Date   

Re: LS1 Foam Layout. . .

One Sky Dog
 

Hey Dan,

In aircraft location Stations = distance from 0.0 (X) to item from nose to
tail, Butt lines = Distance from centerline out toward wing tips (Y),
Waterline = Distance in vertical from a known reference there is only one
Waterline 0.0. All waterlines are level by definition (Z), All stations and butt
lines are perpendicular to the waterline. 0,0,0 is where ever QAC decided
and should be specified on the plan.

Perfect cores are the start to a perfect wing.

Regards,

Charlie Johnson
Ogden, Utah

In a message dated 7/7/2011 7:18:27 A.M. Mountain Daylight Time,
dan@... writes:

Thanks for the response Sam, I appreciate it. Not sure if my original
question made any sense though. ;-) I'll try again.

"Level Lines" - to me this means that you level a template on one end
of the foam block. (L.E. to T.E.)

"Water Lines" - to me this means that two separate templates are at the
same height on opposite ends of the foam block.

I was just wondering if the "Level Lines" indicated on the templates,
were also "Water Lines." (Or if it matters.)

Does that make sense? Please let me know. Again, I'm guessing that
you had to sand and futz with the cores to get them to all fit together
properly.

Thanks again,
Dan Yager
QBA Editor
www.quickheads.com





On Thu, 7 Jul 2011 07:38:38 -0500, Sam Hoskins wrote:
Dan - if I recall, you square the TE of the block and you line up the
templates with TE. That establishes the sweep for the LE.

The lines on the templates must be level when you hot wire them and
then
must be accurately transferred to the foam after they have been cut
out.
Water lines/level lines, I believe we are talking about the same
thing.

Does this answer your questions?

Sam



------------------------------------

Quickie Builders Association WEB site
http://www.quickiebuilders.org

Yahoo! Groups Links


Re: Jim Patillo fuel system

Clive Clapham
 

Hi

G-BXOY has the top mounted flush filler, works great. Jims idea good too. Mine has a stand pipe directly below the filler cap with hole cut at top to work as standard standpipe (overflow) all within the header. Only thing I would change be to make the stand pipe from top to entery into main lager diameter or split to allow air to escape quicker to speed up filling. NB the fuel system is ram air presurised so must be leak free. There is an advantage of top mounted filler if the cap is left of it's you know on climb out. I sure would love to see the picks of Jims( Sam or Jim any chance of posting then or sennding off line?) If any one asks I can post pic of header tank before glassinig in.

Clive ......GOBXY

--- In Q-LIST@..., dan@... wrote:

Jay,
I have a couple of close-up shots of Jim's header tank filler located
here:

http://www.quickheads.com/images/stories/galleries/livermore2010/livermore_3646.jpg
http://www.quickheads.com/images/stories/galleries/livermore2010/livermore_3647.jpg

Not sure if that helps any.

Cheers,
Dan Yager
QAB Editor
www.quickheads.com




On Tue, 05 Jul 2011 04:09:57 -0000, scheevel@... wrote:
Hi Jim,

It has been a few years since I saw your plane. I was looking at the
video of your walk around on the Q-tube and I noticed that you have a
flush mount filler cap near the center of the header on top and in
front of the glass. I am planning out my fuel tank plumbing now and
am
considering doing something like this. Can you tell me how that
filler
fits (where/how deep) into the header? Also, if you only fill from
the
header, how does it feed into the main? Thanks for your help. I am
sure you have been asked this before, but I could not find it in the
archives.

Cheers,
Jay Scheevel -- Tri-Q still building


LS1 Foam Layout. . .

quickheads
 

You've got to love QAC. . .

I have been working with a set of LS1 templates and trying to figure out how they get lined up on the ends of the foam blocks.

The LS1 instructions say to use the same block sizes called out in the Q2 plans, but the angles generated don't really match the sweep of the LS1 canard. So how do you know where to place the templates horizontally on the blocks.

Also, on page 3-6 of the Q2 plans it calls the "level Lines" drawn on the templates "Water Lines" does this mean that the "Level Lines" on the templates are placed at the same level vertically on the ends of the foam blocks as well as being "level"? Or is this just an artifact from the VariEZ plans that got copied and pasted into the Q2 plans?

I'm guessing that you Q-200 (and Q1 LS1) guys had a lot of futzing around to do in order to get your cores to fit on the spars. Let me know how you did it! I appreciate your experience.

Thanks,
Dan Yager
QBA Editor
www.quickheads.com


Re: fitting the cowl

Terry Crouch
 

Hi Jon,

I just made the edge of the cowl straight. With cowl screwed in place,
Duct taped the cowl edge for paint clearance and release then filled the gap
with filler. Guaranteed perfect gap.

Terry Crouch
Quickie N14TC

In a message dated 7/6/2011 10:00:28 P.M. Central Daylight Time,
swensgoldflyer@... writes:

I am fitting the cowl I fabricated to fit the Corvair engine to the
fuselage of my TriQ and I am wondering if there is any finishing techniques to
make the seam nice and even. I am sanding the cowl slowly and fitting it as I
go but the edge of the firewall is not perfectly even so the joint is not
pretty. Any builder hints or help will be greatly appreciated.

Jon Swenson
TriQvair2


Re: Fuel lines

John Loram <johnl@...>
 

The last line should have read: "p.s. Tygon is a trade name for various
kinds of tubing, not all of THEM polyurethane."


_____

From: Q-LIST@... [mailto:Q-LIST@...] On Behalf Of
John Loram
Sent: Wednesday, July 06, 2011 4:09 PM
To: Q-LIST@...
Subject: [Q-LIST] Fuel lines




There are two types of polyurethane tubing: Ether based and Ester based.
The Ether based tubing is what you want. The Ester based tubing breaks down
when exposed to moisture (water in fuel, high humidity, etc.). Here's more:
http://www.apextrusion.com/polyurethane-tubing.html

If I recall correctly Bob Farnam told me the Ether based tubing in his plane
is over 10 years old with no signs of deterioration.

The maintenance manual for my C182 reads as follows: "Replace
flammable-fluid carrying rubber hoses every 5 years".

-john-
p.s. Tygon is a trade name for various kinds of tubing, not all of the
polyurethane.

-----Original Message-----


fitting the cowl

Jon Swenson
 

I am fitting the cowl I fabricated to fit the Corvair engine to the fuselage of my TriQ and I am wondering if there is any finishing techniques to make the seam nice and even. I am sanding the cowl slowly and fitting it as I go but the edge of the firewall is not perfectly even so the joint is not pretty. Any builder hints or help will be greatly appreciated.

Jon Swenson
TriQvair2


Fuel lines

John Loram <johnl@...>
 

There are two types of polyurethane tubing: Ether based and Ester based.
The Ether based tubing is what you want. The Ester based tubing breaks down
when exposed to moisture (water in fuel, high humidity, etc.). Here's more:
http://www.apextrusion.com/polyurethane-tubing.html

If I recall correctly Bob Farnam told me the Ether based tubing in his plane
is over 10 years old with no signs of deterioration.

The maintenance manual for my C182 reads as follows: "Replace
flammable-fluid carrying rubber hoses every 5 years".

-john-
p.s. Tygon is a trade name for various kinds of tubing, not all of the
polyurethane.

-----Original Message-----
From: Q-LIST@... [mailto:Q-LIST@...]
On Behalf Of Sam Hoskins
Sent: Wednesday, July 06, 2011 5:14 AM
To: Q-LIST@...
Subject: Fuel lines, was [Q-LIST] First flight

In complete deference to my friend John, whom I know is an
expert in urethane and knows more about the subject than the
bare inkling that I will ever have, I have been using
urethane tubing with great success for most of the life of my
Q-200. Maybe it's the formulation that makes the difference.

I started out with Tygon, which was better then the original
vinyl tubing that QAC supplied. The Tygon was okay, then I
stumbled across this stuff called *Tygothane, *which is much better.

I get it here:
http://www.mcmaster.com/#tygothane-c-544-a-i.b.-tubing-and-tyg
othane-hose/=d22kke
I
think Wicks and Spruce carries it, also.

I like it because is has a smaller OD than the rubber, is
easy to work with, and I can see the fuel inside. This stuff
is really tough and abrasive resistant and holds up to 100LL
for a long time. I seem to change it out every 5-7 years for
no other reason than to be on the safe side.

Just my experience.

Sam





On Wed, Jul 6, 2011 at 4:47 AM, John Cartledge
<urecomps@...>wrote:

**


Sanjay,
I would use rubber tubing instead of urethane tubing for fuel lines.
We have seen some bad instances here in Australia of urethane fuel
tubing degrading ( hydrolysis) and fuel sloshing around the
cockpit of
a Glassair 3 in flight. This degradation is particularly
bad in humid,
high temprature environments. Fly carefully and enjoy. John VH LOQ
Q200 John Cartledge Director Urethane Compounds Pty Ltd

----- Original Message -----
From: Sanjay Dhall
To: Q-LIST@...
Sent: Tuesday, July 05, 2011 10:36 PM
Subject: RE: [Q-LIST] First flight

Paul, congratulations on 14 years. I too flew on July 4, my
5th hour.
Now I have been attempting to replace the fuel filters, but
am having
considerable trouble removing the filters. Since I have
used urethane
tubing for all the plumbing, it appears very hard to pull free from
the barb ends, once the hose clamps are removed. Is there a
trick to
pulling tubing off of barb fittings?
thanks
Sanjay

_____

From: Q-LIST@...
[mailto:Q-LIST@...] On Behalf
Of Paul S
Sent: Monday, July 04, 2011 9:00 AM
To: Q-LIST@...
Subject: [Q-LIST] First flight

It was 14 years ago today that I made my first flight, I am
headed out
to make a flight to celebrate that event.

Thnx for the posts about your flights Sanjay, it has
reminded me of my
experience back then. Have you changed you fuel filter yet?
The tanks
are never as clean as we think they are. Guess why I've
brought this
up. I suggest changing the filters every five hours until you find
nothing in them when you pull them apart.

Happy Birthday USA and congratulations Sanjay.

Paul











------------------------------------

Quickie Builders Association WEB site
http://www.quickiebuilders.org

Yahoo! Groups Links




(No subject)

quickieflying
 


Re: N1711Q Update

Dave Dugas
 

Rick
Engine sounds good....just be careful pointing your plane into a hangar with people around.  Congratulations.
Dave D

--- On Tue, 7/5/11, dan@... <dan@...> wrote:


From: dan@... <dan@...>
Subject: Re: [Q-LIST] N1711Q Update
To: Q-LIST@...
Date: Tuesday, July 5, 2011, 10:55 PM


 



Hey Rick,
Q-tube is working fine again. It's located here:

http://www.quickheads.com/q-tube/frontpage.html

You need to be logged-in to the website in order to upload videos
directly to the site. Let me know if you have problems. In the
meantime, I'll check out the VIMEO version. Nice work!

Cheers,
Dan Yager
QBA Editor
www.quickheads.com

We have a nice video of the event to post. I remember the video
upload was
in limbo for a while and I do not see it on the website now. When
downloads
are possible I will post it. Meanwhile when video rendering
completes I
will post it on Vimeo and you can look at it there.

Rick Hole

N1711Q going flying in just a few more days


Fuel lines, was First flight

Sam Hoskins
 

In complete deference to my friend John, whom I know is an expert in
urethane and knows more about the subject than the bare inkling that I will
ever have, I have been using urethane tubing with great success for most of
the life of my Q-200. Maybe it's the formulation that makes the difference.

I started out with Tygon, which was better then the original vinyl tubing
that QAC supplied. The Tygon was okay, then I stumbled across this stuff
called *Tygothane, *which is much better.

I get it here:
http://www.mcmaster.com/#tygothane-c-544-a-i.b.-tubing-and-tygothane-hose/=d22kke
I
think Wicks and Spruce carries it, also.

I like it because is has a smaller OD than the rubber, is easy to work with,
and I can see the fuel inside. This stuff is really tough and abrasive
resistant and holds up to 100LL for a long time. I seem to change it out
every 5-7 years for no other reason than to be on the safe side.

Just my experience.

Sam





On Wed, Jul 6, 2011 at 4:47 AM, John Cartledge <urecomps@...>wrote:

**


Sanjay,
I would use rubber tubing instead of urethane tubing for fuel lines.
We have seen some bad instances here in Australia of urethane fuel tubing
degrading ( hydrolysis) and fuel sloshing around the cockpit of a Glassair 3
in flight. This degradation is particularly bad in humid, high temprature
environments. Fly carefully and enjoy. John
VH LOQ Q200
John Cartledge
Director
Urethane Compounds Pty Ltd

----- Original Message -----
From: Sanjay Dhall
To: Q-LIST@...
Sent: Tuesday, July 05, 2011 10:36 PM
Subject: RE: [Q-LIST] First flight

Paul, congratulations on 14 years. I too flew on July 4, my 5th hour.
Now I have been attempting to replace the fuel filters, but am having
considerable trouble removing the filters. Since I have used urethane
tubing
for all the plumbing, it appears very hard to pull free from the barb ends,
once the hose clamps are removed. Is there a trick to pulling tubing off of
barb fittings?
thanks
Sanjay

_____

From: Q-LIST@... [mailto:Q-LIST@...] On Behalf Of
Paul S
Sent: Monday, July 04, 2011 9:00 AM
To: Q-LIST@...
Subject: [Q-LIST] First flight

It was 14 years ago today that I made my first flight, I am headed out to
make a flight to celebrate that event.

Thnx for the posts about your flights Sanjay, it has reminded me of my
experience back then. Have you changed you fuel filter yet? The tanks are
never as clean as we think they are. Guess why I've brought this up. I
suggest changing the filters every five hours until you find nothing in
them
when you pull them apart.

Happy Birthday USA and congratulations Sanjay.

Paul

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: First flight

John Cartledge <urecomps@...>
 

Sanjay,
I would use rubber tubing instead of urethane tubing for fuel lines.
We have seen some bad instances here in Australia of urethane fuel tubing degrading ( hydrolysis) and fuel sloshing around the cockpit of a Glassair 3 in flight. This degradation is particularly bad in humid, high temprature environments. Fly carefully and enjoy. John
VH LOQ Q200
John Cartledge
Director
Urethane Compounds Pty Ltd

----- Original Message -----
From: Sanjay Dhall
To: Q-LIST@...
Sent: Tuesday, July 05, 2011 10:36 PM
Subject: RE: [Q-LIST] First flight



Paul, congratulations on 14 years. I too flew on July 4, my 5th hour.
Now I have been attempting to replace the fuel filters, but am having
considerable trouble removing the filters. Since I have used urethane tubing
for all the plumbing, it appears very hard to pull free from the barb ends,
once the hose clamps are removed. Is there a trick to pulling tubing off of
barb fittings?
thanks
Sanjay

_____

From: Q-LIST@... [mailto:Q-LIST@...] On Behalf Of
Paul S
Sent: Monday, July 04, 2011 9:00 AM
To: Q-LIST@...
Subject: [Q-LIST] First flight

It was 14 years ago today that I made my first flight, I am headed out to
make a flight to celebrate that event.

Thnx for the posts about your flights Sanjay, it has reminded me of my
experience back then. Have you changed you fuel filter yet? The tanks are
never as clean as we think they are. Guess why I've brought this up. I
suggest changing the filters every five hours until you find nothing in them
when you pull them apart.

Happy Birthday USA and congratulations Sanjay.

Paul


Re: N1711Q Update

quickheads
 

Hey Rick,
Q-tube is working fine again. It's located here:

http://www.quickheads.com/q-tube/frontpage.html

You need to be logged-in to the website in order to upload videos directly to the site. Let me know if you have problems. In the meantime, I'll check out the VIMEO version. Nice work!

Cheers,
Dan Yager
QBA Editor
www.quickheads.com

We have a nice video of the event to post. I remember the video
upload was
in limbo for a while and I do not see it on the website now. When
downloads
are possible I will post it. Meanwhile when video rendering
completes I
will post it on Vimeo and you can look at it there.

Rick Hole

N1711Q going flying in just a few more days


N1711Q Update

Rick Hole
 

Here is the video of today's engine test run, with commentary:



<http://vimeo.com/26038774> http://vimeo.com/26038774



Rick Hole

N1711Q Engine running


Re: N1711Q Update

Bruce Crain
 

Rick,Starting the engine must have been pretty exciting!! Glad to hear all of the problems are being worked out!Fun to hear of your progress!Bruce Crain

---------- Original Message ----------
From: "Rick Hole" <r.hole@...>
To: <Q-LIST@...>
Subject: [Q-LIST] N1711Q Update
Date: Tue, 5 Jul 2011 20:44:09 -0400


The fuel sensors turned out to be resistor-simulator types and once I
figured that out it was easy to get them to send a signal to the dual-meter
gauge and to the GRT engine monitor.

The two fuel leaks are fixed and when we "could not figure out anything else
to do" we decided to attempt engine start.

The O200 has been stored for five years so you just don't know if it will
give trouble. We had some difficulty getting the oil pump primed the other
day.

So with the support crew in place and Scott Swing at the controls, we made
the attempt. To our delight the engine fired on the first blade but ran
only briefly before stopping of fuel starvation. Check that fuel cut-off
valve. Yep, it is on. Maybe we should try "off". Next start was
successful. And we put that valve actuator on the task list for rework.

The engine parameters looked good. Tach read correctly. Oil pressure OK.
All four cylinders showing performance on CHT and EGT. Fuel flow indication
inop. Mag check showed right mag connection to be hot (added to task list)
and no tach indication when right mag is selected. The engine ran smoothly.

We had several starts this afternoon and are very pleased.

After checking continuity of the mag key-switch, we concluded that the right
mag P-lead must be open. Alas, it was necessary to pull the engine off the
mount to check. And indeed the wire was open. Odd, it tested ok before
assembly. At this point I do not worry about that, just remove the old wire
and pull a new one. I do not want to deal with something intermittent later
on.

We have a nice video of the event to post. I remember the video upload was
in limbo for a while and I do not see it on the website now. When downloads
are possible I will post it. Meanwhile when video rendering completes I
will post it on Vimeo and you can look at it there.

Rick Hole

N1711Q going flying in just a few more days





____________________________________________________________
57 Year Old Mom Looks 27!
Mom Reveals $5 Wrinkle Trick That Has Angered Doctors!
http://thirdpartyoffers.juno.com/TGL3131/4e13b5b1a23ab226401st04vuc


N1711Q Update

Rick Hole
 

The fuel sensors turned out to be resistor-simulator types and once I
figured that out it was easy to get them to send a signal to the dual-meter
gauge and to the GRT engine monitor.



The two fuel leaks are fixed and when we "could not figure out anything else
to do" we decided to attempt engine start.



The O200 has been stored for five years so you just don't know if it will
give trouble. We had some difficulty getting the oil pump primed the other
day.



So with the support crew in place and Scott Swing at the controls, we made
the attempt. To our delight the engine fired on the first blade but ran
only briefly before stopping of fuel starvation. Check that fuel cut-off
valve. Yep, it is on. Maybe we should try "off". Next start was
successful. And we put that valve actuator on the task list for rework.



The engine parameters looked good. Tach read correctly. Oil pressure OK.
All four cylinders showing performance on CHT and EGT. Fuel flow indication
inop. Mag check showed right mag connection to be hot (added to task list)
and no tach indication when right mag is selected. The engine ran smoothly.



We had several starts this afternoon and are very pleased.



After checking continuity of the mag key-switch, we concluded that the right
mag P-lead must be open. Alas, it was necessary to pull the engine off the
mount to check. And indeed the wire was open. Odd, it tested ok before
assembly. At this point I do not worry about that, just remove the old wire
and pull a new one. I do not want to deal with something intermittent later
on.



We have a nice video of the event to post. I remember the video upload was
in limbo for a while and I do not see it on the website now. When downloads
are possible I will post it. Meanwhile when video rendering completes I
will post it on Vimeo and you can look at it there.



Rick Hole

N1711Q going flying in just a few more days


Re: First flight

dkeats <dkeats@...>
 

Sanjay----- On my airplanes I use automotive rubber fuel lines. They don't
harden and last forever.

On another note regarding header tanks. On the Dragonfly we leave the fuel
pump on all the time and then the header overflows and feeds back to the
main. When I turn on my master, my pump is also on. No separate switch to
forget. You may have to put a small restrictor in the line if the pump is
pumping faster than the gravity return, but this system has worked great for
me for twenty years.

Canada Chris


First flight

Rick Hole
 

Since you will service the fuel filter regularly, I would consider changing
the fittings so you have a flare fitting on each end of the filter. It
won't take many servicings before you will say "I'm glad I did that"!



Barb fittings are OK with rubber fuel tubing, but urethane gets hard and not
really reusable in a short time. It remains strong, but stiffens.



Rick Hole

N1711Q Engine is running!


Re: Jim Patillo fuel system

scheevel@...
 

Many Thanks, Jim,

Sam Kittle also sent me some pics of his tank offline, which apparently was modelled after yours, so am able to visualize your description. Thanks also for the extra comments about grounding and materials. Hope to see you and your plane (and everyone elses) in August at LVK.

Cheers,
Jay Scheevel -- Tri-Q, still building

--- In Q-LIST@..., "Jim P" <logistics_engineering@...> wrote:

Hi Jay,

My fuels system is a one off. So here goes.

The header tank does not go fully across the fuselage like plans built tanks. It was made to fit to the right side of the radio stack centered in panel)and gos to within 2" of the firewall. It is about 9" tall and holds 5.5 gals. (I did this to offset the fuel weight to the right when flying single). It's accessed from the top as you saw in the picture but the picture is a little misleading. The fuel cap opening on the top of the fuselage is directly in front of the passenger.

All my fuel supply lines from pump to the header, through the shut off valve to carb are 3/8" stainless steel w/fittings. I do not like plastic. I have no site gauge but instead have two fuel guages and a low level fuel and light alarm.

The main fill tube is 2 1/2" dia. steel and runs through and exits the header to the right side of passenger leg at the bottom of the tank. The connection from header tube to main tank tube is 2 1/2" Goodyear Aircraft gas line. The fuel fill tube is recessed about 3/4" below the bottom of the upper fuselage with some small 3/8" holes around the perimeter. This allows me to quickly fill directly into the main tank or the header. The steel tube is grounded to the ground buss.

I have no gascolator!

The fuel cap assembly is aluminum (grounded as well). I've never had any fuel leaks anywhere but did replace the fuel cap gasket once because of an air leak (created lower head pressure than needed).

Hope this helps.

Regards,

Jim Patillo N46JP Q200




--- In Q-LIST@..., scheevel@ wrote:

Hi Jim,

It has been a few years since I saw your plane. I was looking at the video of your walk around on the Q-tube and I noticed that you have a flush mount filler cap near the center of the header on top and in front of the glass. I am planning out my fuel tank plumbing now and am considering doing something like this. Can you tell me how that filler fits (where/how deep) into the header? Also, if you only fill from the header, how does it feed into the main? Thanks for your help. I am sure you have been asked this before, but I could not find it in the archives.

Cheers,
Jay Scheevel -- Tri-Q still building


Re: Jim Patillo fuel system

Jim Patillo
 

Hi Jay,

My fuels system is a one off. So here goes.

The header tank does not go fully across the fuselage like plans built tanks. It was made to fit to the right side of the radio stack centered in panel)and gos to within 2" of the firewall. It is about 9" tall and holds 5.5 gals. (I did this to offset the fuel weight to the right when flying single). It's accessed from the top as you saw in the picture but the picture is a little misleading. The fuel cap opening on the top of the fuselage is directly in front of the passenger.

All my fuel supply lines from pump to the header, through the shut off valve to carb are 3/8" stainless steel w/fittings. I do not like plastic. I have no site gauge but instead have two fuel guages and a low level fuel and light alarm.

The main fill tube is 2 1/2" dia. steel and runs through and exits the header to the right side of passenger leg at the bottom of the tank. The connection from header tube to main tank tube is 2 1/2" Goodyear Aircraft gas line. The fuel fill tube is recessed about 3/4" below the bottom of the upper fuselage with some small 3/8" holes around the perimeter. This allows me to quickly fill directly into the main tank or the header. The steel tube is grounded to the ground buss.

I have no gascolator!

The fuel cap assembly is aluminum (grounded as well). I've never had any fuel leaks anywhere but did replace the fuel cap gasket once because of an air leak (created lower head pressure than needed).

Hope this helps.

Regards,

Jim Patillo N46JP Q200

--- In Q-LIST@..., scheevel@... wrote:

Hi Jim,

It has been a few years since I saw your plane. I was looking at the video of your walk around on the Q-tube and I noticed that you have a flush mount filler cap near the center of the header on top and in front of the glass. I am planning out my fuel tank plumbing now and am considering doing something like this. Can you tell me how that filler fits (where/how deep) into the header? Also, if you only fill from the header, how does it feed into the main? Thanks for your help. I am sure you have been asked this before, but I could not find it in the archives.

Cheers,
Jay Scheevel -- Tri-Q still building


Re: Jim Patillo fuel system

Chris Rayner <chris-rayner@...>
 

Hi Jay, sounds like you're doing the right things. Good luck.

Chris



From: Q-LIST@... [mailto:Q-LIST@...] On Behalf Of
scheevel@...
Sent: 05 July 2011 16:38
To: Q-LIST@...
Subject: [Q-LIST] Re: Jim Patillo fuel system





Thanks Chris. I appreciate your insight and can imagine what was running
through your head when the fuel was pouring over your panel!. I am doing a
couple of things that should prevent anything like that occuring. 1. I am
building the tanks separately and pressure testing before they go into the
airplane, and 2. my canopy opening is a set of gull wing doors, with the
forward 1/3 of the original Q-2 canopy permanently fixed and glassed to the
fuselage in front of the door openings, kind of like a more curvey version
of a Globe Swift cockpit entry. Any leakage would have no chance of coming
under the forward edge of the canopy because it is integral to the airframe.
Also I long ago made the choice NOT to use any of the more questionable
materials (like PVC and the plastic screw-on cap assembly) so I will stick
with tubing materials, caps, fittings, and practices that are designed to
aircraft standards.

Cheers,
Jay Scheevel -- Tri-Q, still building

--- In Q-LIST@... <mailto:Q-LIST%40yahoogroups.com> , "Chris
Rayner" <chris-rayner@...> wrote:

Hi Jay, I know you addressed the question to Jim and I'm sure his fuel
system works fine, but I also had a filler in the header tank and it
didn't
work fine. When I bought my part-built kit, the filler was there and even
though it's not "per plans", I thought it looked a good idea. It wasn't
flush though, and it used the white plumbing pipe that is suggested in the
plans. This (and all other white plumbing pipe in my plane went soft, so I
replaced it all and fitted a nice looking flush header tank filler. On one
of the early check flights, fuel started to pour into the cockpit under
the
canopy! This was because the fuel pump was running and the header filled
up,
and was recirculating - which is fine. But the seal on the cap was not
good
enough to hold the fuel in. I don't have the top filler cap now; I glassed
it up instead of trying to fix the seal. OK it's not so easy to fill the
header tank, but it's lighter and it can't leak. My two pence (UK).

Cheers

Chris Rayner (G-CUIK)



From: Q-LIST@... <mailto:Q-LIST%40yahoogroups.com>
[mailto:Q-LIST@... <mailto:Q-LIST%40yahoogroups.com> ] On Behalf
Of
scheevel@...
Sent: 05 July 2011 05:10
To: Q-LIST@... <mailto:Q-LIST%40yahoogroups.com>
Subject: [Q-LIST] Jim Patillo fuel system





Hi Jim,

It has been a few years since I saw your plane. I was looking at the video
of your walk around on the Q-tube and I noticed that you have a flush
mount
filler cap near the center of the header on top and in front of the glass.
I
am planning out my fuel tank plumbing now and am considering doing
something
like this. Can you tell me how that filler fits (where/how deep) into the
header? Also, if you only fill from the header, how does it feed into the
main? Thanks for your help. I am sure you have been asked this before, but
I
could not find it in the archives.

Cheers,
Jay Scheevel -- Tri-Q still building






17361 - 17380 of 55461