Date   

Re: New Years

Kevin Boddicker
 

That a way Joseph.
Lead the way, and others will follow. Hopefully my admonishment will light some fires. Alan? Sam? Darrell? Sanjay? Jerry?Jon?
Seven new planes in 2011?
Couldn't help myself. :>))))
Kevin
On Jan 1, 2011, at 11:43 AM, Joseph M Snow wrote:

Hi Kevin,

I am moving up to high speed taxiing. Does 47 & 46 MPH qualify....? I guss not. Sam said I needed to do 50 mph while staying on the centerline. And. I want to feel confident I can do it repeatedly. You are driving a Tri-fear; I am doing a taildragger... I want to check my main wheels next week for any looseness and I have an oil leak at the right valve cover... Soon.

Joseph Snow
Q2xx, N240JS
Eculid, Ohio
www.corvairq.info

--- On Sat, 1/1/11, Kevin Boddicker <trumanst@...> wrote:

From: Kevin Boddicker <trumanst@...>
Subject: [Q-LIST] New Years
To: Q-LIST@...
Date: Saturday, January 1, 2011, 10:12 AM



Happy New Year to everyone.
I recall hearing that in 2010 there would be a great multitude of first flights. I am still listening!!! I can't hear you!!!
I am sure none of our group has a hangover today, so get your asses out in the shop and get to work!!
MUST I NAME NAMES? I THINK WE KNOW WHO WE ARE!
Wishing everyone all the best in 2011. Seriously, get the damned thing done. It is great fun. If you need any help, just ask, someone will respond.
This is the year to FLY. Were not getting any younger!!!!!!

Warmest Regards,

Kevin Boddicker
TriQ 200 N7868B 194 hrs
Luana, IA.

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Benefits of streamlining Happy New Year

One Sky Dog
 

Jim,
The plane is pretty much together. The last position light was wired in
today and the landing light was final mounted and the lens put on.

The panel has to come off to be anodized and then the switch harness can
be put in and a couple of more wires in the panel and it is done. I will
then put power to the circuits for checkout do final timing, WT & balance then
ready to start.

Getting Closer,
Charlie Johnson
Ogden, Utah

Watch your 6 KB

In a message dated 1/1/2011 12:01:40 P.M. Mountain Standard Time,
logistics_engineering@... writes:


Charlie, you are right. They do become lawn darts when pointed straight
down. The max speed my airframe has ever seen is around 240 mph during
testing.

Are you running your new engine yet?
JP


Re: Benefits of streamlining Happy New Year

Jim Patillo
 

Charlie, you are right. They do become lawn darts when pointed straight down. The max speed my airframe has ever seen is around 240 mph during testing.

Are you running your new engine yet?
JP

--- In Q-LIST@..., oneskydog@... wrote:

Clive,

Some one could do the dive test with a GPS to plot the L/D = Velocity h/
Velocity v = slope of the exponential curve. Point one straight down I think
the wall will be a lot higher than 220 MPH. I have been at 180 indicated
in my old Dragonfly coming down final for a low pass with 55 hp. Low drag
and cubic horsepower proceeded by cubic dollars equal winning plane. Just my
$.02 and opinion not backed by facts.

Regards,

Charlie Johnson, Dragonfly builder
Ogden, Utah


In a message dated 1/1/2011 4:38:50 A.M. Mountain Standard Time,
gobxoy@... writes:


There's no doubt drag is critical but if it's ones goal to have the
lightest and cleanest Q in the air, one should start that concept from the
first layup, not at the end of the project. Again, given the available engines
and HP, I believe this plane hits the wall at around 215-220 MPH no matter
what you do. Unlike Klaus' EZE , this airframe is not nearly as clean. If
Sam or anyone else for that matter ever goes faster than that, I'm all ears.



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Benefits of streamlining Happy New Year

Jim Patillo
 

Happy New Year Clive,

I'm not confusing anything aero or othewize, please reread my email. As soon as anyone demonstrates they can consistantly cruise their Q at 200 MPH + I'll be all over it. BTW, the JimBob Six Pack has proven itself over and over for many years now. At this stage, people either get it or they don't. So you can dangle what ever you want from the back and its OK.

You are correct, my plane weighs 775 lbs. If you ever saw it up close and personal you would understand why. I built it with the intention of having a fast, clean looking show plane and that's what I got. I wanted a production looking airplane, not one that looked like it was hatched in a back yard. In retrospect, I would have done it the same way.

Best regards and now.............. go FLY!

Jim Patillo
N46JP
Q200

P.S.Flew to Truckee, CA (Reno)in the Sierras yesterday. Lots of snow in them thar hills.

--- In Q-LIST@..., "Clive" <gobxoy@...> wrote:

Hi Jim
Missed your last reply(away for the Hols)
Appologies, should have said dangley tailwheels.
It,s the tailwheel in the slipstream that does the damage aerowise, that's why mine is tucked up behind the fin as much as possible.
Lets not confuse aero for convinence, thats a personal prefrence.
The original tail wheel geometry was just plain wrong exaberbated when pointing the tailwheel down to get the correct ground angle.
When the geometry is corrected they can be made to work just dandy, but without the kickout mode. Again PP.
I would agree that the average Q2-200 is not as clean as a Klaus' Varieze, but are closer than you give credit and can be made realy quite good. Check out the sq plate area in the old cafe 400's Sheehan at one point showed less than Hertzler.
Klaus's engine is anything from standard, aswell as a very clean airframe, but you got to admitt their bow main gear ahead of the prop arc hurts them alot.
If you want to go fast it's not just drag and weight that's critical how about horse power?
Klaus has the lot, and has spent alot of time/money to get there.
Sam handicaped himself in the last race IMHO, no offence Sam.
BTW what weight is your Q Jim I think I have you at approx 775 lbs empty?
Happy new year
Clive ... Gobxoy


--- In Q-LIST@..., "Jim P" <logistics_engineering@> wrote:


Hi Clive,

Me and many others have had that "aftermarket" tailwheel installed for a very long time and as far as I know everyone flying it, is happy. I haven't heard one complaint. For me, I'm willing to trade a couple of knots for convienence. "Turns on one main (with dual brakes), unlatching the full swivel allows the plane to be handled much more easily on the ground, also allows for canard incidence adjustment, more beefy and better control down the runway.

The video Sam provided shows "things" laid across the airstream and I can see that drag, but what happens when you turn that rod in line and flow air over it lengthwize? What kind of drag does that create? NOT MUCH. The vertical area of the tailwheel on the other hand does create drag but so does the original tailwheel.

There's no doubt drag is critical but if it's ones goal to have the lightest and cleanest Q in the air, one should start that concept from the first layup, not at the end of the project. Again, given the available engines and HP, I believe this plane hits the wall at around 215-220 MPH no matter what you do. Unlike Klaus' EZE , this airframe is not nearly as clean. If Sam or anyone else for that matter ever goes faster than that, I'm all ears.

Merry Christmas

Jim Patillo - Going out for another flight over Yosemite this AM. Its beautiful up there. We're really fortunate out here with all the great flying days.



--- In Q-LIST@..., "Clive" <gobxoy@> wrote:

Nice one Sam,

That certainly puts drag into perspective.

Looks those aftermarket tails wheels that hang down are a high drag item.

Merry Christmas all.

Clive Gobxoy

--- In Q-LIST@..., oneskydog@ wrote:

Especially propellers


In a message dated 12/21/2010 9:33:11 A.M. Mountain Standard Time,
dmperry1012@ writes:

Wow! Thank you, Sam. Great Video.

I noticed the sound level went up as the drag went up -- if it's making
noise it's making drag.

Mike Perry






Re: New Years

Joseph M Snow <1flashq@...>
 

Hi Kevin,
 
I am moving up to high speed taxiing.  Does 47 & 46 MPH qualify....?  I guss not.  Sam said I needed to do 50 mph while staying on the centerline.  And. I want to feel confident I can do it repeatedly.  You are driving a Tri-fear; I am doing a taildragger...   I want to check my main wheels next week for any looseness and I have an oil leak at the right valve cover...  Soon.
 
Joseph Snow
Q2xx, N240JS
Eculid, Ohio
www.corvairq.info

--- On Sat, 1/1/11, Kevin Boddicker <trumanst@...> wrote:


From: Kevin Boddicker <trumanst@...>
Subject: [Q-LIST] New Years
To: Q-LIST@...
Date: Saturday, January 1, 2011, 10:12 AM


 



Happy New Year to everyone.
I recall hearing that in 2010 there would be a great multitude of first flights. I am still listening!!! I can't hear you!!!
I am sure none of our group has a hangover today, so get your asses out in the shop and get to work!!
MUST I NAME NAMES? I THINK WE KNOW WHO WE ARE!
Wishing everyone all the best in 2011. Seriously, get the damned thing done. It is great fun. If you need any help, just ask, someone will respond.
This is the year to FLY. Were not getting any younger!!!!!!

Warmest Regards,

Kevin Boddicker
TriQ 200 N7868B 194 hrs
Luana, IA.








[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Tail Spring

Terry Crouch
 

Try _http://www.langair.com/index.html_ (http://www.langair.com/index.html)
he will build what ever you want with proper material and heat treat.

Terry Crouch

In a message dated 12/31/2010 8:53:11 A.M. Central Standard Time,
mskiby@... writes:

I know this one has been talked about a bunch. Can someone tell me where
the best place would be to get a steel tail spring for a Q200? I looked at
the Great planes site and they have one that looks ok. I had one years ago
that we removed from my first q200 when doing the Tri Gear conversion, but I
can't find the darn thing!

Thanks team.


Re: Working with Phenolic

Mike Dwyer <mdwyer@...>
 

A bunch of us have over a thousand hours on the phenolic with no measurable wear... Why bother improving this area? Unless you want to spend 10 years building...
Mike Q200

Martin wrote:

My thought would be to oversize the hole in the phenolic and flox the rulon into place. Those who have installed these please ring in.

Thanks

--- In Q-LIST@..., Mike Evans <rranch524@...> wrote:

I needed to replace a broken CS7? for the aileron. I bought a sheet of 1/4"
phenolic from A/S, then remembered someone mentioned Step drills. I saw
them in Harbor Freight and bought a set. They are really neat. Perfectly
round holes! I did find the the 3/4" step was a little over-sized, so I
started over with the next smaller step and the took a few thousands off
with some sandpaper.

I would like to consider using rulon also, but I'm not sure how they would
"fit" into the phenolic structure.

Mike Evans, Tri-Q200 building slowly






------------------------------------

Quickie Builders Association WEB site
http://www.quickiebuilders.org

Yahoo! Groups Links





New Years

Kevin Boddicker
 

Happy New Year to everyone.
I recall hearing that in 2010 there would be a great multitude of first flights. I am still listening!!! I can't hear you!!!
I am sure none of our group has a hangover today, so get your asses out in the shop and get to work!!
MUST I NAME NAMES? I THINK WE KNOW WHO WE ARE!
Wishing everyone all the best in 2011. Seriously, get the damned thing done. It is great fun. If you need any help, just ask, someone will respond.
This is the year to FLY. Were not getting any younger!!!!!!

Warmest Regards,

Kevin Boddicker
TriQ 200 N7868B 194 hrs
Luana, IA.


Re: Benefits of streamlining Happy New Year

Clive Clapham
 

Hi Jim
Missed your last reply(away for the Hols)
Appologies, should have said dangley tailwheels.
It,s the tailwheel in the slipstream that does the damage aerowise, that's why mine is tucked up behind the fin as much as possible.
Lets not confuse aero for convinence, thats a personal prefrence.
The original tail wheel geometry was just plain wrong exaberbated when pointing the tailwheel down to get the correct ground angle.
When the geometry is corrected they can be made to work just dandy, but without the kickout mode. Again PP.
I would agree that the average Q2-200 is not as clean as a Klaus' Varieze, but are closer than you give credit and can be made realy quite good. Check out the sq plate area in the old cafe 400's Sheehan at one point showed less than Hertzler.
Klaus's engine is anything from standard, aswell as a very clean airframe, but you got to admitt their bow main gear ahead of the prop arc hurts them alot.
If you want to go fast it's not just drag and weight that's critical how about horse power?
Klaus has the lot, and has spent alot of time/money to get there.
Sam handicaped himself in the last race IMHO, no offence Sam.
BTW what weight is your Q Jim I think I have you at approx 775 lbs empty?
Happy new year
Clive ... Gobxoy


--- In Q-LIST@..., "Jim P" <logistics_engineering@...> wrote:


Hi Clive,

Me and many others have had that "aftermarket" tailwheel installed for a very long time and as far as I know everyone flying it, is happy. I haven't heard one complaint. For me, I'm willing to trade a couple of knots for convienence. "Turns on one main (with dual brakes), unlatching the full swivel allows the plane to be handled much more easily on the ground, also allows for canard incidence adjustment, more beefy and better control down the runway.

The video Sam provided shows "things" laid across the airstream and I can see that drag, but what happens when you turn that rod in line and flow air over it lengthwize? What kind of drag does that create? NOT MUCH. The vertical area of the tailwheel on the other hand does create drag but so does the original tailwheel.

There's no doubt drag is critical but if it's ones goal to have the lightest and cleanest Q in the air, one should start that concept from the first layup, not at the end of the project. Again, given the available engines and HP, I believe this plane hits the wall at around 215-220 MPH no matter what you do. Unlike Klaus' EZE , this airframe is not nearly as clean. If Sam or anyone else for that matter ever goes faster than that, I'm all ears.

Merry Christmas

Jim Patillo - Going out for another flight over Yosemite this AM. Its beautiful up there. We're really fortunate out here with all the great flying days.



--- In Q-LIST@..., "Clive" <gobxoy@> wrote:

Nice one Sam,

That certainly puts drag into perspective.

Looks those aftermarket tails wheels that hang down are a high drag item.

Merry Christmas all.

Clive Gobxoy

--- In Q-LIST@..., oneskydog@ wrote:

Especially propellers


In a message dated 12/21/2010 9:33:11 A.M. Mountain Standard Time,
dmperry1012@ writes:

Wow! Thank you, Sam. Great Video.

I noticed the sound level went up as the drag went up -- if it's making
noise it's making drag.

Mike Perry






Re: Benefits of streamlining Happy New Year

One Sky Dog
 

Clive,

Some one could do the dive test with a GPS to plot the L/D = Velocity h/
Velocity v = slope of the exponential curve. Point one straight down I think
the wall will be a lot higher than 220 MPH. I have been at 180 indicated
in my old Dragonfly coming down final for a low pass with 55 hp. Low drag
and cubic horsepower proceeded by cubic dollars equal winning plane. Just my
$.02 and opinion not backed by facts.

Regards,

Charlie Johnson, Dragonfly builder
Ogden, Utah


In a message dated 1/1/2011 4:38:50 A.M. Mountain Standard Time,
gobxoy@... writes:


There's no doubt drag is critical but if it's ones goal to have the
lightest and cleanest Q in the air, one should start that concept from the
first layup, not at the end of the project. Again, given the available engines
and HP, I believe this plane hits the wall at around 215-220 MPH no matter
what you do. Unlike Klaus' EZE , this airframe is not nearly as clean. If
Sam or anyone else for that matter ever goes faster than that, I'm all ears.


Tail Spring

Martin Skiby
 

I know this one has been talked about a bunch. Can someone tell me where the best place would be to get a steel tail spring for a Q200? I looked at the Great planes site and they have one that looks ok. I had one years ago that we removed from my first q200 when doing the Tri Gear conversion, but I can't find the darn thing!

Thanks team.


Re: Working with Phenolic

Martin Skiby
 

My thought would be to oversize the hole in the phenolic and flox the rulon into place. Those who have installed these please ring in.

Thanks

--- In Q-LIST@..., Mike Evans <rranch524@...> wrote:

I needed to replace a broken CS7? for the aileron. I bought a sheet of 1/4"
phenolic from A/S, then remembered someone mentioned Step drills. I saw
them in Harbor Freight and bought a set. They are really neat. Perfectly
round holes! I did find the the 3/4" step was a little over-sized, so I
started over with the next smaller step and the took a few thousands off
with some sandpaper.

I would like to consider using rulon also, but I'm not sure how they would
"fit" into the phenolic structure.

Mike Evans, Tri-Q200 building slowly


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Working with Phenolic

Mike Evans
 

I needed to replace a broken CS7? for the aileron. I bought a sheet of 1/4"
phenolic from A/S, then remembered someone mentioned Step drills. I saw
them in Harbor Freight and bought a set. They are really neat. Perfectly
round holes! I did find the the 3/4" step was a little over-sized, so I
started over with the next smaller step and the took a few thousands off
with some sandpaper.

I would like to consider using rulon also, but I'm not sure how they would
"fit" into the phenolic structure.

Mike Evans, Tri-Q200 building slowly


Re: Working with Phenolic

Jim Patillo
 

Hi Sam,

I use them on both the pivot end and (inset) in the inboard phenolic bearings so contact points are all in Rulon.

Happy holidays!
Jim P.

--- In Q-LIST@..., Sam Hoskins <sam.hoskins@...> wrote:

Hi Jim. Are you talking about rulon for the pivot end or the inboard side? I
believeMartin was asking about the inboard phenolic bearings.

Sam



Sent via mobile.
On Dec 30, 2010 1:05 PM, "Jim P" <logistics_engineering@...> wrote:

Martin,

I believe I'm the guy that pioneered the use of Rulon bushings on Quickies
several years ago and proved that it works. The steel bushings wore out and
I did not want to replace them with like. Many on this list have done the
same with similar results. These bushings can be used on the elevator,
control rods, aileron and rudder pivots.

Someone on this list can provide you with the specifics.



Jim Patillo
N46JP
Q200

Heading to the airport for a trip to Reno this morning.

P.S. Never heard back from you from last conversation regarding giving
your son a ride in Livermore.





--- In Q-LIST@..., "Martin" <mskiby@> wrote:

There are several pieces of Phenolic that are missing out of the kit that
I just purchased. I know that I can make them from sheet, but wanted to ask
the group the best way to do so. Is it better to have it machined so that
the fit would be the most accurate for the control tubes or can this be done
adequately with a normal drill press and sharp bits? Also is there anyone
that is currently fabricating these parts as I am also missing some of the
bushings for the control tubes and hinge points.

Thanks

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Working with Phenolic

Sam Hoskins
 

Hi Jim. Are you talking about rulon for the pivot end or the inboard side? I
believeMartin was asking about the inboard phenolic bearings.

Sam



Sent via mobile.
On Dec 30, 2010 1:05 PM, "Jim P" <logistics_engineering@...> wrote:

Martin,

I believe I'm the guy that pioneered the use of Rulon bushings on Quickies
several years ago and proved that it works. The steel bushings wore out and
I did not want to replace them with like. Many on this list have done the
same with similar results. These bushings can be used on the elevator,
control rods, aileron and rudder pivots.

Someone on this list can provide you with the specifics.



Jim Patillo
N46JP
Q200

Heading to the airport for a trip to Reno this morning.

P.S. Never heard back from you from last conversation regarding giving
your son a ride in Livermore.





--- In Q-LIST@..., "Martin" <mskiby@...> wrote:

There are several pieces of Phenolic that are missing out of the kit that
I just purchased. I know that I can make them from sheet, but wanted to ask
the group the best way to do so. Is it better to have it machined so that
the fit would be the most accurate for the control tubes or can this be done
adequately with a normal drill press and sharp bits? Also is there anyone
that is currently fabricating these parts as I am also missing some of the
bushings for the control tubes and hinge points.

Thanks


Re: Working with Phenolic

Martin Skiby
 

Yes I would love to take you up on the offer for a ride. With the Holidays and
bad weather here we ahve just had to push it out. He is trying to schedule his
check ride and finding a day to get up to Livermore has been tough. Thanks for
the reminder and I will chat with you off line to put it together.

Thanks very much.

--- In Q-LIST@..., "Jim P" <logistics_engineering@...> wrote:


Martin,

I believe I'm the guy that pioneered the use of Rulon bushings on Quickies several years ago and proved that it works. The steel bushings wore out and I did not want to replace them with like. Many on this list have done the same with similar results. These bushings can be used on the elevator, control rods, aileron and rudder pivots.

Someone on this list can provide you with the specifics.



Jim Patillo
N46JP
Q200

Heading to the airport for a trip to Reno this morning.

P.S. Never heard back from you from last conversation regarding giving your son a ride in Livermore.





--- In Q-LIST@..., "Martin" <mskiby@> wrote:

There are several pieces of Phenolic that are missing out of the kit that I just purchased. I know that I can make them from sheet, but wanted to ask the group the best way to do so. Is it better to have it machined so that the fit would be the most accurate for the control tubes or can this be done adequately with a normal drill press and sharp bits? Also is there anyone that is currently fabricating these parts as I am also missing some of the bushings for the control tubes and hinge points.

Thanks


Re: Working with Phenolic

Martin Skiby
 

These look good and would be easily installed as long as they come in the correct sizes.

Thanks Dan, Saved me some work right here. Glad to have this group.

Thanks all.

--- In Q-LIST@..., dan@... wrote:

Several people are using Rulon to replace the pivot bushings. Your
mileage may vary, but you can find them on Amazon here:

http://tinyurl.com/286kwhq

Cheers,
Dan Yager
QBA Editor
www.quickheads.com




The pre-drilled holes on the QAC supplied phenolic were reamed. This
gives
them a more precise dimension that just using a drill press and twist
drills.

The problem comes with using the larger drill diameters required for the
bellcranks. Check around with your buddies, and maybe you can find the
right size reamers. You can also check Ebay.

You son't need superduper expensive ones, since you have just a couple of
holes to ream.

Sam Hoskins
Murphysboro, IL



On Thu, Dec 30, 2010 at 9:58 AM, Martin <mskiby@...> wrote:



There are several pieces of Phenolic that are missing out of the kit
that I
just purchased. I know that I can make them from sheet, but wanted to
ask
the group the best way to do so. Is it better to have it machined so
that
the fit would be the most accurate for the control tubes or can this be
done
adequately with a normal drill press and sharp bits? Also is there
anyone
that is currently fabricating these parts as I am also missing some of
the
bushings for the control tubes and hinge points.

Thanks







------------------------------------

Quickie Builders Association WEB site
http://www.quickiebuilders.org

Yahoo! Groups Links




Re: Working with Phenolic

Martin Skiby
 

Thanks Sam, Good advise. I have some folks to call on for this.

--- In Q-LIST@..., Sam Hoskins <sam.hoskins@...> wrote:

The pre-drilled holes on the QAC supplied phenolic were reamed. This gives
them a more precise dimension that just using a drill press and twist
drills.

The problem comes with using the larger drill diameters required for the
bellcranks. Check around with your buddies, and maybe you can find the
right size reamers. You can also check Ebay.

You son't need superduper expensive ones, since you have just a couple of
holes to ream.

Sam Hoskins
Murphysboro, IL



On Thu, Dec 30, 2010 at 9:58 AM, Martin <mskiby@...> wrote:



There are several pieces of Phenolic that are missing out of the kit that I
just purchased. I know that I can make them from sheet, but wanted to ask
the group the best way to do so. Is it better to have it machined so that
the fit would be the most accurate for the control tubes or can this be done
adequately with a normal drill press and sharp bits? Also is there anyone
that is currently fabricating these parts as I am also missing some of the
bushings for the control tubes and hinge points.

Thanks



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Working with Phenolic

Jim Patillo
 

Martin,

I believe I'm the guy that pioneered the use of Rulon bushings on Quickies several years ago and proved that it works. The steel bushings wore out and I did not want to replace them with like. Many on this list have done the same with similar results. These bushings can be used on the elevator, control rods, aileron and rudder pivots.

Someone on this list can provide you with the specifics.



Jim Patillo
N46JP
Q200

Heading to the airport for a trip to Reno this morning.

P.S. Never heard back from you from last conversation regarding giving your son a ride in Livermore.

--- In Q-LIST@..., "Martin" <mskiby@...> wrote:

There are several pieces of Phenolic that are missing out of the kit that I just purchased. I know that I can make them from sheet, but wanted to ask the group the best way to do so. Is it better to have it machined so that the fit would be the most accurate for the control tubes or can this be done adequately with a normal drill press and sharp bits? Also is there anyone that is currently fabricating these parts as I am also missing some of the bushings for the control tubes and hinge points.

Thanks


Re: Working with Phenolic

quickheads
 

Several people are using Rulon to replace the pivot bushings. Your
mileage may vary, but you can find them on Amazon here:

http://tinyurl.com/286kwhq

Cheers,
Dan Yager
QBA Editor
www.quickheads.com

The pre-drilled holes on the QAC supplied phenolic were reamed. This
gives
them a more precise dimension that just using a drill press and twist
drills.

The problem comes with using the larger drill diameters required for the
bellcranks. Check around with your buddies, and maybe you can find the
right size reamers. You can also check Ebay.

You son't need superduper expensive ones, since you have just a couple of
holes to ream.

Sam Hoskins
Murphysboro, IL



On Thu, Dec 30, 2010 at 9:58 AM, Martin <mskiby@...> wrote:



There are several pieces of Phenolic that are missing out of the kit
that I
just purchased. I know that I can make them from sheet, but wanted to
ask
the group the best way to do so. Is it better to have it machined so
that
the fit would be the most accurate for the control tubes or can this be
done
adequately with a normal drill press and sharp bits? Also is there
anyone
that is currently fabricating these parts as I am also missing some of
the
bushings for the control tubes and hinge points.

Thanks







------------------------------------

Quickie Builders Association WEB site
http://www.quickiebuilders.org

Yahoo! Groups Links



18561 - 18580 of 55652