Date   

Re: The Passing of Paul Lipps. . .

Patrick Panzera <panzera@...>
 

I love Paul like my father, but I had to open his emails with caution if I
had my grand kids around. I never knew what to expect, as far too often his
emails were a little "off color."

On Wed, Oct 19, 2011 at 2:33 PM, <dan@...> wrote:

Pat,
I just got my copy of Experimenter and I was sad to see that Paul Lipps
had passed away. (After a struggle with Lung Cancer.)

Many of us met him last year at the Livermore Fly-in and he was a
really neat guy. He did say some embarrassing things in front of my
sister, but it was very funny! (Something about putting the the word
PUSS in front of his company name ELIPSE.)

Our thoughts and prayers go out to his family. He will be missed.

Dan Yager
QBA Editor
www.quickheads.com




------------------------------------

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Yahoo! Groups Links





The Passing of Paul Lipps. . .

quickheads
 

Pat,
I just got my copy of Experimenter and I was sad to see that Paul Lipps had passed away. (After a struggle with Lung Cancer.)

Many of us met him last year at the Livermore Fly-in and he was a really neat guy. He did say some embarrassing things in front of my sister, but it was very funny! (Something about putting the the word PUSS in front of his company name ELIPSE.)

Our thoughts and prayers go out to his family. He will be missed.

Dan Yager
QBA Editor
www.quickheads.com


Q Accident Reports. . .

quickheads
 

Mike Evans is helping me compile accident data on our beloved Q's. We have the most recent set of DATA from the NTSB here in the US, and we've compared it to the "QUICKIE.txt" that used to appear on David Gall's "Quickie Source" website.

The TXT document had 230 accidents listed, but several of them were not Quickies. Some were showing up in search results because the manufacturer or model had a "Q" in the name. (Or for other various reasons.)

My intention is to create a database (with data from multiple countries), that is searchable, for people interested in finding out "How many Q accidents were caused by. . ."

In the meantime, I made a "quick and dirty" web page with a list of all Quickie accidents I could find in the most recent NTSB data. (169 Total)

You can find that here: http://www.quickheads.com/q-accident-reports.html

The DATE links to the NTSB accident report.
The N-NUMBER links to the FAA registry.

If anyone outside the U.S. would like to help compile information from your home country, please contact me OFFLIST and I will send you an MS Excel template that you can use to record the data. (This will help me format your data in the new database.)

Also, I am interested in collecting some "Tribal Knowledge" about these accidents so that we can encourage good decision making, and good judgement in the community.

If you have additional FACTUAL information, pictures, or data concerning any of the accidents, please let me know. I will add these materials to the database, and link to them from the search results.

As always. . . I appreciate all of your help.

Warm regards,
Dan Yager
QBA Editor
www.quickheads.com


Re: G-BWIZ Tri Q200 gets to the air

quickieaircraft
 

Cool. I gotta ask, what are the two "bang" sounds after the nosewheel goes "bang"?

Also, what airspeeds were you using? Where does the green arc start?

Way to go on the flight, Mick!

-if

--- In Q-LIST@..., "Mick Davies" <mickdavies1967@...> wrote:

I've uploaded the video to Youtube.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=olzTQUxSL_M


----- Original Message -----
From: Richard
To: Q-LIST@...
Sent: Monday, October 17, 2011 8:56 PM
Subject: [Q-LIST] Re: G-BWIZ Tri Q200 gets to the air



Hi Mick,

Well done for completing 2 things in one.

1st A successful First Flight

2nd Another UK based TriQ - I don't feel so much of a freak now.

So where is your Air Brake handle situated, and what does it look like ? post some photos please.

Good luck

Rich T

TriQ200

UK.






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Re: G-BWIZ Tri Q200 gets to the air

Paul Buckley
 

Fabulous!

The only thing is, I was expecting to see your big, ear to ear, grin...........with perhaps a glass of bubbly!

Paul B.

----- Original Message -----
From: Mick Davies
To: Q-LIST@...
Sent: Wednesday, October 19, 2011 7:52 PM
Subject: Re: [Q-LIST] Re: G-BWIZ Tri Q200 gets to the air



I've uploaded the video to Youtube.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=olzTQUxSL_M

----- Original Message -----
From: Richard
To: Q-LIST@...
Sent: Monday, October 17, 2011 8:56 PM
Subject: [Q-LIST] Re: G-BWIZ Tri Q200 gets to the air

Hi Mick,

Well done for completing 2 things in one.

1st A successful First Flight

2nd Another UK based TriQ - I don't feel so much of a freak now.

So where is your Air Brake handle situated, and what does it look like ? post some photos please.

Good luck

Rich T

TriQ200

UK.



No virus found in this message.
Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
Version: 2012.0.1831 / Virus Database: 2092/4559 - Release Date: 10/18/11






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Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
Version: 10.0.1411 / Virus Database: 1522/3960 - Release Date: 10/18/11


Re: G-BWIZ Tri Q200 gets to the air

Mick Davies <mickdavies1967@...>
 

I've uploaded the video to Youtube.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=olzTQUxSL_M

----- Original Message -----
From: Richard
To: Q-LIST@...
Sent: Monday, October 17, 2011 8:56 PM
Subject: [Q-LIST] Re: G-BWIZ Tri Q200 gets to the air



Hi Mick,

Well done for completing 2 things in one.

1st A successful First Flight

2nd Another UK based TriQ - I don't feel so much of a freak now.

So where is your Air Brake handle situated, and what does it look like ? post some photos please.

Good luck

Rich T

TriQ200

UK.






No virus found in this message.
Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
Version: 2012.0.1831 / Virus Database: 2092/4559 - Release Date: 10/18/11


Re: Brinkerhoff Prelim

Gary McKirdy
 

Yes Bruce and I could have added treat every take off like it is an abort
first until you are sure it isn't and every landing as a go arround until
you are sure it isn't.
Not withstanding mechanical problems that is the only way to save the day
with a guarantee.
Gary

On 19 Oct 2011 13:29, "jcrain2@..." <jcrain2@...> wrote:

**


You have done your homework Gary. The one thing that you said is so
important. Keep your altitude and airspeed high when turning short downwind,
base, to final and you should be ok.Use long runways that you can leave lots
of runway behind you on landing without over-running at the end.Bruce

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Re: Brinkerhoff Prelim

Bruce Crain
 

You have done your homework Gary. The one thing that you said is so important. Keep your altitude and airspeed high when turning short downwind, base, to final and you should be ok.Use long runways that you can leave lots of runway behind you on landing without over-running at the end.Bruce

____________________________________________________________
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Re: Brinkerhoff Prelim

Gary McKirdy
 

Great timely post Bruce.

Something I demonstrate to the new Qbies I fly with is the speed bleeding
back slowly on finals death trap.

By accident or pilot input it is a fact that the nearer to pitch buck speed
you get the more the nose needs to be firmly held up with elevator
especially after bringing the power back. This can easily be trimmed out
with reflexor but the nose will still drop as you slow further.

If you are high and slowing gradually, the picture out front begins to look
more like a conventional approach in a normal aircraft. You even get the
benefit of being able to see the runway over the nose better so all good
right?

Because the forward speed is still relatively high compared to what you flew
before you may not notice the descent rate starting to build to match.

I can demonstrate 1500ft per minute in a GU Q and less but still 1000 ft ish
per minute in an LS1 or Waddelow.

THE POINT IS IT STILL ALL LOOKS AND FEELS PERFECTLY NORMAL.

So you are now on the back of the drag curve but the fuselage waterline is
near horizontal whilst the real angle of attack might be 10-16 degrees.

Who would of guessed that if you don't now add full power by 250ft AGL in
some Q's you may already have left it too late.

If you left it to 150ft AGL you will impact within 6-8 seconds regardless of
what power you now set.

That may not be on the airfield!

Remember you had to be able to accelerate to be able to pull more than 1 G
just to turn the flight path back to horizontal to flare.

IF IT IS ALREADY TOO LATE THERE IS NO RECOVERY!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

I say again;


IF IT IS ALREADY TOO LATE THERE IS NO RECOVERY!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Whilst this back of the drag curve trap is true of all aircraft to some
degree, with 55sq feet of wing area to arrest any rate of descent takes much
more time and power and height than the new wannabe test pilot has any right
to know about from the P.O.H.

If anyone wants to explore this make absolutely sure you do it at a safe
height first where you need to focus acutely on the ASI and altimeter and
VSI if you have one and on an approach to see the ground rush initially have
an extra 500ft more than you thought you needed.

I give an extreme exaple to demonstrate a very important trap for the
unwary. It still applies in some measure to correct any descent to be able
to flare so YOU MUST ALWAYS BE READY TO USE THE THROTTLE EARLY TO CONTROL
DESCENT PATH.

But what if it does not respond?

That is why you want the maximum excess runway length possible for testing
like Bruce rightly says. It is so you can abort the take off safely and
glide in with a stopped prop.

TO NOT USE THE BIGGEST RUNWAY AVAILABLE IS TO HAVE FAILED TO PLAN AND
PLANNED TO FAIL.

IN SO DOING YOU LET DOWN THE ENTIRE WORLD Q COMMUNITY WHO HELPED YOU GET
THERE.


Regards
Gary

On Wed, Oct 19, 2011 at 5:03 AM, jcrain2@... <jcrain2@...> wrote:

**


I realize that it is to early to know what happened to Jerry. I am not
trying to answer that question. I see a commonality in 2 different Quickie
aircraft crashes though. The 1st is the crash in California of Phil
Lankford's Q200. Phil knows all of this from past talks with him. And the
2nd is of course Jerry's crash. Both of the crashes came up short of the
runway on landing. With this in mind I would like to reiterate a couple of
things that I have already said to the group.1. Find a loooong runway to use
for 1st flights. (6000+ would be great)2. Every landing should be treated as
an engine out. Don't make a loooog down wind just because it makes you feel
like you need time to "line her up" perfectly. (I have about 800+ hrs in a
Quickie and I try to do that every landing as much as I can). With a 73 mph
stall speed the descent rate is going to be high (remember what Jimmeh has
always said "it is a high performance" fast airplane.) If you come in to
high just side slip and she will come down quickly but leave a lot of runway
behind you when you land. That's the reason for a long runway. You don't and
shouldn't try to put this airplane on the numbers especially at first. Turn
base to final quickly as though you are fighting for your life to make it to
the runway! I am also offering a 3rd point that may or may not have been
involved with Jerry's accident. That is "throttle slamming". When you are
landing and see that you are coming up short, make a decision early and feed
in throttle slowly. Seems I read that in the POH of an airplane or some
periodical somewhere that if you "slam the throttle to quickly it will
stumble and maybe not recover." If it stumbles a lot take out the carb heat
on final that may help. Try throttle slamming, stopped from a slow idle,
some time at the end of the runway on the ground and see what happens
without taking off. You elected to be the test pilot. Give yourself a
fighting chance every take off and landing. Leave your self an out should
something not go right. Stay tight with the runway. Your first flights
should always be close enough to the runway to make it home safe. Slow
flight and testing should be directly over the runway at an altitude that
keeps you out of the way of other aircraft and will produce a glide back to
the runway. Bruce
__________________________________________________________
57-Year-Old Mom Looks 25
Mom Reveals $5 Wrinkle Trick That Has Angered Doctors!
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--
All the best airfields in Southern Britain are in Northern France.


Brinkerhoff Prelim

Bruce Crain
 

I realize that it is to early to know what happened to Jerry. I am not trying to answer that question. I see a commonality in 2 different Quickie aircraft crashes though. The 1st is the crash in California of Phil Lankford's Q200. Phil knows all of this from past talks with him. And the 2nd is of course Jerry's crash. Both of the crashes came up short of the runway on landing. With this in mind I would like to reiterate a couple of things that I have already said to the group.1. Find a loooong runway to use for 1st flights. (6000+ would be great)2. Every landing should be treated as an engine out. Don't make a loooog down wind just because it makes you feel like you need time to "line her up" perfectly. (I have about 800+ hrs in a Quickie and I try to do that every landing as much as I can). With a 73 mph stall speed the descent rate is going to be high (remember what Jimmeh has always said "it is a high performance" fast airplane.) If you come in to high just side slip and she will come down quickly but leave a lot of runway behind you when you land. That's the reason for a long runway. You don't and shouldn't try to put this airplane on the numbers especially at first. Turn base to final quickly as though you are fighting for your life to make it to the runway! I am also offering a 3rd point that may or may not have been involved with Jerry's accident. That is "throttle slamming". When you are landing and see that you are coming up short, make a decision early and feed in throttle slowly. Seems I read that in the POH of an airplane or some periodical somewhere that if you "slam the throttle to quickly it will stumble and maybe not recover." If it stumbles a lot take out the carb heat on final that may help. Try throttle slamming, stopped from a slow idle, some time at the end of the runway on the ground and see what happens without taking off. You elected to be the test pilot. Give yourself a fighting chance every take off and landing. Leave your self an out should something not go right. Stay tight with the runway. Your first flights should always be close enough to the runway to make it home safe. Slow flight and testing should be directly over the runway at an altitude that keeps you out of the way of other aircraft and will produce a glide back to the runway. Bruce
____________________________________________________________
57-Year-Old Mom Looks 25
Mom Reveals $5 Wrinkle Trick That Has Angered Doctors!
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Re: Local Broken Bow boy makes good.

Patrick Panzera <panzera@...>
 

On Tue, Oct 18, 2011 at 8:36 PM, Chris Adkins <ccadkins1@...>wrote:

MILES, not hours! :-)

75,000 miles per hour?!?!?!
Holy moly!



JK. ;)

pat


Re: Local Broken Bow boy makes good.

Lynn French
 

That's right Chris.
There were several things I could have helped to straighten out had a draft been sent to me before it was published. Oh well, I got a good chuckle out of it anyway.
LJ French

Short & simple from my mobile

On Oct 18, 2011, at 10:36 PM, "Chris Adkins" <ccadkins1@...> wrote:

MILES, not hours! :-)

-----Original Message-----
From: Q-LIST@... [mailto:Q-LIST@...] On Behalf Of robert clark
Sent: Monday, October 17, 2011 3:20 PM
To: Q-LIST@...
Subject: Re: [Q-LIST] Local Broken Bow boy makes good.

Since he started keeping track in 2005, Lynn French has flown
his plane about 75,000 hours.

I need to get more hours in the air to catch up to this number! Just kidding. Lynn.
Bob Clark


Re: Local Broken Bow boy makes good.

Chris Adkins
 

MILES, not hours! :-)

-----Original Message-----
From: Q-LIST@... [mailto:Q-LIST@...] On Behalf Of robert clark
Sent: Monday, October 17, 2011 3:20 PM
To: Q-LIST@...
Subject: Re: [Q-LIST] Local Broken Bow boy makes good.

Since he started keeping track in 2005, Lynn French has flown
his plane about 75,000 hours.

I need to get more hours in the air to catch up to this number! Just kidding. Lynn.
Bob Clark



________________________________




Check him out! He build the world's most efficient airplane and he isn't
even nervous any more.

http://www.kearneyhub.com/news/article_62722bba-f6f3-11e0-9bd1-001cc4c03286.html

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




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------------------------------------

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Yahoo! Groups Links


Re: Waddelow types, was Q-Flight CounselorPhil c.

Bruce Crain
 

Marc Waddelow did the calcs for a couple of longer wings and canards. I built mine to his 248" calcs but kept mine at 228" don't know why except that was somewhere between and Quickie and a Dragon Fly. You could still build the wings to 200" if you like.Bruce Crain

---------- Original Message ----------
From: "Richard" <richard@...>
To: <Q-LIST@...>
Subject: [Q-LIST] Re: Waddelow types, was Q-Flight CounselorPhil c.
Date: Tue, 18 Oct 2011 19:51:28 +0100


Hi Gary,

I thought it was you that said to stick with it, that seems best option. Less build time remaining
I have reflex on the Variviggen, but its done with Bells and Whistles ( or was that pulleys and wires ?). I have always preferred control rods, no tension to worry about.

Hi Bruce,

None of those things ring a bell, is there any difference in Wingspan of the Waddelow Main wing ? Is the standard TriQ Canard as wide as the Waddelow do you know ?

Rich T

TriQ 200

UK.





____________________________________________________________
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Re: G-BWIZ Tri Q200 gets to the air

Mick Davies <mickdavies1967@...>
 

Rich
The air brake lever is just behind the throttle lever on the left.
I'll post pics and video soon.
Mick

----- Original Message -----
From: Richard
To: Q-LIST@...
Sent: Monday, October 17, 2011 8:56 PM
Subject: [Q-LIST] Re: G-BWIZ Tri Q200 gets to the air



Hi Mick,

Well done for completing 2 things in one.

1st A successful First Flight

2nd Another UK based TriQ - I don't feel so much of a freak now.

So where is your Air Brake handle situated, and what does it look like ? post some photos please.

Good luck

Rich T

TriQ200

UK.






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Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
Version: 2012.0.1831 / Virus Database: 2092/4559 - Release Date: 10/18/11


Re: G-BWIZ Tri Q200 gets to the air

Mick Davies <mickdavies1967@...>
 

Hi,
Turweston is 800m length. Seemed to get airborn at 350m with single pilot, minimal fuel and zero wind component.
Mick

----- Original Message -----
From: "Thomas Cline" <tlc49x@...>
To: <Q-LIST@...>
Sent: Monday, October 17, 2011 1:08 AM
Subject: Re: [Q-LIST] G-BWIZ Tri Q200 gets to the air


Congrats on the excellent maiden voyage! Question: what runway length(s)
?? (So many others quote 6000 ft.)
Thanks. TLC/Thomas L Cline, N49X
===
On Sat, Oct 15, 2011 at 4:20 PM, Mick Davies <mickdavies1967@...>wrote:

**
Well, a bit of good news!
G-BWIZ Tri Q200 flew for the first time today (it flew a few hours in 1998,
but first time for me after buying it several years ago) from Turweston in
the UK. I bought it dismantled from a shed. I have had the engine overhauled
and new instruments put in as the previous owner took them for a new machine
in New Zealand.
When I originally got permission to test fly it wouldn't get airborne and
"wheel barrowed" down the runway.
After fitting a bigger diameter tyre the nose lifted by 1 inch. I was able
to do this with a new nose fork from F.L.A.P.S. which was 5in in width
rather than 4in to allow a bigger wheel. The reflexors were unsiezed (def
set them trailing edge up for take off), and 4kg of ballast in the rear to
bring the c of g aft.
Rotated at 70 kts and smoothly drifted into the air. A small check forward
on the stick only was required. 1100fpm rate of climb at 80 kts. Downwind
the airbrake was deployed, crossed the hedge at 80kts for an uneventful
landing. Back to the hanger, that's enough for one day and I need to check
it over after the first flight!

Thanks to all your comments and Gary McKirdy's advice. Got several hours of
testing stipulated by the LAA but nothing I wouldn't do anyway.
I have got a video of the flight but it's 750MB in size.
Mick Davies







------------------------------------

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http://www.quickiebuilders.org

Yahoo! Groups Links





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Re: Waddelow types, was Q-Flight CounselorPhil c.

Richard Thomson
 

Hi Gary,

I thought it was you that said to stick with it, that seems best option. Less build time remaining
I have reflex on the Variviggen, but its done with Bells and Whistles ( or was that pulleys and wires ?). I have always preferred control rods, no tension to worry about.


Hi Bruce,

None of those things ring a bell, is there any difference in Wingspan of the Waddelow Main wing ? Is the standard TriQ Canard as wide as the Waddelow do you know ?



Rich T

TriQ 200

UK.


New file uploaded to Q-LIST

Q-LIST@...
 

Hello,

This email message is a notification to let you know that
a file has been uploaded to the Files area of the Q-LIST
group.

File : /Crash/Phil Lankford Extraction Notes CRASH N870BM.pdf
Uploaded by : gobxoy@... <gobxoy@...>
Description : Phil Lankford extraction Notes Post No. 23459

You can access this file at the URL:
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Q-LIST/files/Crash/Phil%20Lankford%20Extraction%20Notes%20CRASH%20N870BM.pdf

To learn more about file sharing for your group, please visit:
http://help.yahoo.com/l/us/yahoo/groups/original/members/web/index.html
Regards,

gobxoy@... <gobxoy@...>


Re: Q-Flight CounselorPhil c.

Doug Tenney
 

Jim,

what type of main wing/canard does my plane (your old one) have on it? I thought I remember you saying it was the Waddelow , but I don't remember

DUG
(Doug Tenney)
N56DW TriQ C-85 (motor in rebuild mode)
Boise, ID




________________________________
From: Jim Doyle <flyer6549@...>
To: Q-LIST@...
Sent: Friday, October 14, 2011 1:49 PM
Subject: Re: [Q-LIST] Re: Q-Flight CounselorPhil c.


 
On 10/14/2011 10:46 AM, quickieaircraft wrote:

All of the posts have been spot on for the TRI-Q, the only thing I
would add is that you must be cognasant of the weight change on each
flight. I once took off with 2 people full fuel and luggage on board
and had the reflex set for just the pilot and full fuel. At rotation
it quickly over rotated. I was able to catch it with elevators but it
nearly put a smudge in my shorts. After that I was very careful about
checking trim settings on takeoff.
Jim Doyle
930 hours
ex Tri-Q C-85


Thank you for the correction. I think my confusion was from inadequate
differentiation between a TriQ and Q takeoff, which you'd already
pointed out.

If I'm now correct, the essential difference: while a taildragger
levitates off the ground in its ground attitude, a Q must be rotated
to that attitude.

The rotation comes from some combination of elevator/reflexor,
however, the progression of controls and arrangement of ground+thrust
forces means that upon lifting airborne, the nose up pitch moment must
rapidly be reduced. The procedure you described sounds much more like
a soft field takeoff in a spam can (full backpressure to start, reduce
pressure once nosewheel lifts, release more pressure once mains lift,
accelerate to Vx or Vy in ground effect).

It sounds like the "soft field takeoff" is what everyone is using. I'm
guessing this is because trimming for near neutral and attempting to
"fly the plane" off the ground (with some gradually increasing
elevator pressure) consumes an excessive amount of runway--or
potentially never lifts, if the ground angle of incidence isn't enough.

I'll add more soft field T/O's to the list and think about what this
means for landing.

-imraan
[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Waddelow types, was Q-Flight CounselorPhil c.

Bruce Crain
 

Hey Rich,I haven't flown the T-tail so someone else will have to fill you in on the differences. It has been discussed in distant past. I think the consensus was you don't need a T-tail with a reflexor (which has plenty of authority)The Waddelow main wing has a stepped down BID flat shear web across the back as well as tapered spar cap top and bottom. There is also a rib where the main wing joins the fuselage joins the wing. Also has 6" BID across the top and bottom where the rib is that joins the fuselage.. All this makes a much tougher, stiffer main wing. The down side is it's probably is a bit heavier.Hope this helpsBruce
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