Date   

Reflexer

Paul Spackman
 

I am just wondering about the reflexer setting that TriQ fliers are using for take-off. With the recent discussion of take-off speeds and the pressure exerted on the nose wheel before lift-off is anyone setting the reflexer to reduce the pressure on the nose wheel? Just curious.

While on the subject of reflexer I spent some time thinking about the word reflexer. Reflex is a Latin derived word and with these words the agentive suffix "or" is usually added so with that in mind maybe it should be reflexor. I have seen it both ways on this list and have spelled it both ways myself. But wait a minute, in America we tend to add the suffix "er" whether it is Latin based or not and in the UK they tend to add "or" Latin based or not. So I guess that we have words like advisor and adviser used at different colleges and schools throughout the US. I know I have strange thoughts when I wake-up in the middle of the night but I was just wonder if you will be using your reflexer or your reflexor on your next take-off and landing.


Re: Guess what I'm holding in my hand.

hargin
 

Congrates Jerry!! It is a great day.  Save some beer for all of us.
Mitch Hargin

--- On Fri, 7/8/11, brinkerhuf@... <brinkerhuf@...> wrote:

From: brinkerhuf@... <brinkerhuf@...>
Subject: [Q-LIST] Guess what I'm holding in my hand.
To: Q-LIST@...
Date: Friday, July 8, 2011, 5:10 PM
















 









It could be a cold premium Grain Belt beer but it's not. No, it's my brand new pink airworthiness certificate complements of the FAA. After 2 long months of waiting I'm approved. Now it's off to the airport. Let the fun begin. Jerry Brinkerhuff Q-200 Airworthy and ready to taxi/fly.



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Reflexer

One Sky Dog
 

My $.02,

In a tri gear the canard has to develop enough lift to lift the nose before
the rear wing lifts or you will wheelbarrow like Sanjay. Fixing it
involves dumping lift from the rear wing by - flaps on the rear wing. You ban also
increase the incidence angle of the canard to the ground to get more lift
from the canard in the ground roll before the rear wing kicks in with
ailerons in trail.

As for spellings neither are recognized but the root word reflex as
pertaining to airfoils a starting point is.

_http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Camber_(aerodynamics_
(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Camber_(aerodynamics) )

If you are wheelbarrowing or jumping off the runway after a long high speed
ground roll, you may want to look at angles of successful planes Bruce
Crain's comes to mind as well as others.

Off the box,

One Sky Dog

In a message dated 7/10/2011 8:27:16 P.M. Mountain Daylight Time,
wypaul2001@... writes:

I am just wondering about the reflexer setting that TriQ fliers are using
for take-off. With the recent discussion of take-off speeds and the
pressure exerted on the nose wheel before lift-off is anyone setting the reflexer
to reduce the pressure on the nose wheel? Just curious.

While on the subject of reflexer I spent some time thinking about the word
reflexer. Reflex is a Latin derived word and with these words the
agentive suffix "or" is usually added so with that in mind maybe it should be
reflexor. I have seen it both ways on this list and have spelled it both ways
myself. But wait a minute, in America we tend to add the suffix "er" w
hether it is Latin based or not and in the UK they tend to add "or" Latin
based or not. So I guess that we have words like advisor and adviser used at
different colleges and schools throughout the US. I know I have strange
thoughts when I wake-up in the middle of the night but I was just wonder if
you will be using your reflexer or your reflexor on your next take-off and
landing.



------------------------------------

Quickie Builders Association WEB site
http://www.quickiebuilders.org

Yahoo! Groups Links


Morning Flight

Bruce Crain
 

I gave a ride to one of my UPS driver mates this morning from Enid to Wiley Post in OKC. We took off about 8:16 a.m. and climbed to 3500' msl. The temp was 93 at that altitude so it was a bit uncomfortable. I have plenty of cockpit air as I put exit openings under both main wings where as before I had under the fuz openings (min rollers).

The oil temp stayed at about 180 degrees F. I have an oil cooler with a NACA duct in and vent plenum out to separate the nose inlets from the oil cooling. I also have a plenum across the bottom of the block. The flight lasted about 30 mins both ways. I probably have slowed myself down with so much cooling but then in Oklahoma and the hot south that is not such a bad deal.

I also have plenums into the cylinder/head area. I do have to nose over a bit in climb out to keep the CHT below 400 degrees F. If I leave the mixture rich the temps don't go up nearly as fast but then I don't get quite as much climb rich at higher altitudes.

My friend Byron loved the flight even if it was hot. He said this was one of the best days he had ever experienced. The temp coming home at 4500' msl was 95. The oil temps were virtually the same 180 degrees.

The day eventually climbed to 114 degrees but we had left the airport area. I went home to mow the lawn! Try that in 114 degrees!! Followed by a dip in the pool! And of course a short nap. ;o)

I may be slow but I am one of the coolest Quickies goin'! And if I can keep her cool I get to keep her longer.

Bruce Crain
N96BJ

P.S. Primed and ready for Oshkosh!

____________________________________________________________
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Sign up to the #1 voted penny stock newsletter for free today!
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Re: Guess what I'm holding in my hand.

schmayhoo
 

Thank you all for your well wishes. Sanjay, I'm flying a 25 mile radius around 35D Allegan Michigan's Padgham field. My plan is to do the taxi tests and first few flights at nearby Tulip City airport which has a nice wide 6000 ft runway that's well kept and then move back to 4200 ft Allegan. Mike, how long you have to wait for FSDO depends on how "busy" your local chapter of the FAA happens to be. In my case, they were extremely "busy" and kept suggesting that I get a DAR. I believe that Sanjay only had to wait a few days for his "non-busy" FAA friends to view his project. After the dust settles, I plan on writing a little account of my experience for the newsletter to give some knowledge of the mysterious process to those who follow. I've learned a lot and it's useful to share it. But for now, I've got to line up a trailer, get a hangar and make the move. Stay tuned for updates. Jerry Brinkerhuff Q-200 Licenced N2935R Airworthy and ready to rock.

-----Original Message-----
From: Sanjay Dhall <sdhall@...>
To: Q-LIST <Q-LIST@...>
Sent: Sat, Jul 9, 2011 4:11 am
Subject: RE: [Q-LIST] Guess what I'm holding in my hand.





Yippeee! And just a 100miles from Willow Run. What test area did they
designate?
Congrats!
Sanjay

_____

From: Q-LIST@... [mailto:Q-LIST@...] On Behalf Of
brinkerhuf@...
Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 6:11 PM
To: Q-LIST@...
Subject: [Q-LIST] Guess what I'm holding in my hand.

It could be a cold premium Grain Belt beer but it's not. No, it's my brand
new pink airworthiness certificate complements of the FAA. After 2 long
months of waiting I'm approved. Now it's off to the airport. Let the fun
begin. Jerry Brinkerhuff Q-200 Airworthy and ready to taxi/fly.



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]









[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Guess what I'm holding in my hand.

Sam Hoskins
 

When Mike Thompson, the head of the Sport Air Racing League, completed his
RV the examiner asked what he would like for his test area. He asked for,
and received, "Texas".

Sam



On Sat, Jul 9, 2011 at 7:10 AM, Sanjay Dhall <sdhall@...> wrote:

**


Yippeee! And just a 100miles from Willow Run. What test area did they
designate?
Congrats!
Sanjay


_____

From: Q-LIST@... [mailto:Q-LIST@...] On Behalf Of
brinkerhuf@...
Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 6:11 PM

To: Q-LIST@...
Subject: [Q-LIST] Guess what I'm holding in my hand.

It could be a cold premium Grain Belt beer but it's not. No, it's my brand
new pink airworthiness certificate complements of the FAA. After 2 long
months of waiting I'm approved. Now it's off to the airport. Let the fun
begin. Jerry Brinkerhuff Q-200 Airworthy and ready to taxi/fly.



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Guess what I'm holding in my hand.

Sanjay Dhall <sdhall@...>
 

Yippeee! And just a 100miles from Willow Run. What test area did they
designate?
Congrats!
Sanjay

_____

From: Q-LIST@... [mailto:Q-LIST@...] On Behalf Of
brinkerhuf@...
Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 6:11 PM
To: Q-LIST@...
Subject: [Q-LIST] Guess what I'm holding in my hand.




It could be a cold premium Grain Belt beer but it's not. No, it's my brand
new pink airworthiness certificate complements of the FAA. After 2 long
months of waiting I'm approved. Now it's off to the airport. Let the fun
begin. Jerry Brinkerhuff Q-200 Airworthy and ready to taxi/fly.


Re: Guess what I'm holding in my hand.

Kevin Boddicker
 

I think you deserve a cold QUART of Premium Grain Belt beer!!!
Too bad they sold their allotment for the year while you were here!!!!
Congrats! Proceed with safety!

Kevin Boddicker
TriQ 200 N7868B 209 hrs
Luana, IA.



On Jul 8, 2011, at 5:10 PM, brinkerhuf@... wrote:

It could be a cold premium Grain Belt beer but it's not. No, it's my brand new pink airworthiness certificate complements of the FAA. After 2 long months of waiting I'm approved. Now it's off to the airport. Let the fun begin. Jerry Brinkerhuff Q-200 Airworthy and ready to taxi/fly.

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Guess what I'm holding in my hand.

quickheads
 

Awesome Jerry! Keep us posted on your progress. It really is great to see so much activity this year!

Congrats,
Dan Yager
QBA Editor
www.quickheads.com

On Fri, 8 Jul 2011 18:10:53 -0400 (EDT), brinkerhuf@... wrote:
It could be a cold premium Grain Belt beer but it's not. No, it's my
brand new pink airworthiness certificate complements of the FAA. After
2 long months of waiting I'm approved. Now it's off to the airport.
Let the fun begin. Jerry Brinkerhuff Q-200 Airworthy and ready to
taxi/fly.


Re: Guess what I'm holding in my hand.

Joseph M Snow <1flashq@...>
 

Congrtulations Jerry!  It's a huge milestone.  Now to the transition from builder to homebuilt pilot.
 
Joseph

--- On Fri, 7/8/11, brinkerhuf@... <brinkerhuf@...> wrote:


From: brinkerhuf@... <brinkerhuf@...>
Subject: [Q-LIST] Guess what I'm holding in my hand.
To: Q-LIST@...
Date: Friday, July 8, 2011, 6:10 PM


 



It could be a cold premium Grain Belt beer but it's not. No, it's my brand new pink airworthiness certificate complements of the FAA. After 2 long months of waiting I'm approved. Now it's off to the airport. Let the fun begin. Jerry Brinkerhuff Q-200 Airworthy and ready to taxi/fly.

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]








[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Guess what I'm holding in my hand.

Bruce Crain
 

Atta' boy Jerry!You da man studdly!Bruce

---------- Original Message ----------
From: brinkerhuf@...
To: Q-LIST@...
Subject: [Q-LIST] Guess what I'm holding in my hand.
Date: Fri, 8 Jul 2011 18:10:53 -0400 (EDT)


It could be a cold premium Grain Belt beer but it's not. No, it's my brand new pink airworthiness certificate complements of the FAA. After 2 long months of waiting I'm approved. Now it's off to the airport. Let the fun begin. Jerry Brinkerhuff Q-200 Airworthy and ready to taxi/fly.





____________________________________________________________
57 Year Old Mom Looks 27!
Mom Reveals $5 Wrinkle Trick That Has Angered Doctors!
http://thirdpartyoffers.juno.com/TGL3131/4e179b0e4cf332ae7abst01vuc


Re: Guess what I'm holding in my hand.

Mike Evans
 

WOW! I'm getting so excited with all this great activity. I still have at
least another year before I can send out such and email. I just have to
hang an engine on my Tri-Q200 and tow it to an airport. haha, not much!

Keep us informed, hey, is it normal to have to wait 2 months?

--
Mike Evans, Tri-Q200, still building in LA


Re: Guess what I'm holding in my hand.

Sam Hoskins
 

All right Jerry!!!

On Fri, Jul 8, 2011 at 5:10 PM, <brinkerhuf@...> wrote:

**


It could be a cold premium Grain Belt beer but it's not. No, it's my brand
new pink airworthiness certificate complements of the FAA. After 2 long
months of waiting I'm approved. Now it's off to the airport. Let the fun
begin. Jerry Brinkerhuff Q-200 Airworthy and ready to taxi/fly.





Re: Guess what I'm holding in my hand.

John Loram <johnl@...>
 

Color me green!!!

best! -john-


_____

From: Q-LIST@... [mailto:Q-LIST@...] On Behalf Of
brinkerhuf@...
Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 3:11 PM
To: Q-LIST@...
Subject: [Q-LIST] Guess what I'm holding in my hand.




It could be a cold premium Grain Belt beer but it's not. No, it's my brand
new pink airworthiness certificate complements of the FAA. After 2 long
months of waiting I'm approved. Now it's off to the airport. Let the fun
begin. Jerry Brinkerhuff Q-200 Airworthy and ready to taxi/fly.


Guess what I'm holding in my hand.

schmayhoo
 

It could be a cold premium Grain Belt beer but it's not. No, it's my brand new pink airworthiness certificate complements of the FAA. After 2 long months of waiting I'm approved. Now it's off to the airport. Let the fun begin. Jerry Brinkerhuff Q-200 Airworthy and ready to taxi/fly.


Re: Flights #6 & #7 - rising oil temps

Sanjay Dhall <sdhall@...>
 

A few more details about the engine. Its an O-200, with standard
compression, reportedly with 60 hours since rebuilt from parts (case and
other parts re-machined) and new Millenium pistons and cylinders. Thats when
I bought it. Then I put in about 11.5 hours in ground running and taxiing.
And 5.5 hours of flying and ground ops. Compressions are 79-80 on all 4
cylinders when I checked at 67hr mark. Now a total of 77 hrs (assuming the
original 60 hrs at purchase).
The oil I am losing is not from oil burn, but draining down the intake tubes
and coming out the carb bypass hole (standard cessna airbox). Oil collects
in a puddle only after shutdown, and about 3 tablespoons. This is a nuisance
item, but not the main source of my concern at the moment, which is rising
oil temps. The breather vent tube shows only a drop or two on shutdown.
Plenums are pretty tight and snug and were built on and wrap around the
cylinders all the way to the within 1/2 inch of the pushrod tubes.
I have only 1 CHT and 1 EGT probe and these are attached to the right rear
cyl #1. (Since this cylinder is the farthest away and would presumably have
the worst cooling. CHT temps are below 400F. I am not leaning the mixture.
thanks
Sanjay

_____

From: Q-LIST@... [mailto:Q-LIST@...] On Behalf Of
L.J. French
Sent: Thursday, July 07, 2011 11:14 PM
To: Q-LIST@...
Subject: RE: [Q-LIST] Flights #6 & #7 - rising oil temps




Sanjay,
Don't worry about #1. You don't see that on factory plenum systems and logic
says there is very little heat transfer that occurs in that small area (no
fins, no efficient way to wick heat away).
Also, I have experimented with #3, but did not get any appreciable
improvements with sump and filter cooling.

Remind me of a couple things: Is your engine fresh i.e. cylinders, pistons?
What type of cylinders i.e. chrome or steel? Do you have a lot of oil
residue coming from your crankcase vent tube?

Without seeing your installation in detail, my mind would wander to things
like the inter cylinder baffles, the head baffles, the wraparound of the
plenums on the front and back, and the tightness of the plenums.

I have worked a lot on an engine that can take me anywhere without worry of
oil temps. Last weekend I flew into Olney, Tx. running about 210 degree oil
temps coming into the airport. The temperature on the ground was 111 deg. F.
After we fueled up and got back up to altitude my oil temps were 230 deg.
Not bad considering. I optimized several different things to get good
cooling, but in the end, I added an oil cooler but it is only fed by a 1"
piece of scat tubing. Another thing I do that helps is to run rich mixtures
until I can get up to altitude. I assume you are running full rich.

Regards,
LJ French

-----Original Message-----
From: Q-LIST@... <mailto:Q-LIST%40yahoogroups.com>
[mailto:Q-LIST@... <mailto:Q-LIST%40yahoogroups.com> ] On Behalf
Of
Sanjay Dhall
Sent: Thursday, July 07, 2011 9:38 PM
To: Q-LIST@... <mailto:Q-LIST%40yahoogroups.com>
Subject: [Q-LIST] Flights #6 & #7 - rising oil temps

During the last 2 flights I logged a total of 1.5 hours, 5.5 hrs cumulative.
Flew on July 4 in the a.m., and today July 7 at 7pm. Outside temps have been
around 80F. Winds have been 5-7 from east. Takeoffs from 23L (saves taxiing
for several miles to get to the other side of the airport.) Circled the
airport a lot, then wandered away for brief excursions. But still don't feel
comfortable leaving runways behind!
During these 2 flights I have been experimenting with the effect of reflexor
during takeoff and during flight. I have noted that during takeoff using
several notches of up reflexor minimizes the nose tuck that I have
experienced on earlier flights and makes for a more comfortable takeoff.
During these 2 flights I have been running the engine at lower rpms in the
range of 2000-2300 for a good part of level flying. Speeds are not
spectacular.
I had recently added a screen in front of the pitot tube to keep bugs outs -
I notice that the presence of the screen led to 10-15mph drop in indicated
airspeed reading and some oscillation of the gage. I guess the presence of
the screen material is inducing some turbulence in the pitot. Now these
readings are lower than GPS speed readings. Still calibrating.
But on both these flights, I have been noticing oil temps rising noticeably
and continuing to climb. On both occassions when I noted the oil temp move
past 215F, I cut short any further flying and have come in to land.
These oil temps are beginning to bother me. I have come up with 4 possible
causes:
1) My plenum does not cover the crankcase, only the cylinderheads. So maybe
the case may not be staying sufficiently cool?
2) I still have oil gather in cowl after engine shutdown, coming from carb
airbox - leading to a continued reduction of oil. Started with 5.5 quarts
2-3 weeks ago. Now down to 5.1 - 5.2 quarts. Reduced quantity of oil would
mean that to scavenge the same amount of engine heat would require the oil
to heat up more than before?
3) The airflow in my cowl around oil sump and oil filter may be a problem?
4) Something could be going on in the engine leading to higher oil temp? But
the CHT does not show excessive temp.
I have considered changing the oil, and topping it. Another thought is to
make cooling fins by folding some thin aluminum, then putting slits in it to
allow wrapping around the oil sump and attaching with safety wire.
Any ideas as to the cause of the higher oil temps, and remedies?
thanks
Sanjay










------------------------------------

Quickie Builders Association WEB site
http://www.quickiebuilders.org

Yahoo! Groups Links


Re: Flights #6 & #7 - rising oil temps

Sam Hoskins
 

Sanjay, here is a bit I posted about oil temps a while back:
http://samhoskins.blogspot.com/2009/09/why-do-you-think-they-call-it-quickie.html
The red line oil temp is 240 degrees, that is where the oil starts losing
the ability to lubricate. It's official, take it to the bank., so don't
really be too concerned about the oil temps right now, unless you see it
creeping over 230 or so.

As you know, I am a firm believer in having the plenum covering the
crankcase for increased cooling.

Do you have an air/oil separator installed? Lack of one could be causing
your oil in the cowling, depending where the crankcase vents. I just got an
Oil Miser and it seems to work really well.
http://samhoskins.blogspot.com/2011/06/cozy-girrrls-oil-miser.html

Give me a call if you like.

Sam








On Thu, Jul 7, 2011 at 9:38 PM, Sanjay Dhall <sdhall@...> wrote:

**


During the last 2 flights I logged a total of 1.5 hours, 5.5 hrs
cumulative.
Flew on July 4 in the a.m., and today July 7 at 7pm. Outside temps have
been
around 80F. Winds have been 5-7 from east. Takeoffs from 23L (saves taxiing
for several miles to get to the other side of the airport.)
Circled the airport a lot, then wandered away for brief excursions. But
still don't feel comfortable leaving runways behind!
During these 2 flights I have been experimenting with the effect of
reflexor
during takeoff and during flight. I have noted that during takeoff using
several notches of up reflexor minimizes the nose tuck that I have
experienced on earlier flights and makes for a more comfortable takeoff.
During these 2 flights I have been running the engine at lower rpms in the
range of 2000-2300 for a good part of level flying. Speeds are not
spectacular.
I had recently added a screen in front of the pitot tube to keep bugs outs
-
I notice that the presence of the screen led to 10-15mph drop in indicated
airspeed reading and some oscillation of the gage. I guess the presence of
the screen material is inducing some turbulence in the pitot. Now these
readings are lower than GPS speed readings. Still calibrating.
But on both these flights, I have been noticing oil temps rising noticeably
and continuing to climb. On both occassions when I noted the oil temp move
past 215F, I cut short any further flying and have come in to land.
These oil temps are beginning to bother me. I have come up with 4 possible
causes:
1) My plenum does not cover the crankcase, only the cylinderheads. So maybe
the case may not be staying sufficiently cool?
2) I still have oil gather in cowl after engine shutdown, coming from carb
airbox - leading to a continued reduction of oil. Started with 5.5 quarts
2-3 weeks ago. Now down to 5.1 - 5.2 quarts. Reduced quantity of oil would
mean that to scavenge the same amount of engine heat would require the oil
to heat up more than before?
3) The airflow in my cowl around oil sump and oil filter may be a problem?
4) Something could be going on in the engine leading to higher oil temp?
But
the CHT does not show excessive temp.
I have considered changing the oil, and topping it. Another thought is to
make cooling fins by folding some thin aluminum, then putting slits in it
to
allow wrapping around the oil sump and attaching with safety wire.
Any ideas as to the cause of the higher oil temps, and remedies?
thanks
Sanjay












[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: fitting the cowl

Jon Swenson
 

Thanks for all the suggestions. These ideas give me the basis I needed to proceed. I had envisioned similar techniques but I think your input will help me avoid some of the mistakes.

Jon

99% there 75-80% to go.

--- In Q-LIST@..., Joseph M Snow <1flashq@...> wrote:

Jon,
 
I do not have any photos of my process to acquire "straight" lines at the cowl/fusalage junction.  I created a straight edge on the cowl; then, wrapped the cowl edges with duct tape as a release.  The cowl was installed onto the airframe.  A matching straight edge was created by packing flox into the gap between the cowl and fuselage.  When cured, the resulting edge is the width of the duct tape and matches the cowl edge.  Here is a link to my cowl photos enclosing the corvair engine:  http://www.corvairq.info/Cowl.htm
 
Joseph Snow
N240JS, Q2xx 

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Flights #6 & #7 - rising oil temps

Chris Rayner <chris-rayner@...>
 

Hi Sanjay, it's great following your progress and in plenty of ways mirrors
what I've been doing with my Q-200. A word on oil temps with the O-200.
There has been discussion on the list several times about oil temps and cyl
head temps etc. I was very concerned about oil temps on my newly re-built
C-90/O-200 hybrid. I saw temps up to 230F when the engine was only a few
hours old, using straight oil. Also it was very tight after shut down. I
remember other guys have had similar as well. However, apparently the O-200
is OK to run at up to 240F without affecting the TBO - I can't remember
where this came from, but it was authoritative and on the list some time
ago. I felt better after that, and now after only 40 hours or so, oil temps
are not more than about 210F, which I am happy with although we don't see
OAT above 80F very often. It's still tight after shut down, which is an
issue for me as it's hand swing start. I always park into wind with the
throttle open - it helps.

Good luck with your learning and please keep up the e-mails.

Cheers

Chris Rayner (G-CUIK)



From: Q-LIST@... [mailto:Q-LIST@...] On Behalf Of
Sanjay Dhall
Sent: 08 July 2011 03:38
To: Q-LIST@...
Subject: [Q-LIST] Flights #6 & #7 - rising oil temps





During the last 2 flights I logged a total of 1.5 hours, 5.5 hrs cumulative.
Flew on July 4 in the a.m., and today July 7 at 7pm. Outside temps have been
around 80F. Winds have been 5-7 from east. Takeoffs from 23L (saves taxiing
for several miles to get to the other side of the airport.)
Circled the airport a lot, then wandered away for brief excursions. But
still don't feel comfortable leaving runways behind!
During these 2 flights I have been experimenting with the effect of reflexor
during takeoff and during flight. I have noted that during takeoff using
several notches of up reflexor minimizes the nose tuck that I have
experienced on earlier flights and makes for a more comfortable takeoff.
During these 2 flights I have been running the engine at lower rpms in the
range of 2000-2300 for a good part of level flying. Speeds are not
spectacular.
I had recently added a screen in front of the pitot tube to keep bugs outs -
I notice that the presence of the screen led to 10-15mph drop in indicated
airspeed reading and some oscillation of the gage. I guess the presence of
the screen material is inducing some turbulence in the pitot. Now these
readings are lower than GPS speed readings. Still calibrating.
But on both these flights, I have been noticing oil temps rising noticeably
and continuing to climb. On both occassions when I noted the oil temp move
past 215F, I cut short any further flying and have come in to land.
These oil temps are beginning to bother me. I have come up with 4 possible
causes:
1) My plenum does not cover the crankcase, only the cylinderheads. So maybe
the case may not be staying sufficiently cool?
2) I still have oil gather in cowl after engine shutdown, coming from carb
airbox - leading to a continued reduction of oil. Started with 5.5 quarts
2-3 weeks ago. Now down to 5.1 - 5.2 quarts. Reduced quantity of oil would
mean that to scavenge the same amount of engine heat would require the oil
to heat up more than before?
3) The airflow in my cowl around oil sump and oil filter may be a problem?
4) Something could be going on in the engine leading to higher oil temp? But
the CHT does not show excessive temp.
I have considered changing the oil, and topping it. Another thought is to
make cooling fins by folding some thin aluminum, then putting slits in it to
allow wrapping around the oil sump and attaching with safety wire.
Any ideas as to the cause of the higher oil temps, and remedies?
thanks
Sanjay


Re: Flights #6 & #7 - rising oil temps

Bruce Crain
 

Continued turns and climbs can send your oil temps up as the air is not going straight into your plenums. Also what is your CHT at the hottest and which cylinder? Anything over 400 CHT is reason to lower the nose and let the heat come down. It takes awhile for oil temps to come down after a long climb. You may just need to lower the nose and see if they come down after maybe 5 mins or longer if you can. Don't let the oil temps get away from you though. Watch your CHT and let that be your limit for climb outs.I don't see your oil burn .3 qts after 5 hours is anything to worry about.Bruce
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Groupon&#8482 Official Site
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