to taking some pictures of my differential brakes
and posted them here:
http://picasaweb.google.com/rv7a.n18pf/Q200DifferentialBrakesN17PF
or here if the first one wraps:
http://tinyurl.com/2ssekr

Perhaps I waited long enough that nobody cares anymore. But this
topic does come up from time to time, so now I've got pictures!

Hopefully, winter is just about over and we'll get some decent flying
weather.

Paul A. Fisher
Q-200, N17PF ~1335 hours in ~17.5 years


Re: Airheart Brakes not releasing

Mike Dwyer <mdwyer@...>
 

This may not help but... I've found that the airheart wheel cylinders can be set up two ways and it's kinda hard to explain. Say the wheel cylinder is out and you tighten the two bolts that hold the caliper together onto the rotor, this pushes in the caliper piston. This is a bad thing as the wheel will drag severely. I either fully press the wheel caliper piston down with a C clamp or I insert a 1/8" piece of aluminum between the brake pad and wheel cylinder caliper, tighten the two bolts on the caliper to push the piston down a bit farther, then loosen to remove the aluminum shim. It may also be that you left out that little spacer on the caliper that gives a bit more room for the brake pads... I haven't been that high for years!
Good Luck,
Mike N3QP Q200


Paul Spackman wrote:

I ran into a problem with the Airheart master cylinder after a rebuild
the cup covers the Bypass Port and does not allow the brakes to release
but this only happens after I have been above 10-12k feet.

The Tol-O-Matic, current owner of Airheart, instructions say "adjust the
piston assembly to retract the cup further" but sheds no more light on
the subject. I will try contacting them tomorrow but they have not
responded to my questions in the past.

Has any body else ran into this?

Paul Spackman

Q2 Jabiru 3300


Re: Airheart Brakes not releasing

Who is this?
 

Paul

Kelly has 2 master cylinders that worked fine. I replaced them with toe
brakes. Im sure you could get one from him.

Dave


**************
It's Tax Time! Get tips, forms, and advice on AOL Money &amp;
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