Date   

Re: UV damage

Richard <mylittlemgb@...>
 

Okay here is my 2 cents worth and many years of painting and composit work. As long as the top coat is opaque color you have UV protection and the glass will not break down. Remember all colors of paint start with white. As far as paint peal this is due to poor prep work before the paint is applied. So as long as the glass has had some king of paint on it, it is protected. The time to worry is when you see blisters in the glass from delamination. We have a fabric covered homebuilt close to me that is flown weekly painted in house latex paint and sits on the flight line tie downs. Covering is now 20+ years old and still passes the punch test. So in short if it has paint on it there is no reason to believe it to be bad.

Richard
FLAPs

--- In Q-LIST@..., Mike Dwyer <q2pilot@...> wrote:


Quickieaircraft... Please post your name and experience signature at the end of each post. It helps us to understand who you are. Thanks.

You said that paints are all the same... Maybe true, but we rely on the dark primer to block the UV, not the top coat paint. The original post said he did not have a UV block primer so the top coat paint is irrelevant.

To Pauls comment, I'd expect the top coat paint to peel off as the fiberglass resin disappears underneath the non UV paint cover.

So, UV primer then white paint to block the ir heat from the sun.

Mike Q200 N3QP 1000hr


Sent from my Windows Phone
________________________________
From: quickieaircraft
Sent: Wednesday, July 13, 2011 9:00 AM
To: Q-LIST@...
Subject: [Q-LIST] Re: UV damage

Probably, Paul, for severe damage, anyway.

My reading seems to indicate that UV protective properties of paint are very close to eachother for different paints, and that the protection really only starts to break down once the paint does.

This is a good thing: if the part wasn't UV damaged during the build and was then painted, then it's probably safe until the paint starts to flake or otherwise deteriorate.

Some UV absorbtion testing in http://www.ultralightnews.com/features/pdf/54NewsletterMarch2003.pdf



--- In Q-LIST@..., "Paul Buckley" <paulbuckley@> wrote:

If the surface is primed and painted, but with no specific UV protection, would not any UV damage beneath the paint be made obvious by the paint surface dimpling and the glass weave showing through?

Paul Buckley
Cheshire
England

TriQ-200 under construction.
90% finished, 90% still to do.....


----- Original Message -----
From: Rick Hole
To: Q-LIST@...
Sent: Wednesday, July 13, 2011 3:53 AM
Subject: [Q-LIST] UV damage



N1711Q is well into that age, built in 1982. When working on damaged areas
we sanding carefully to expose fiberglass in several areas. It looked very
good. That's a single data point, but it falls in line with similar repairs
on Velocities which are constructed with similar technique and materials.

For a plane stored in the sun the answer may be different.

I've seen awful messes for planes which were parked outside without primer,
or thinly primed, and became dumpster bait. I would not consider repairing
any surface in that condition.

Rick Hole

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




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Re: UV damage

Mike Dwyer
 

Quickieaircraft... Please post your name and experience signature at the end of each post. It helps us to understand who you are. Thanks.

You said that paints are all the same... Maybe true, but we rely on the dark primer to block the UV, not the top coat paint. The original post said he did not have a UV block primer so the top coat paint is irrelevant.

To Pauls comment, I'd expect the top coat paint to peel off as the fiberglass resin disappears underneath the non UV paint cover.

So, UV primer then white paint to block the ir heat from the sun.

Mike Q200 N3QP 1000hr


Sent from my Windows Phone
________________________________
From: quickieaircraft
Sent: Wednesday, July 13, 2011 9:00 AM
To: Q-LIST@...
Subject: [Q-LIST] Re: UV damage

Probably, Paul, for severe damage, anyway.

My reading seems to indicate that UV protective properties of paint are very close to eachother for different paints, and that the protection really only starts to break down once the paint does.

This is a good thing: if the part wasn't UV damaged during the build and was then painted, then it's probably safe until the paint starts to flake or otherwise deteriorate.

Some UV absorbtion testing in http://www.ultralightnews.com/features/pdf/54NewsletterMarch2003.pdf



--- In Q-LIST@..., "Paul Buckley" <paulbuckley@...> wrote:

If the surface is primed and painted, but with no specific UV protection, would not any UV damage beneath the paint be made obvious by the paint surface dimpling and the glass weave showing through?

Paul Buckley
Cheshire
England

TriQ-200 under construction.
90% finished, 90% still to do.....


----- Original Message -----
From: Rick Hole
To: Q-LIST@...
Sent: Wednesday, July 13, 2011 3:53 AM
Subject: [Q-LIST] UV damage



N1711Q is well into that age, built in 1982. When working on damaged areas
we sanding carefully to expose fiberglass in several areas. It looked very
good. That's a single data point, but it falls in line with similar repairs
on Velocities which are constructed with similar technique and materials.

For a plane stored in the sun the answer may be different.

I've seen awful messes for planes which were parked outside without primer,
or thinly primed, and became dumpster bait. I would not consider repairing
any surface in that condition.

Rick Hole






------------------------------------------------------------------------------

No virus found in this message.
Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
Version: 10.0.1390 / Virus Database: 1516/3760 - Release Date: 07/12/11




Re: UV damage

quickieaircraft
 

Probably, Paul, for severe damage, anyway.

My reading seems to indicate that UV protective properties of paint are very close to eachother for different paints, and that the protection really only starts to break down once the paint does.

This is a good thing: if the part wasn't UV damaged during the build and was then painted, then it's probably safe until the paint starts to flake or otherwise deteriorate.

Some UV absorbtion testing in http://www.ultralightnews.com/features/pdf/54NewsletterMarch2003.pdf

--- In Q-LIST@..., "Paul Buckley" <paulbuckley@...> wrote:

If the surface is primed and painted, but with no specific UV protection, would not any UV damage beneath the paint be made obvious by the paint surface dimpling and the glass weave showing through?

Paul Buckley
Cheshire
England

TriQ-200 under construction.
90% finished, 90% still to do.....


----- Original Message -----
From: Rick Hole
To: Q-LIST@...
Sent: Wednesday, July 13, 2011 3:53 AM
Subject: [Q-LIST] UV damage



N1711Q is well into that age, built in 1982. When working on damaged areas
we sanding carefully to expose fiberglass in several areas. It looked very
good. That's a single data point, but it falls in line with similar repairs
on Velocities which are constructed with similar technique and materials.

For a plane stored in the sun the answer may be different.

I've seen awful messes for planes which were parked outside without primer,
or thinly primed, and became dumpster bait. I would not consider repairing
any surface in that condition.

Rick Hole

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




------------------------------------------------------------------------------

No virus found in this message.
Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
Version: 10.0.1390 / Virus Database: 1516/3760 - Release Date: 07/12/11


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: UV damage

Paul Buckley
 

If the surface is primed and painted, but with no specific UV protection, would not any UV damage beneath the paint be made obvious by the paint surface dimpling and the glass weave showing through?

Paul Buckley
Cheshire
England

TriQ-200 under construction.
90% finished, 90% still to do.....

----- Original Message -----
From: Rick Hole
To: Q-LIST@...
Sent: Wednesday, July 13, 2011 3:53 AM
Subject: [Q-LIST] UV damage



N1711Q is well into that age, built in 1982. When working on damaged areas
we sanding carefully to expose fiberglass in several areas. It looked very
good. That's a single data point, but it falls in line with similar repairs
on Velocities which are constructed with similar technique and materials.

For a plane stored in the sun the answer may be different.

I've seen awful messes for planes which were parked outside without primer,
or thinly primed, and became dumpster bait. I would not consider repairing
any surface in that condition.

Rick Hole






------------------------------------------------------------------------------

No virus found in this message.
Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
Version: 10.0.1390 / Virus Database: 1516/3760 - Release Date: 07/12/11


Re: Q2 Brake Rotors. . .

quickheads
 

Thanks Jim,
I passed the info on and added the link to the QBA website.

Cheers,
Dan Yager
QBA Editor
www.quickheads.com

On Tue, 12 Jul 2011 22:07:40 -0000, Jim P wrote:
The number I had in Arizona is no longer vaild. Try this:
http://www.airheart-brakes.com [1]

Airheart Brake Products
3800 County Road 116, Hamel, MN 55340 | Toll Free: 800-328-2174 |
Phone (763)478-8000 | Fax (763)478-8080


UV damage

Rick Hole
 

N1711Q is well into that age, built in 1982. When working on damaged areas
we sanding carefully to expose fiberglass in several areas. It looked very
good. That's a single data point, but it falls in line with similar repairs
on Velocities which are constructed with similar technique and materials.



For a plane stored in the sun the answer may be different.



I've seen awful messes for planes which were parked outside without primer,
or thinly primed, and became dumpster bait. I would not consider repairing
any surface in that condition.



Rick Hole


Re: UV damage

quickieaircraft
 

Quick rule of thumb: supporting a monoplane by the wingtips loads the wingspar by something roughly equivalent to a 2G load. You can verify this with some simple math, or a piece of balsa and some weights.

UV damage is a given after a certain amount of time on unprimed surfaces. I'm wondering about the finished surfaces that we don't regularly inspect. Maybe I'm just being overly cautious, but I have to wonder, after 10-20 years, is the paint/primer still protecting against ALL UV damage? I'd want to have more than just a "wondering" to justify stripping and repainting.

Several labs have published on using IR spectroscopy to detect UV and heat damage and field-portable scanners are now available, though a little pricey. A business might be able to afford one, I might rent one if I had the option.

--- In Q-LIST@..., Mike Dwyer <q2pilot@...> wrote:


Many years ago I left an unprimed piece of fiberglass in the Florida sun as a test. After a while the resin went away leaving the white glass on the surface. I assume the resin basically evaporated. The elevator slot is a critical area, kind of like a mini wing spar so I'd be real careful there. Asking another builder if you should use a part that you know to be previously damaged is just trying to find someone else to help you justify a bad decision. If your building a tri-Q then there is less stress on the canard and you might get away with it. Putting a new lamination on top of a contaminated layer is at best a waste of time. Try laminating two plys together with one piece of glass exposed to one drop of water and see what happens...



I calculated that the Q200 canard has the equivalent of 4G on it when loaded to gross on the ground, plus it is supported by the wing tips. Load a Cessna to gross (not even 4X) and pick it up by the wing tips some time, you'll be buying some new wings. In other words your stress test may have been ok for flight loads but I seriously doubt you tested for landing loads.



There are old pilots and there are bold pilots... but there are no old, bold pilots.



Mike Q200 N3QP


________________________________
To: Q-LIST@...
From: quickieaircraft@...
Date: Tue, 12 Jul 2011 20:34:28 +0000
Subject: [Q-LIST] Re: UV damage




Does anyone know if there is a decent way to inspect for UV damage once
primer and finish is applied? I know...there shouldn't be any damage
through the paint and primer, but...well, I think most of us still
store our composite planes indoors just in case.

http://www.vafarchive.com/msg/rv10/t2002323000

--- In Q-LIST@...<mailto:Q-LIST@...>, "Allan
Farr" <afarr@> wrote:

Thanks Mike
Actually, I'm less worried now. The main area of UV damage (or dry
lay-up) are the elevator slots (t/e of canard), so it seems to me that
at worst I will just have to replace that (or maybe add an extra ply of
bid on top?). I will get a local Varieeze builder to have a look. What
brought this about is finding that the a/c doesn't have the black UV
protection, just a yellow (ochre?) undercoat/filler, with gloss white
on top. It's possible these paints have UV protection built in, but it
would be good to know for sure as UV here in NZ is about as extreme as
it comes (we live under a hole in the ozone). The a/c has previously
had a stress test on the canard & wing which it passed with no
"cracking or popping" & with the wings returning to their original
positions, so I presume it must be basically sound.
Allan F

----- Original Message -----
From: Mike Dwyer
To: Q-LIST@...<mailto:Q-LIST@...>
Sent: Tuesday, 13 March 2007 12:39
Subject: Re: [Q-LIST] UV damage


That is absolutely UV damage. I would scrap the plane as you don't know
how much delamination/damage was done to the underlying foam. Your life
is worth more than it would cost to build new parts.
Mike Q200 N3QP 1000+ hours

Allan Farr wrote:
Some of the visible fibreglass on my plane (cockpit, elevator slots
on canard, etc.) shows a lot of cloth & very little resin. Does anyone
know if this is likely to be UV damage, or perhaps just a dry layup?
Also, I would like some info on manufacturing the elevator trim system,
is this available?
Allan F.
Q2 Rev 99% completed by others.








N1711Q Update

Rick Hole
 

In the last several days we ran solved issues of no-alternator and
no-fuel-flow-indication. Those were wiring issues but did require pulling
the engine.



Today's engine test let us cross off the task list idle RPM and mixture, an
unimportant engine alert indicator (who cares if EGT is below 1000!, at
least not for now).



The fuel level indicator problem is solved and the plane is ready to begin
its conditional inspection. There's an indentation on the wing to fill,
trivial. Tomorrow: bleed brakes and do a full power run up, and adjust prop
pitch for static RPM limit.



I will be off the project for a week. It should be ready to fly when I come
back to it. It's getting exciting to see the task list shrink towards
absolute zero :-)



Rick Hole

N1711Q Q200 rebuild at 99% complete and 1% to go


Re: UV damage

Larry Severson
 

Does anyone know if there is a decent way to inspect for UV damage once primer and finish is applied?

UV damaged fiberglass is milky. One could pick an exposed area and sand down to the fiberglass. Not good, but better than risking flying a plane UV damaged.

I know...there shouldn't be any damage through the paint and primer, but...well, I think most of us still store our composite planes indoors just in case.

Do you really know what the UV status of that hangered plane? How good was the original paint job? Tests that I have seen show that it takes about 5mm of UV protecting paint over the whole surface. But time of exposure and amount of UV encountered (10 years in Florida weather) needs to be significant with the 5mm protection.

I am working with PTI and a local technical college to establish optimum paint requirements. PTI produces mil spec paints, and is available at Aircraft Spruce,

--
Larry Severson
18242 Peters Ct
Fountain Valley, CA 92708
(714) 968-9852


Re: Q2 Brake Rotors. . .

Jim Patillo
 

The number I had in Arizona is no longer vaild. Try this: http://www.airheart-brakes.com


Airheart Brake Products
3800 County Road 116, Hamel, MN 55340 | Toll Free: 800-328-2174 | Phone (763)478-8000 | Fax (763)478-8080

--- In Q-LIST@..., dan@... wrote:

Thanks Jim,
Please send me the info when you get to the office. I'll send it along
to Gus, and post it on the QBA website as well.

Thanks again,
Dan Yager
QBA Editor
www.quickheads.com



On Tue, 12 Jul 2011 16:05:05 -0000, Jim P wrote:
Gus / Dan,

The original brakes on the Q2 - Q200 were Hurst Airheart calipers,
discs and pads. They work very well on a Q so long as you do one of
the brake mods such as the "LaRue Brake Mod" or something equivalent.
When I get to my office today, I will send you the phone number for
a company in Arizona that supplies them, if you wish.

Jim Patillo


Re: UV damage

Mike Dwyer
 

Many years ago I left an unprimed piece of fiberglass in the Florida sun as a test. After a while the resin went away leaving the white glass on the surface. I assume the resin basically evaporated. The elevator slot is a critical area, kind of like a mini wing spar so I'd be real careful there. Asking another builder if you should use a part that you know to be previously damaged is just trying to find someone else to help you justify a bad decision. If your building a tri-Q then there is less stress on the canard and you might get away with it. Putting a new lamination on top of a contaminated layer is at best a waste of time. Try laminating two plys together with one piece of glass exposed to one drop of water and see what happens...



I calculated that the Q200 canard has the equivalent of 4G on it when loaded to gross on the ground, plus it is supported by the wing tips. Load a Cessna to gross (not even 4X) and pick it up by the wing tips some time, you'll be buying some new wings. In other words your stress test may have been ok for flight loads but I seriously doubt you tested for landing loads.



There are old pilots and there are bold pilots... but there are no old, bold pilots.



Mike Q200 N3QP


________________________________

To: Q-LIST@...
From: quickieaircraft@...
Date: Tue, 12 Jul 2011 20:34:28 +0000
Subject: [Q-LIST] Re: UV damage




Does anyone know if there is a decent way to inspect for UV damage once
primer and finish is applied? I know...there shouldn't be any damage
through the paint and primer, but...well, I think most of us still
store our composite planes indoors just in case.

http://www.vafarchive.com/msg/rv10/t2002323000

--- In Q-LIST@...<mailto:Q-LIST@...>, "Allan
Farr" <afarr@...> wrote:

Thanks Mike
Actually, I'm less worried now. The main area of UV damage (or dry
lay-up) are the elevator slots (t/e of canard), so it seems to me that
at worst I will just have to replace that (or maybe add an extra ply of
bid on top?). I will get a local Varieeze builder to have a look. What
brought this about is finding that the a/c doesn't have the black UV
protection, just a yellow (ochre?) undercoat/filler, with gloss white
on top. It's possible these paints have UV protection built in, but it
would be good to know for sure as UV here in NZ is about as extreme as
it comes (we live under a hole in the ozone). The a/c has previously
had a stress test on the canard & wing which it passed with no
"cracking or popping" & with the wings returning to their original
positions, so I presume it must be basically sound.
Allan F

----- Original Message -----
From: Mike Dwyer
To: Q-LIST@...<mailto:Q-LIST@...>
Sent: Tuesday, 13 March 2007 12:39
Subject: Re: [Q-LIST] UV damage


That is absolutely UV damage. I would scrap the plane as you don't know
how much delamination/damage was done to the underlying foam. Your life
is worth more than it would cost to build new parts.
Mike Q200 N3QP 1000+ hours

Allan Farr wrote:
Some of the visible fibreglass on my plane (cockpit, elevator slots
on canard, etc.) shows a lot of cloth & very little resin. Does anyone
know if this is likely to be UV damage, or perhaps just a dry layup?
Also, I would like some info on manufacturing the elevator trim system,
is this available?
Allan F.
Q2 Rev 99% completed by others.





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: UV damage

quickieaircraft
 

Does anyone know if there is a decent way to inspect for UV damage once primer and finish is applied? I know...there shouldn't be any damage through the paint and primer, but...well, I think most of us still store our composite planes indoors just in case.

http://www.vafarchive.com/msg/rv10/t2002323000

--- In Q-LIST@..., "Allan Farr" <afarr@...> wrote:

Thanks Mike
Actually, I'm less worried now. The main area of UV damage (or dry lay-up) are the elevator slots (t/e of canard), so it seems to me that at worst I will just have to replace that (or maybe add an extra ply of bid on top?). I will get a local Varieeze builder to have a look. What brought this about is finding that the a/c doesn't have the black UV protection, just a yellow (ochre?) undercoat/filler, with gloss white on top. It's possible these paints have UV protection built in, but it would be good to know for sure as UV here in NZ is about as extreme as it comes (we live under a hole in the ozone). The a/c has previously had a stress test on the canard & wing which it passed with no "cracking or popping" & with the wings returning to their original positions, so I presume it must be basically sound.
Allan F

----- Original Message -----
From: Mike Dwyer
To: Q-LIST@...
Sent: Tuesday, 13 March 2007 12:39
Subject: Re: [Q-LIST] UV damage


That is absolutely UV damage. I would scrap the plane as you don't know
how much delamination/damage was done to the underlying foam. Your life
is worth more than it would cost to build new parts.
Mike Q200 N3QP 1000+ hours

Allan Farr wrote:
> Some of the visible fibreglass on my plane (cockpit, elevator slots on canard, etc.) shows a lot of cloth & very little resin. Does anyone know if this is likely to be UV damage, or perhaps just a dry layup? Also, I would like some info on manufacturing the elevator trim system, is this available?
> Allan F.
> Q2 Rev 99% completed by others.
>
>
>






Re: Q2 Brake Rotors. . .

Pat Panzera <panzera@...>
 

Why not invite Gus to join this list and get his questions answered first
hand?

On Tue, Jul 12, 2011 at 9:08 AM, <dan@...> wrote:

Thanks Jim,
Please send me the info when you get to the office. I'll send it along
to Gus, and post it on the QBA website as well.

Thanks again,
Dan Yager
QBA Editor
www.quickheads.com



On Tue, 12 Jul 2011 16:05:05 -0000, Jim P wrote:
Gus / Dan,

The original brakes on the Q2 - Q200 were Hurst Airheart calipers,
discs and pads. They work very well on a Q so long as you do one of
the brake mods such as the "LaRue Brake Mod" or something equivalent.
When I get to my office today, I will send you the phone number for
a company in Arizona that supplies them, if you wish.

Jim Patillo


------------------------------------

Quickie Builders Association WEB site
http://www.quickiebuilders.org

Yahoo! Groups Links





Re: Q2 Brake Rotors. . .

quickheads
 

Thanks Jim,
Please send me the info when you get to the office. I'll send it along to Gus, and post it on the QBA website as well.

Thanks again,
Dan Yager
QBA Editor
www.quickheads.com

On Tue, 12 Jul 2011 16:05:05 -0000, Jim P wrote:
Gus / Dan,

The original brakes on the Q2 - Q200 were Hurst Airheart calipers,
discs and pads. They work very well on a Q so long as you do one of
the brake mods such as the "LaRue Brake Mod" or something equivalent.
When I get to my office today, I will send you the phone number for
a company in Arizona that supplies them, if you wish.

Jim Patillo


Re: Q2 Brake Rotors. . .

Jim Patillo
 

Gus / Dan,

The original brakes on the Q2 - Q200 were Hurst Airheart calipers, discs and pads. They work very well on a Q so long as you do one of the brake mods such as the "LaRue Brake Mod" or something equivalent.
When I get to my office today, I will send you the phone number for a company in Arizona that supplies them, if you wish.

Jim Patillo

--- In Q-LIST@..., "quickheads" <dan@...> wrote:

Hey All,
I received an e-mail throught he QBA website about the brake rotors used on the Q2 kits. I'm attaching the e-mail below. If anyone knows the answer to his questions please let me know and I'll pass it along to him.

Thanks,
Dan Yager
QBA Editor
www.quickheads.com
_____________________________________

Dan-
During the course of a move the brake rotors to our plane have disappeared.. It's an old style Q2 and when we bought it we received very little documentation with it. Anyway, I am trying to find out which brakes were supposed to be on this plane- I realize you might not come up with the same ones that were used on this plane, but at least it would be a place to start.. Thank you in advance for any help you may be able to provide in this search...
Gus Raiford


Q2 Brake Rotors. . .

quickheads
 

Hey All,
I received an e-mail throught he QBA website about the brake rotors used on the Q2 kits. I'm attaching the e-mail below. If anyone knows the answer to his questions please let me know and I'll pass it along to him.

Thanks,
Dan Yager
QBA Editor
www.quickheads.com
_____________________________________

Dan-
During the course of a move the brake rotors to our plane have disappeared.. It's an old style Q2 and when we bought it we received very little documentation with it. Anyway, I am trying to find out which brakes were supposed to be on this plane- I realize you might not come up with the same ones that were used on this plane, but at least it would be a place to start.. Thank you in advance for any help you may be able to provide in this search...
Gus Raiford


Re: Was Reflexer - Reflexor - now Thanks for Visiting

Jim Patillo
 

Charlie and Bob,

It was really good to see you both again this weekend. It was a fun event with a good turn out. It's always fun when you two show up. I just wish I had, had more time to spend with my brother John before he passed on. He was way to young at 59 years.

Your DF is about to happen and its lookin' great. I don't want the first pax ride but will take you up on one, the next time we meet.

As a side note, Jennifer dropped me off at the Calaveras Airport about 5:00 PM yesterday and I was back at LVK Airport before she passed the ranch on her way back to the bay area. Flying time, 22 minutes!

Hope you had a good trip back to the "real" hills.

Regards,
Jim Patillo
N46JP

--- In Q-LIST@..., oneskydog@ wrote:

My $.02,

In a tri gear the canard has to develop enough lift to lift the nose before
the rear wing lifts or you will wheelbarrow like Sanjay. Fixing it
involves dumping lift from the rear wing by - flaps on the rear wing. You ban also
increase the incidence angle of the canard to the ground to get more lift
from the canard in the ground roll before the rear wing kicks in with
ailerons in trail.

As for spellings neither are recognized but the root word reflex as
pertaining to airfoils a starting point is.

_http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Camber_(aerodynamics_
(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Camber_(aerodynamics) )

If you are wheelbarrowing or jumping off the runway after a long high speed
ground roll, you may want to look at angles of successful planes Bruce
Crain's comes to mind as well as others.

Off the box,

One Sky Dog


In a message dated 7/10/2011 8:27:16 P.M. Mountain Daylight Time,
wypaul2001@ writes:

I am just wondering about the reflexer setting that TriQ fliers are using
for take-off. With the recent discussion of take-off speeds and the
pressure exerted on the nose wheel before lift-off is anyone setting the reflexer
to reduce the pressure on the nose wheel? Just curious.

While on the subject of reflexer I spent some time thinking about the word
reflexer. Reflex is a Latin derived word and with these words the
agentive suffix "or" is usually added so with that in mind maybe it should be
reflexor. I have seen it both ways on this list and have spelled it both ways
myself. But wait a minute, in America we tend to add the suffix "er" w
hether it is Latin based or not and in the UK they tend to add "or" Latin
based or not. So I guess that we have words like advisor and adviser used at
different colleges and schools throughout the US. I know I have strange
thoughts when I wake-up in the middle of the night but I was just wonder if
you will be using your reflexer or your reflexor on your next take-off and
landing.



------------------------------------

Quickie Builders Association WEB site
http://www.quickiebuilders.org

Yahoo! Groups Links






[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Reflexer

Jim Patillo
 

Charlie and Bob,

It was really good to see you both again this weekend. It was a fun event with a good turn out. It's always fun when you two show up. I just wish I had, had more time to spend with my brother John before he passed on. He was way to young at 59 years.

Your DF is about to happen and its lookin' great. I don't want the first pax ride but will take you up on one, the next time we meet.

As a side note, Jennifer dropped me off at the Calaveras Airport about 5:00 PM yesterday and I was back at LVK Airport before she passed the ranch on her way back to the bay area. Flying time, 22 minutes!

Hope you had a good trip back to the "real" hills.

Regards,
Jim Patillo
N46JP

--- In Q-LIST@..., oneskydog@... wrote:

My $.02,

In a tri gear the canard has to develop enough lift to lift the nose before
the rear wing lifts or you will wheelbarrow like Sanjay. Fixing it
involves dumping lift from the rear wing by - flaps on the rear wing. You ban also
increase the incidence angle of the canard to the ground to get more lift
from the canard in the ground roll before the rear wing kicks in with
ailerons in trail.

As for spellings neither are recognized but the root word reflex as
pertaining to airfoils a starting point is.

_http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Camber_(aerodynamics_
(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Camber_(aerodynamics) )

If you are wheelbarrowing or jumping off the runway after a long high speed
ground roll, you may want to look at angles of successful planes Bruce
Crain's comes to mind as well as others.

Off the box,

One Sky Dog


In a message dated 7/10/2011 8:27:16 P.M. Mountain Daylight Time,
wypaul2001@... writes:

I am just wondering about the reflexer setting that TriQ fliers are using
for take-off. With the recent discussion of take-off speeds and the
pressure exerted on the nose wheel before lift-off is anyone setting the reflexer
to reduce the pressure on the nose wheel? Just curious.

While on the subject of reflexer I spent some time thinking about the word
reflexer. Reflex is a Latin derived word and with these words the
agentive suffix "or" is usually added so with that in mind maybe it should be
reflexor. I have seen it both ways on this list and have spelled it both ways
myself. But wait a minute, in America we tend to add the suffix "er" w
hether it is Latin based or not and in the UK they tend to add "or" Latin
based or not. So I guess that we have words like advisor and adviser used at
different colleges and schools throughout the US. I know I have strange
thoughts when I wake-up in the middle of the night but I was just wonder if
you will be using your reflexer or your reflexor on your next take-off and
landing.



------------------------------------

Quickie Builders Association WEB site
http://www.quickiebuilders.org

Yahoo! Groups Links






[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Guess what I'm holding in my hand.

Fisher Paul A. <fisherpaula@...>
 

CONGRATULATIONS Jerry! That's very exciting. Plenty of time to complete those test flights before the September Field of Dreams fly-in!

- Paul


From: Q-LIST@... [mailto:Q-LIST@...] On Behalf Of brinkerhuf@...
Sent: Friday, July 08, 2011 17:11
To: Q-LIST@...
Subject: [Q-LIST] Guess what I'm holding in my hand.



It could be a cold premium Grain Belt beer but it's not. No, it's my brand new pink airworthiness certificate complements of the FAA. After 2 long months of waiting I'm approved. Now it's off to the airport. Let the fun begin. Jerry Brinkerhuff Q-200 Airworthy and ready to taxi/fly.


Re: Reflexer

Bruce Crain
 

I still have to have a pretty high speed taxi to get the front lifted off the ground. Then I still have to watch to make sure I don't come back down on the runway after lift off. The best thing that the 1.5 up incidence on the canard did for me was to make the view over the nose in cruise much better. BruceBy the way Paul and Charlie I love your syntax in those philosophic musings reflexor, reflexer, potato potahto, tomato, tomahto. ;o)

---------- Original Message ----------
From: oneskydog@...
To: Q-LIST@...
Subject: Re: [Q-LIST] Reflexer
Date: Sun, 10 Jul 2011 22:59:39 EDT


My $.02,

In a tri gear the canard has to develop enough lift to lift the nose before
the rear wing lifts or you will wheelbarrow like Sanjay. Fixing it
involves dumping lift from the rear wing by - flaps on the rear wing. You ban also
increase the incidence angle of the canard to the ground to get more lift
from the canard in the ground roll before the rear wing kicks in with
ailerons in trail.

As for spellings neither are recognized but the root word reflex as
pertaining to airfoils a starting point is.

_http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Camber_(aerodynamics_
(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Camber_(aerodynamics) )

If you are wheelbarrowing or jumping off the runway after a long high speed
ground roll, you may want to look at angles of successful planes Bruce
Crain's comes to mind as well as others.

Off the box,

One Sky Dog


In a message dated 7/10/2011 8:27:16 P.M. Mountain Daylight Time,
wypaul2001@... writes:

I am just wondering about the reflexer setting that TriQ fliers are using
for take-off. With the recent discussion of take-off speeds and the
pressure exerted on the nose wheel before lift-off is anyone setting the reflexer
to reduce the pressure on the nose wheel? Just curious.

While on the subject of reflexer I spent some time thinking about the word
reflexer. Reflex is a Latin derived word and with these words the
agentive suffix "or" is usually added so with that in mind maybe it should be
reflexor. I have seen it both ways on this list and have spelled it both ways
myself. But wait a minute, in America we tend to add the suffix "er" w
hether it is Latin based or not and in the UK they tend to add "or" Latin
based or not. So I guess that we have words like advisor and adviser used at
different colleges and schools throughout the US. I know I have strange
thoughts when I wake-up in the middle of the night but I was just wonder if
you will be using your reflexer or your reflexor on your next take-off and
landing.

------------------------------------

Quickie Builders Association WEB site
http://www.quickiebuilders.org

Yahoo! Groups Links





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