Date   

Re: Torpedo heaters - epoxy contamination?

sanjay <Sanjay@...>
 

Charlie,  thanks.
 I am considering a Kerosene heater to keep me and the hangar warm, not much epoxy work, but the project is not painted so is there threat of some contamination on composite surface?

For curing epoxy I have been using plastic tenting around layup with space heater inside. 

Thanks
Sanjay

-------- Original message --------
From: "Charlie oneskydog@... [Q-LIST]" <Q-LIST@...>
Date: 12/17/17 5:40 PM (GMT-05:00)
To: Q-LIST@...
Subject: Re: [Q-LIST] Torpedo heaters - epoxy contamination?

 

Like propane or kerosene ?

Propane produces a lot of water vapor, this can react with epoxy cure agents to produce amine blush on the surface of your laminate. Amine blush can be removed by scrubbing with soap and water before sanding. If not removed before sanding it is just spread all over and will compromise subsequent bonding.

Kerosene heaters emit vaporized kerosene as well as water vapor.

I like local plastic tents with electric space heaters like the radiator kind to keep the layup warm untitled cured.

Regards,

Charlie Johnson


On Dec 17, 2017, at 3:08 PM, Sanjay@... [Q-LIST] <Q-LIST@...> wrote:

Is there a problem in using Torpedo heaters in workshop/ hangar while working on composite airplane projects? 

Thanks

Sanjay


Re: Torpedo heaters - epoxy contamination?

One Sky Dog
 

Like propane or kerosene ?

Propane produces a lot of water vapor, this can react with epoxy cure agents to produce amine blush on the surface of your laminate. Amine blush can be removed by scrubbing with soap and water before sanding. If not removed before sanding it is just spread all over and will compromise subsequent bonding.

Kerosene heaters emit vaporized kerosene as well as water vapor.

I like local plastic tents with electric space heaters like the radiator kind to keep the layup warm untitled cured.

Regards,

Charlie Johnson


On Dec 17, 2017, at 3:08 PM, Sanjay@... [Q-LIST] <Q-LIST@...> wrote:

Is there a problem in using Torpedo heaters in workshop/ hangar while working on composite airplane projects? 

Thanks

Sanjay


Torpedo heaters - epoxy contamination?

Sanjay@...
 

Is there a problem in using Torpedo heaters in workshop/ hangar while working on composite airplane projects? 

Thanks

Sanjay


Re: Update on Quickie Builders Association / Quickheads website

Jay Scheevel
 

Thanks Jon and Dan,

Looks good.

Cheers,
Jay Scheevel, Tri-Q still building


Re: Pre-buy Checklist

Chris Walterson
 

Shaun-----------  I don't have a Q but on my Dragonfly I needed to reinforce the area where my heals sit.  After about ten years it was a bit hollow. Drilled it, filled it with micro, and glassed multiple layers on top.  I am building a Q200 and this will be incorporated in the canard from the start.  Take care--------------  Chris


Update on Quickie Builders Association / Quickheads website

Jon Matcho
 

Hello,

 

The QBA website has been restored and is back online thanks to Dan’s key assistance.

 

http://www.quickheads.com

 

Looking forward, the site will be reworked into a platform that is better designed for maintenance and upkeep so that situations like these do not happen again.

 

Thank you for your patience and support, and please do not hesitate to let me know of any issues or suggestions.

 

Kind regards,

Jon

 

 

 

Jon Matcho

 

Repairing Quickie Tri-Q200 N479E

Building a Cozy Mark IV+

Quickie Builders Association Administrator www.quickheads.com

Canard Zone Administrator www.canardzone.com

Canard Avaitors Mailing List Administrator https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/canard-aviators


Re: Pre-buy Checklist

Sam Hoskins
 

I will send you my condition inspection checklist. Seven pages.

Sam

On Dec 15, 2017 5:07 PM, "Shaun Milke shaun_milke@... [Q-LIST]" <Q-LIST@...> wrote:
 

Hi and thanks for the add into the group!

I'm seriously considering buying a Q200 and am having a buddy take a look at the airplane for me this weekend.  I'm pretty familiar with general items to look for during a prebuy, but I was hoping I could get tips for some Q200-specific items to check for.  Common wear items, likely damage locations, service problems, approximate wear limits, etc. and general tips would be extremely helpful.

Thanks!
Shaun


Re: BRS Chute in a Q2

Bruce Crain
 


Re: BRS Chute in a Q2

Bruce Crain
 


Re: Pre-buy Checklist

Patrick Panzera
 

If it's actually a Q-200 it'll have factory-built tapered tubular carbon fiber spars, that are semi-exposed in the cockpit. Be sure to coin-tap test them inside the cockpit.

Pat 

On Dec 15, 2017 3:21 PM, "jay@... [Q-LIST]" <Q-LIST@...> wrote:
 

Look along the top surface of the canard. Any waviness means probable damage from hard landing (disqualifier unless you want to do extensive repairs).

Check log books and see when it last ran (long down time not a good sign).

check the locations where torque tubes enter the fuselage for any damage to the glass there means wings were over-flexed, not good.

Check cockpit for fuel stains or odors indicating tank leaks.

Check tailwheel assembly for cracks. If it is the original 5/8" fiberglass round rod tailspring, you will probably need to replace.

A positive sign would be if you see separate cables emerging from the fuselage to control the tail wheel and rudder independently. That would mean that a prior owner has been paying attention and has fixed some or all of the deficiencies in original design.

The rest are probably more like regular "plane stuff", or are easily updated.

Cheers,
Jay Scheevel, Tri-Q, still building


Re: Pre-buy Checklist

Jay Scheevel
 

Look along the top surface of the canard. Any waviness means probable damage from hard landing (disqualifier unless you want to do extensive repairs).

Check log books and see when it last ran (long down time not a good sign).

check the locations where torque tubes enter the fuselage for any damage to the glass there means wings were over-flexed, not good.

Check cockpit for fuel stains or odors indicating tank leaks.

Check tailwheel assembly for cracks. If it is the original 5/8" fiberglass round rod tailspring, you will probably need to replace.

A positive sign would be if you see separate cables emerging from the fuselage to control the tail wheel and rudder independently. That would mean that a prior owner has been paying attention and has fixed some or all of the deficiencies in original design.

The rest are probably more like regular "plane stuff", or are easily updated.

Cheers,
Jay Scheevel, Tri-Q, still building


Pre-buy Checklist

Shaun Milke
 

Hi and thanks for the add into the group!

I'm seriously considering buying a Q200 and am having a buddy take a look at the airplane for me this weekend.  I'm pretty familiar with general items to look for during a prebuy, but I was hoping I could get tips for some Q200-specific items to check for.  Common wear items, likely damage locations, service problems, approximate wear limits, etc. and general tips would be extremely helpful.

Thanks!
Shaun


Re: BRS Chute in a Q2

Jay Scheevel
 

According to my modeling, once you reach Vmin the only way to arrest the sink rate is with power, so I can see what you are saying Jerry.

Cheers,
Jay Scheevel, Tri-Q, still building


Re: BRS Chute in a Q2

Larry Severson
 

Not a chance. But, flying the q200 model in X-Plane a lot would help.

 

From: Q-LIST@... [mailto:Q-LIST@...]
Sent: Friday, December 15, 2017 6:07 AM
To: Q-LIST@...
Cc: Jerry Marstall
Subject: Re: [Q-LIST] BRS Chute in a Q2

 

 

Another perspective. Would anybody send a non pilot on a solo in a q 200 with only 10 hours of instruction? 

 

 

 

Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone



-------- Original message --------
From: "Paul Fisher rv7a.n18pf@... [Q-LIST]" <Q-LIST@...>
Date: 12/14/17 5:38 PM (GMT-05:00)
To: Q-LIST@...
Subject: Re: [Q-LIST] BRS Chute in a Q2

 

I'm trying to stay out of this ("if you can't say something nice, don't say anything at all"), but I will provide some real world numbers.  I've been flying my Q-200 taildragger for 27 years and have about 1,650 hours on it, so I think I can speak authoritatively about my particular airplane.

 

In a typical pattern I slow down to 120mph on downwind.  Abeam the numbers I slow to 100mph.  On short final I slow to 90mph.  My plane stops flying at 80mph, so I always touchdown at or above that number.

 

I have flown 152s.  I can't quote the speeds, but I know things happen considerably faster in my Q-200.  In my opinion anyone who thinks they are about the same has clearly never flown a Q-200 and is doing the community a disservice by implying they are.  Just my opinion.

 

Paul Fisher

Q-200 N17PF

 

On Dec 14, 2017 4:12 PM, "ryan goodman elboy0712@... [Q-LIST]" <Q-LIST@...> wrote:

 

 Sorry Jay, but that was not what I saw as an apples to apples comparison and here is why. I’m happy to be wrong here, but this is where I was coming from.

Approach speed in a 152 is 55kts(63mph). Jim is correct that I have not flown my Q yet, but my understanding is most come in in the area of 70 for final approach(Though the book says 85 which definitely kills my original comparison). It's also my understanding(correct me if I'm wrong)  that you don't want to stall a q down onto the runway like you can with a Cessna, that you must fly it all the way down to avoid bucking. So, assuming you're flying them both all the way down, those stall numbers are not an accurate comparison, and the final approach numbers should be applied.. That is my logic for the 7mph difference i mentioned and my reason for the comparison on approach speeds.  I wont for a second suggest  that a similar speed= similar skill required to land it. I’m aware that there is a reason it is highly advised that folks get some real dual time with an experienced pilot in a q before forging out alone.

Matt, let me finish that formula for you. You know “Science 101” K.E. = 1/2 m vand I will do so with Jays numbers just to keep this on you guys side of the argument.


Cessna 152
Stall Speed Landing Configuration    43 Knots (22m/s)
Wing Area 160 sq. ft.
Gross weight 1670 lb. (757kg)
Wing Loading (gross)    10.43 lbs./sq. ft.
Power Loading    15.2 lbs./hp

Q-200
Stall Speed Landing Configuration    63 Knots (32m/s)
Wing Area 67 sq. ft.
Gross weight 1200 lb. (544kg)
Wing Loading (gross)    17.9 lbs./sq. ft.
Power Loading    12 lbs./hp

 

.5(757) x (22)2 = 183194 kg-m2/s2

.5(544)x(32)= 131648 kg-m2/s2

Approach speed in a 152 is 55kts(63mph). Jim is correct that I have not flown my Q yet, but my understanding is most come in on the area of 70 for final approach. It's also my understanding(correct me if I'm wrong)  that you don't want to stall a q down onto the runway like you can with a Cessna, that you must fly out all the way down. So, assuming you're flying them both all the way down, those stall numbers are not an accurate comparison, and the final approach numbers should be applied. 

 

On Thu, Dec 14, 2017 at 11:54 AM, jay@... [Q-LIST]

<Q-LIST@...> wrote:

 

Here are the relevant data:

Cessna 152
Stall Speed Landing Configuration    43 Knots
Wing Area 160 sq. ft.
Gross weight 1670 lb.
Wing Loading (gross)    10..43 lbs./sq. ft.
P


Re: BRS Chute in a Q2

Jerry Marstall <jnmarstall@...>
 

With AOA I can fly final at 80MPH. However final is with power.



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


-------- Original message --------
From: "logistics_engineering@... [Q-LIST]" <Q-LIST@...>
Date: 12/15/17 11:36 AM (GMT-05:00)
To: Q-LIST@...
Subject: Re: [Q-LIST] BRS Chute in a Q2

 

My approach and landing inumbers are the same as Paul’s.

Jim Patillo
N46JP Q200
1450 hours on my Q


Re: BRS Chute in a Q2

Jim Patillo
 

My approach and landing inumbers are the same as Paul’s.

Jim Patillo
N46JP Q200
1450 hours on my Q


Re: B(R)S

JMasal@...
 

Yet another perspective. ("if you can't say something nice, don'say anything at all") we would all live in a VERY silent world if
this were true.
In the military and aircraft manufacturing world you can crunch all the numbers you want but there are always such things as
TEST PILOTS with high, verifiable skills who risk life and limb to confirm or deny engineering numbers. We have never had that
just guys who fly non-precision built aircraft with variable flight skills.



-------- Original message --------
From: "Paul Fisher rv7a.n18pf@... [Q-LIST]" LIST@...>
Date: 12/14/17 5:38 PM (GMT-05:00)
 
I'm trying to stay out of this ("if you can't say something nice, don't say anything at all"), but I will provide some real world numbers.  I've been flying my Q-200 taildragger for 27 years and have about 1,650 hours on it, so I think I can speak authoritatively about my particular airplane.

,_.___

Posted by: Jerry Marstall <jnmarstall@...>
Reply via web post Reply to sender Reply to group Start a New Topic Messages in this topic (33)

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Quickie Builders Association WEB site
http://www.quickiebuilders.org


.


Re: BRS Chute in a Q2

Jerry Marstall <jnmarstall@...>
 

Another perspective. Would anybody send a non pilot on a solo in a q 200 with only 10 hours of instruction? 



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


-------- Original message --------
From: "Paul Fisher rv7a.n18pf@... [Q-LIST]" <Q-LIST@...>
Date: 12/14/17 5:38 PM (GMT-05:00)
To: Q-LIST@...
Subject: Re: [Q-LIST] BRS Chute in a Q2

 

I'm trying to stay out of this ("if you can't say something nice, don't say anything at all"), but I will provide some real world numbers.  I've been flying my Q-200 taildragger for 27 years and have about 1,650 hours on it, so I think I can speak authoritatively about my particular airplane.

In a typical pattern I slow down to 120mph on downwind.  Abeam the numbers I slow to 100mph.  On short final I slow to 90mph.  My plane stops flying at 80mph, so I always touchdown at or above that number.

I have flown 152s.  I can't quote the speeds, but I know things happen considerably faster in my Q-200.  In my opinion anyone who thinks they are about the same has clearly never flown a Q-200 and is doing the community a disservice by implying they are.  Just my opinion.

Paul Fisher
Q-200 N17PF

On Dec 14, 2017 4:12 PM, "ryan goodman elboy0712@... [Q-LIST]" <Q-LIST@...> wrote:
 

 Sorry Jay, but that was not what I saw as an apples to apples comparison and here is why. I’m happy to be wrong here, but this is where I was coming from.

Approach speed in a 152 is 55kts(63mph). Jim is correct that I have not flown my Q yet, but my understanding is most come in in the area of 70 for final approach(Though the book says 85 which definitely kills my original comparison). It's also my understanding(correct me if I'm wrong)  that you don't want to stall a q down onto the runway like you can with a Cessna, that you must fly it all the way down to avoid bucking. So, assuming you're flying them both all the way down, those stall numbers are not an accurate comparison, and the final approach numbers should be applied.. That is my logic for the 7mph difference i mentioned and my reason for the comparison on approach speeds.  I wont for a second suggest  that a similar speed= similar skill required to land it. I’m aware that there is a reason it is highly advised that folks get some real dual time with an experienced pilot in a q before forging out alone.

Matt, let me finish that formula for you. You know “Science 101” K.E. = 1/2 m vand I will do so with Jays numbers just to keep this on you guys side of the argument.


Cessna 152
Stall Speed Landing Configuration    43 Knots (22m/s)
Wing Area 160 sq. ft.
Gross weight 1670 lb. (757kg)
Wing Loading (gross)    10.43 lbs./sq. ft.
Power Loading    15.2 lbs./hp

Q-200
Stall Speed Landing Configuration    63 Knots (32m/s)
Wing Area 67 sq. ft.
Gross weight 1200 lb. (544kg)
Wing Loading (gross)    17.9 lbs./sq. ft.
Power Loading    12 lbs./hp

 

.5(757) x (22)2 = 183194 kg-m2/s2

.5(544)x(32)= 131648 kg-m2/s2

Approach speed in a 152 is 55kts(63mph). Jim is correct that I have not flown my Q yet, but my understanding is most come in on the area of 70 for final approach. It's also my understanding(correct me if I'm wrong)  that you don't want to stall a q down onto the runway like you can with a Cessna, that you must fly out all the way down. So, assuming you're flying them both all the way down, those stall numbers are not an accurate comparison, and the final approach numbers should be applied. 


On Thu, Dec 14, 2017 at 11:54 AM, jay@... [Q-LIST]
<Q-LIST@...> wrote:
 

Here are the relevant data:

Cessna 152
Stall Speed Landing Configuration    43 Knots
Wing Area 160 sq. ft.
Gross weight 1670 lb.
Wing Loading (gross)    10..43 lbs./sq. ft.
P


Re: BRS Chute in a Q2

Allan Farr
 

Hi. I didn't know about that - love Comanches (my dad had a 180 Comanche)


Re: Finger Brakes

Phil Lankford
 

Finger brakes fit nicely onto the center console and thereby may be used from either seat

Phil


On Dec 14, 2017, at 3:31 PM, mskiby@... [Q-LIST] <Q-LIST@...> wrote:

 

What are the master cylinders used for the differential finger brakes?  Also can I tie them into toe brakes to give the passenger access to brakes in an emergency?  Thanks for any help here.

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