Date   

Re: Important Items for a Long Cross Country

Allan Farr
 

"Piece of mine" - clever/funny;)


Re: Important Items for a Long Cross Country

Jerry Marstall <jnmarstall@...>
 

Nose tire tube for sure on tri-gear. I carry both main and nose tubes



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


-------- Original message --------
From: "Phil Lankford britmcman@... [Q-LIST]" <Q-LIST@...>
Date: 12/20/17 5:40 PM (GMT-05:00)
To: Q-LIST@...
Subject: Re: [Q-LIST] Re: Important Items for a Long Cross Country

 

Consider carrying along tire inflation and tire repair items. 


Phil


On Dec 20, 2017, at 9:08 AM, jay@... [Q-LIST] <Q-LIST@...> wrote:

 

Hi Matthew,

Your job sounds great. I am glad you landed that.

As far as what to carry, I have a suggestion. I have a good friend who is a pilot of just about anything that flies. He does a corporate pilot job in a biz jet a couple times a month. He carries a "burn bag" fireproof thermal bag for the possibility that one of his ipad, iphone, etc. etc. batteries decides to melt down. He says he would just throw the device in there and seal it up. Would reduce a frightening cockpit emergency to a minor incident.

With all of the lithium powered devices we all carry now, it seems like a good idea. There is no way to put out a fire on those devices once the batteries start to burn.

I suggest you take Bruce's invitation to go to Enid. This time of year, the southern route is the only sure way to go. I have prepared a flight log for you from Enid, the first leg is 2 hours, with no other leg longer than 1.5 hours assuming a true groundspeed of 140 kts. In this route flies directly over many other suitable airports for your quickie. If you can go to 10500 feet MSL, you will have about 2000' of clearance over the highest points along the route and never be out of radio range for flight following. The route goes as follows:

Enid OK
Dahlhart, TX
Moriarity, NM (east of Albuquerque)
Grants, NM
Winslow, AZ
Prescott, AZ
Bullfrog/Lake Havasu AZ
Twentynine Palms, CA
..then over Palmdale and into Mojave

I have flown into most of these airports, only never having visited Enid and Twentynine Palms. All the others have long good quality runways and daylight attended fuel.

Wishing you clear skies and smooth flying! 

Oh, one other thing: remember to watch your airspeed carefully on final, as you land at higher and higher field elevations. It is easy to get fooled because your groundspeed is significantly higher for the same airspeed so your visual ques are different than you are used to at lower field elevations. At the higher altitude fields you will think you are coming in too fast, but you are not. Believe your airspeed.

Cheers,
Jay Scheevel, Tri-Q, stilll building

<Q200_navlog.pdf>


Re: Important Items for a Long Cross Country

Paul Fisher
 

Great idea Phil.  Since the Q tires are an odd size (most airports wouldn't have any in stock), I always carry a spare tube and tire with me.  Others have already mentioned the other things I carry - survival gear, tools, oil, canopy cover, etc.

Be safe and have a great trip!

Paul Fisher

On Dec 20, 2017 4:40 PM, "Phil Lankford britmcman@... [Q-LIST]" <Q-LIST@...> wrote:
 

Consider carrying along tire inflation and tire repair items. 


Phil


On Dec 20, 2017, at 9:08 AM, jay@... [Q-LIST] <Q-LIST@...> wrote:

 

Hi Matthew,

Your job sounds great. I am glad you landed that.

As far as what to carry, I have a suggestion. I have a good friend who is a pilot of just about anything that flies. He does a corporate pilot job in a biz jet a couple times a month. He carries a "burn bag" fireproof thermal bag for the possibility that one of his ipad, iphone, etc. etc. batteries decides to melt down. He says he would just throw the device in there and seal it up. Would reduce a frightening cockpit emergency to a minor incident.

With all of the lithium powered devices we all carry now, it seems like a good idea. There is no way to put out a fire on those devices once the batteries start to burn.

I suggest you take Bruce's invitation to go to Enid. This time of year, the southern route is the only sure way to go. I have prepared a flight log for you from Enid, the first leg is 2 hours, with no other leg longer than 1.5 hours assuming a true groundspeed of 140 kts. In this route flies directly over many other suitable airports for your quickie. If you can go to 10500 feet MSL, you will have about 2000' of clearance over the highest points along the route and never be out of radio range for flight following. The route goes as follows:

Enid OK
Dahlhart, TX
Moriarity, NM (east of Albuquerque)
Grants, NM
Winslow, AZ
Prescott, AZ
Bullfrog/Lake Havasu AZ
Twentynine Palms, CA
..then over Palmdale and into Mojave

I have flown into most of these airports, only never having visited Enid and Twentynine Palms. All the others have long good quality runways and daylight attended fuel.

Wishing you clear skies and smooth flying! 

Oh, one other thing: remember to watch your airspeed carefully on final, as you land at higher and higher field elevations. It is easy to get fooled because your groundspeed is significantly higher for the same airspeed so your visual ques are different than you are used to at lower field elevations. At the higher altitude fields you will think you are coming in too fast, but you are not. Believe your airspeed.

Cheers,
Jay Scheevel, Tri-Q, stilll building


Re: Important Items for a Long Cross Country

Sam Hoskins
 

Good point, Phil. I do carry a spare tube in my kit. I've had to use it a couple of times over the years.

Sam


On Wed, Dec 20, 2017 at 4:40 PM Phil Lankford britmcman@... [Q-LIST] <Q-LIST@...> wrote:
 

Consider carrying along tire inflation and tire repair items. 


Phil


On Dec 20, 2017, at 9:08 AM, jay@... [Q-LIST] <Q-LIST@...> wrote:

 

Hi Matthew,

Your job sounds great. I am glad you landed that.

As far as what to carry, I have a suggestion. I have a good friend who is a pilot of just about anything that flies. He does a corporate pilot job in a biz jet a couple times a month. He carries a "burn bag" fireproof thermal bag for the possibility that one of his ipad, iphone, etc. etc. batteries decides to melt down. He says he would just throw the device in there and seal it up. Would reduce a frightening cockpit emergency to a minor incident.

With all of the lithium powered devices we all carry now, it seems like a good idea. There is no way to put out a fire on those devices once the batteries start to burn.

I suggest you take Bruce's invitation to go to Enid. This time of year, the southern route is the only sure way to go. I have prepared a flight log for you from Enid, the first leg is 2 hours, with no other leg longer than 1.5 hours assuming a true groundspeed of 140 kts. In this route flies directly over many other suitable airports for your quickie. If you can go to 10500 feet MSL, you will have about 2000' of clearance over the highest points along the route and never be out of radio range for flight following. The route goes as follows:

Enid OK
Dahlhart, TX
Moriarity, NM (east of Albuquerque)
Grants, NM
Winslow, AZ
Prescott, AZ
Bullfrog/Lake Havasu AZ
Twentynine Palms, CA
..then over Palmdale and into Mojave

I have flown into most of these airports, only never having visited Enid and Twentynine Palms. All the others have long good quality runways and daylight attended fuel.

Wishing you clear skies and smooth flying! 

Oh, one other thing: remember to watch your airspeed carefully on final, as you land at higher and higher field elevations. It is easy to get fooled because your groundspeed is significantly higher for the same airspeed so your visual ques are different than you are used to at lower field elevations. At the higher altitude fields you will think you are coming in too fast, but you are not. Believe your airspeed.

Cheers,
Jay Scheevel, Tri-Q, stilll building


Re: Important Items for a Long Cross Country

britmcman99
 

I am based in El Cajon, CA Gillespie Field (KSEE). Nice stopover if you need to and also consider Ramona (KRNM). 


On Dec 20, 2017, at 11:18 AM, Matthew Curcio mlcurcio89@... [Q-LIST] <Q-LIST@...> wrote:

 

Oh yeah and thanks for the reminder on airspeeds. That’s something I’ll have to keep telling myself. I’m actually going to most likely fly to imperial county airport in California to spend the new year with some friends at the glamis sand dunes and then up to Mojave (tehachapi actually). I think your route should be pretty close to that anyways and but I won’t have time to check until later today or tomorrow. I think going there will be good as it gives me a good reason to steer well clear of all the big mountains.


Thanks,

Matthew Curcio
419-290-3773


On Dec 20, 2017, at 9:52 AM, 'Jay Scheevel SGT' jay@... [Q-LIST] <Q-LIST@...> wrote:

 

Hi Matthew,

 

Your job sounds great. I am glad you landed that.

 

As far as what to carry, I have a suggestion. I have a good friend who is a pilot of just about anything that flies. He does a corporate pilot job in a biz jet a couple times a month. He carries a "burn bag" fireproof thermal bag for the possibility that one of his ipad, iphone, etc. etc. batteries decides to melt down. He says he would just throw the device in there and seal it up. Would reduce a frightening cockpit emergency to a minor incident.

 

With all of the lithium powered devices we all carry now, it seems like a good idea. There is no way to put out a fire on those devices once the batteries start to burn.

 

I suggest you take Bruce's invitation to go to Enid. This time of year, the southern route is the only sure way to go. I have prepared a flight log for you from Enid, the first leg is 2 hours, with no other leg longer than 1.5 hours assuming a true groundspeed of 140 kts. In this route flies directly over many other suitable airports for your quickie. If you can go to 10500 feet MSL, you will have about 2000' of clearance over the highest points along the route and never be out of radio range for flight following. The route goes as follows:

 

Enid OK

Dahlhart, TX

Moriarity, NM (east of Albuquerque)

Grants, NM

Winslow, AZ

Prescott, AZ

Bullfrog/Lake Havasu AZ

Twentynine Palms, CA

..then over Palmdale and into Mojave

 

I have flown into most of these airports, only never having visited Enid and Twentynine Palms. All the others have long good quality runways and daylight attended fuel.

 

Wishing you clear skies and smooth flying!

 

Oh, one other thing: remember to watch your airspeed carefully on final, as you land at higher and higher field elevations. It is easy to get fooled because your groundspeed is significantly higher for the same airspeed so your visual ques are different than you are used to at lower field elevations. At the higher altitude fields you will think you are coming in too fast, but you are not. Believe your airspeed.

 

Cheers,

Jay Scheevel, Tri-Q, stilll building


Re: Important Items for a Long Cross Country

britmcman99
 

Consider carrying along tire inflation and tire repair items. 

Phil


On Dec 20, 2017, at 9:08 AM, jay@... [Q-LIST] <Q-LIST@...> wrote:

 

Hi Matthew,

Your job sounds great. I am glad you landed that.

As far as what to carry, I have a suggestion. I have a good friend who is a pilot of just about anything that flies. He does a corporate pilot job in a biz jet a couple times a month. He carries a "burn bag" fireproof thermal bag for the possibility that one of his ipad, iphone, etc. etc. batteries decides to melt down. He says he would just throw the device in there and seal it up. Would reduce a frightening cockpit emergency to a minor incident.

With all of the lithium powered devices we all carry now, it seems like a good idea. There is no way to put out a fire on those devices once the batteries start to burn.

I suggest you take Bruce's invitation to go to Enid. This time of year, the southern route is the only sure way to go. I have prepared a flight log for you from Enid, the first leg is 2 hours, with no other leg longer than 1.5 hours assuming a true groundspeed of 140 kts. In this route flies directly over many other suitable airports for your quickie. If you can go to 10500 feet MSL, you will have about 2000' of clearance over the highest points along the route and never be out of radio range for flight following. The route goes as follows:

Enid OK
Dahlhart, TX
Moriarity, NM (east of Albuquerque)
Grants, NM
Winslow, AZ
Prescott, AZ
Bullfrog/Lake Havasu AZ
Twentynine Palms, CA
..then over Palmdale and into Mojave

I have flown into most of these airports, only never having visited Enid and Twentynine Palms. All the others have long good quality runways and daylight attended fuel.

Wishing you clear skies and smooth flying! 

Oh, one other thing: remember to watch your airspeed carefully on final, as you land at higher and higher field elevations. It is easy to get fooled because your groundspeed is significantly higher for the same airspeed so your visual ques are different than you are used to at lower field elevations. At the higher altitude fields you will think you are coming in too fast, but you are not. Believe your airspeed.

Cheers,
Jay Scheevel, Tri-Q, stilll building


Re: Important Items for a Long Cross Country

Matthew Curcio
 

Oh yeah and thanks for the reminder on airspeeds. That’s something I’ll have to keep telling myself. I’m actually going to most likely fly to imperial county airport in California to spend the new year with some friends at the glamis sand dunes and then up to Mojave (tehachapi actually). I think your route should be pretty close to that anyways and but I won’t have time to check until later today or tomorrow. I think going there will be good as it gives me a good reason to steer well clear of all the big mountains.

Thanks,

Matthew Curcio
419-290-3773


On Dec 20, 2017, at 9:52 AM, 'Jay Scheevel SGT' jay@... [Q-LIST] <Q-LIST@...> wrote:

 

Hi Matthew,

 

Your job sounds great. I am glad you landed that.

 

As far as what to carry, I have a suggestion. I have a good friend who is a pilot of just about anything that flies. He does a corporate pilot job in a biz jet a couple times a month. He carries a "burn bag" fireproof thermal bag for the possibility that one of his ipad, iphone, etc. etc. batteries decides to melt down. He says he would just throw the device in there and seal it up. Would reduce a frightening cockpit emergency to a minor incident.

 

With all of the lithium powered devices we all carry now, it seems like a good idea. There is no way to put out a fire on those devices once the batteries start to burn.

 

I suggest you take Bruce's invitation to go to Enid. This time of year, the southern route is the only sure way to go. I have prepared a flight log for you from Enid, the first leg is 2 hours, with no other leg longer than 1.5 hours assuming a true groundspeed of 140 kts. In this route flies directly over many other suitable airports for your quickie. If you can go to 10500 feet MSL, you will have about 2000' of clearance over the highest points along the route and never be out of radio range for flight following. The route goes as follows:

 

Enid OK

Dahlhart, TX

Moriarity, NM (east of Albuquerque)

Grants, NM

Winslow, AZ

Prescott, AZ

Bullfrog/Lake Havasu AZ

Twentynine Palms, CA

..then over Palmdale and into Mojave

 

I have flown into most of these airports, only never having visited Enid and Twentynine Palms. All the others have long good quality runways and daylight attended fuel.

 

Wishing you clear skies and smooth flying!

 

Oh, one other thing: remember to watch your airspeed carefully on final, as you land at higher and higher field elevations. It is easy to get fooled because your groundspeed is significantly higher for the same airspeed so your visual ques are different than you are used to at lower field elevations. At the higher altitude fields you will think you are coming in too fast, but you are not. Believe your airspeed.

 

Cheers,

Jay Scheevel, Tri-Q, stilll building

<Q200_navlog.pdf>


Re: Important Items for a Long Cross Country

Matthew Curcio
 

Thanks! For the suggestions, I like the idea of the battery bag. That is a very good consideration especially with the gas tank being such close proximity to where you might toss something on the passenger seat. 

Matthew Curcio
419-290-3773


On Dec 20, 2017, at 9:52 AM, 'Jay Scheevel SGT' jay@... [Q-LIST] <Q-LIST@...> wrote:

 

Hi Matthew,

 

Your job sounds great. I am glad you landed that.

 

As far as what to carry, I have a suggestion. I have a good friend who is a pilot of just about anything that flies. He does a corporate pilot job in a biz jet a couple times a month. He carries a "burn bag" fireproof thermal bag for the possibility that one of his ipad, iphone, etc. etc. batteries decides to melt down. He says he would just throw the device in there and seal it up. Would reduce a frightening cockpit emergency to a minor incident.

 

With all of the lithium powered devices we all carry now, it seems like a good idea. There is no way to put out a fire on those devices once the batteries start to burn.

 

I suggest you take Bruce's invitation to go to Enid. This time of year, the southern route is the only sure way to go. I have prepared a flight log for you from Enid, the first leg is 2 hours, with no other leg longer than 1.5 hours assuming a true groundspeed of 140 kts. In this route flies directly over many other suitable airports for your quickie. If you can go to 10500 feet MSL, you will have about 2000' of clearance over the highest points along the route and never be out of radio range for flight following. The route goes as follows:

 

Enid OK

Dahlhart, TX

Moriarity, NM (east of Albuquerque)

Grants, NM

Winslow, AZ

Prescott, AZ

Bullfrog/Lake Havasu AZ

Twentynine Palms, CA

..then over Palmdale and into Mojave

 

I have flown into most of these airports, only never having visited Enid and Twentynine Palms. All the others have long good quality runways and daylight attended fuel.

 

Wishing you clear skies and smooth flying!

 

Oh, one other thing: remember to watch your airspeed carefully on final, as you land at higher and higher field elevations. It is easy to get fooled because your groundspeed is significantly higher for the same airspeed so your visual ques are different than you are used to at lower field elevations. At the higher altitude fields you will think you are coming in too fast, but you are not. Believe your airspeed.

 

Cheers,

Jay Scheevel, Tri-Q, stilll building

<Q200_navlog.pdf>


Re: Important Items for a Long Cross Country

Jay Scheevel
 

Hi Matthew,

 

Your job sounds great. I am glad you landed that.

 

As far as what to carry, I have a suggestion. I have a good friend who is a pilot of just about anything that flies. He does a corporate pilot job in a biz jet a couple times a month. He carries a "burn bag" fireproof thermal bag for the possibility that one of his ipad, iphone, etc. etc. batteries decides to melt down. He says he would just throw the device in there and seal it up. Would reduce a frightening cockpit emergency to a minor incident.

 

With all of the lithium powered devices we all carry now, it seems like a good idea. There is no way to put out a fire on those devices once the batteries start to burn.

 

I suggest you take Bruce's invitation to go to Enid. This time of year, the southern route is the only sure way to go. I have prepared a flight log for you from Enid, the first leg is 2 hours, with no other leg longer than 1.5 hours assuming a true groundspeed of 140 kts. In this route flies directly over many other suitable airports for your quickie. If you can go to 10500 feet MSL, you will have about 2000' of clearance over the highest points along the route and never be out of radio range for flight following. The route goes as follows:

 

Enid OK

Dahlhart, TX

Moriarity, NM (east of Albuquerque)

Grants, NM

Winslow, AZ

Prescott, AZ

Bullfrog/Lake Havasu AZ

Twentynine Palms, CA

..then over Palmdale and into Mojave

 

I have flown into most of these airports, only never having visited Enid and Twentynine Palms. All the others have long good quality runways and daylight attended fuel.

 

Wishing you clear skies and smooth flying!

 

Oh, one other thing: remember to watch your airspeed carefully on final, as you land at higher and higher field elevations. It is easy to get fooled because your groundspeed is significantly higher for the same airspeed so your visual ques are different than you are used to at lower field elevations. At the higher altitude fields you will think you are coming in too fast, but you are not. Believe your airspeed.

 

Cheers,

Jay Scheevel, Tri-Q, stilll building


Re: Important Items for a Long Cross Country

Jay Scheevel
 

Hi Matthew,

Your job sounds great. I am glad you landed that.

As far as what to carry, I have a suggestion. I have a good friend who is a pilot of just about anything that flies. He does a corporate pilot job in a biz jet a couple times a month. He carries a "burn bag" fireproof thermal bag for the possibility that one of his ipad, iphone, etc. etc. batteries decides to melt down. He says he would just throw the device in there and seal it up. Would reduce a frightening cockpit emergency to a minor incident.

With all of the lithium powered devices we all carry now, it seems like a good idea. There is no way to put out a fire on those devices once the batteries start to burn.

I suggest you take Bruce's invitation to go to Enid. This time of year, the southern route is the only sure way to go. I have prepared a flight log for you from Enid, the first leg is 2 hours, with no other leg longer than 1.5 hours assuming a true groundspeed of 140 kts. In this route flies directly over many other suitable airports for your quickie. If you can go to 10500 feet MSL, you will have about 2000' of clearance over the highest points along the route and never be out of radio range for flight following. The route goes as follows:

Enid OK
Dahlhart, TX
Moriarity, NM (east of Albuquerque)
Grants, NM
Winslow, AZ
Prescott, AZ
Bullfrog/Lake Havasu AZ
Twentynine Palms, CA
..then over Palmdale and into Mojave

I have flown into most of these airports, only never having visited Enid and Twentynine Palms. All the others have long good quality runways and daylight attended fuel.

Wishing you clear skies and smooth flying! 

Oh, one other thing: remember to watch your airspeed carefully on final, as you land at higher and higher field elevations. It is easy to get fooled because your groundspeed is significantly higher for the same airspeed so your visual ques are different than you are used to at lower field elevations. At the higher altitude fields you will think you are coming in too fast, but you are not. Believe your airspeed.

Cheers,
Jay Scheevel, Tri-Q, stilll building


Re: Important Items for a Long Cross Country

Jay Scheevel
 

Hi Matthew,

Your job sounds great. I am glad you landed that.

As far as what to carry, I have a suggestion. I have a good friend who is a pilot of just about anything that flies. He does a corporate pilot job in a biz jet a couple times a month. He carries a "burn bag" fireproof thermal bag for the possibility that one of his ipad, iphone, etc. etc. batteries decides to melt down. He says he would just throw the device in there and seal it up. Would reduce a frightening cockpit emergency to a minor incident.

With all of the lithium powered devices we all carry now, it seems like a good idea. There is no way to put out a fire on those devices once the batteries start to burn.

I suggest you take Bruce's invitation to go to Enid. This time of year, the southern route is the only sure way to go. I have prepared a flight log for you from Enid, the first leg is 2 hours, with no other leg longer than 1.5 hours assuming a true groundspeed of 140 kts. In this route flies directly over many other suitable airports for your quickie. If you can go to 10500 feet MSL, you will have about 2000' of clearance over the highest points along the route and never be out of radio range for flight following. The route goes as follows:

Enid OK
Dahlhart, TX
Moriarity, NM (east of Albuquerque)
Grants, NM
Winslow, AZ
Prescott, AZ
Bullfrog/Lake Havasu AZ
Twentynine Palms, CA
..then over Palmdale and into Mojave

I have flown into most of these airports, only never having visited Enid and Twentynine Palms. All the others have long good quality runways and daylight attended fuel.

Wishing you clear skies and smooth flying! 

Oh, one other thing: remember to watch your airspeed carefully on final, as you land at higher and higher field elevations. It is easy to get fooled because your groundspeed is significantly higher for the same airspeed so your visual ques are different than you are used to at lower field elevations. At the higher altitude fields you will think you are coming in too fast, but you are not. Believe your airspeed.

Cheers,
Jay Scheevel, Tri-Q, stilll building


Re: Important Items for a Long Cross Country

Jay Scheevel
 

Hi Matthew,

Your job sounds great. I am glad you landed that.

As far as what to carry, I have a suggestion. I have a good friend who is a pilot of just about anything that flies. He does a corporate pilot job in a biz jet a couple times a month. He carries a "burn bag" fireproof thermal bag for the possibility that one of his ipad, iphone, etc. etc. batteries decides to melt down. He says he would just throw the device in there and seal it up. Would reduce a frightening cockpit emergency to a minor incident.

With all of the lithium powered devices we all carry now, it seems like a good idea. There is no way to put out a fire on those devices once the batteries start to burn.

I suggest you take Bruce's invitation to go to Enid. This time of year, the southern route is the only sure way to go. I have prepared a flight log for you from Enid, the first leg is 2 hours, with no other leg longer than 1.5 hours assuming a true groundspeed of 140 kts. In this route flies directly over many other suitable airports for your quickie. If you can go to 10500 feet MSL, you will have about 2000' of clearance over the highest points along the route and never be out of radio range for flight following. The route goes as follows:

Enid OK
Dahlhart, TX
Moriarity, NM (east of Albuquerque)
Grants, NM
Winslow, AZ
Prescott, AZ
Bullfrog/Lake Havasu AZ
Twentynine Palms, CA
..then over Palmdale and into Mojave

I have flown into most of these airports, only never having visited Enid and Twentynine Palms. All the others have long good quality runways and daylight attended fuel.

Wishing you clear skies and smooth flying! 

Oh, one other thing: remember to watch your airspeed carefully on final, as you land at higher and higher field elevations. It is easy to get fooled because your groundspeed is significantly higher for the same airspeed so your visual ques are different than you are used to at lower field elevations. At the higher altitude fields you will think you are coming in too fast, but you are not. Believe your airspeed.

Cheers,
Jay Scheevel, Tri-Q, stilll building


Re: Important Items for a Long Cross Country

Jim Patillo
 

Correction: “pumps directly from AUX tank to Header tank”

Jim

N46JP Q200


Re: Important Items for a Long Cross Country

Jim Patillo
 

Correction: “pumps gas directly from AUX tank to Header tank”

Jim
N46JP Q200


Re: Important Items for a Long Cross Country

Bruce Crain
 


Re: Important Items for a Long Cross Country

Jim Patillo
 

Mathew I made a 6.8 gal Fiberglas AUX tank with fuel resistant quick disconnects and used a small on demand motor home fuel pump which pumps directly to the engine and internal baffles to prevent tank sloshing. This gives me a total of 27.1 gal.

I burn AUX off first. Pictures in files above. I’ve been across the country several times and it gives a lot of piece of mine. Tank is molded to lock in just aft of the pax bulkhead. Works great and tank weighs nothing. Can be installed and removed in 10 minutes.

Just a thought.

Jim
N46JP Q200


Re: Sold as parts

Larry Severson
 

Thank you.

 

 

From: Q-LIST@... [mailto:Q-LIST@...]
Sent: Tuesday, December 19, 2017 4:37 PM
To: Q-LIST@...
Subject: Re: [Q-LIST] Sold as parts

 

 

As I understand the regs, if the AW certificate was sent to FAA for any reason, decommissioned, wrecked, did not want the liability when done flying, etc,

the FAA will NOT issue another certificate, as they know exactly where the certificate is. It’s not lost or stolen or misplaced, it’s in OK City. That plane will not get a certificate again without lying to the FAA. They frown on such things.

 

I believe this to be true, but would deny it under oath!

 

  

Kevin Boddicker
TriQ 200 N7868B  445 hrs
Luana, IA.





On Dec 19, 2017, at 3:13 PM, Paul Fisher rv7a.n18pf@... [Q-LIST] <Q-LIST@...> wrote:

 

 

I'm no expert either, but my understanding is you have to show the AIRCRAFT was >50% built by amateurs in order to get a valid airworthiness certificate.  You have to show that YOU personally built more than 50% to get the repairman's certificate allowing you to sign off on annual condition inspections.  So it should be possible to show that the aircraft is eligible for an airworthiness certificate even if you didn't do the work.

 

Of course different FSDO offices may have different opinions, so you should check locally to see what they say.

 

All of this is for US residents.  I have no idea what the rules are in other parts of the world!!

 

Paul Fisher

Q-200 N17PF

 

On Dec 19, 2017 3:02 PM, "Norm Parmley norm_parm@... [Q-LIST]" <Q-LIST@...> wrote:

 

 

Yes, there are paths to flying that bird again. The rules say 51% if you are building. If you are using pieces of another project, and building a new project you have to build 51% of the "new" aircraft. If you are rebuilding a current project, and keeping the "N" number it will be hard to show you have built 51%.

I am no super authority on the subject. However, if you want to discuss with me, pleas call: 252-671-1567

 

Rgards,

Norm parmley

 

 

On Tuesday, December 19, 2017, 2:40:52 PM EST, 'larry severson' larry2@... [Q-LIST] <Q-LIST@...> wrote:

 

 

 

 

I see a few sales of Q2s as parts. Is there any way to put that plane in the air legally?

 

 

 

 

 


Re: Important Items for a Long Cross Country

Matthew Curcio
 

Thanks Sam - Duct tape will most definitely make it in my tool kit. My header tank is 5 gallons - I measured it. Over the summer I tested flows at take off angles and noted that while flow was drastically reduced as header level goes down it did still meat max requirements for the O-200. That said I have not tested this and I am leary of a go around scenario with the header tank level below full that is what is driving my 2 hour limitation. I am pretty nervous about running into airports with weird fuel availability (ive even ran into that in my amphib around ohio) - I'm going to ask around / call ahead prior to departure. I'm planning on staying on flight following as much as possible, unfortunately I don't have the transponder installion completed yet or certified which will make that a bit of a PITA. I'm going to advise departure, intended destination, and fuel on board with some friends / family as a secondary.


New job is fantastic. Working at Scaled Composites is every bit as dreamy as you might imagine. You're just surrounded by incredibly smart, hands on engineers who are basically all pilots and homebuilders as well. Its the closest thing to living at Air Venture you can get I would say. I'm working on the Stratolaunch airplane, which completed its first taxi test as of yesterday. Pretty cool to watch it out moving around and an added bonus is the big empty hangar while she was out means lots of space for us to fly RC airplanes around inside. Thanks for the advice and thanks for asking!



Matthew Curcio

419.290.3773




From: Q-LIST@... on behalf of Sam Hoskins sam.hoskins@... [Q-LIST]
Sent: Tuesday, December 19, 2017 11:14 AM
To: Q-LIST@...
Subject: Re: [Q-LIST] Important Items for a Long Cross Country
 
 

Mathew,

I don't know the size of your header tank, but I fly until the main(s) are about empty, then I have the whole header in reserve.  In the cockpit, I use duct tape, water and a relief jug, pretty much in that order.

Out west, fuel stops are farther apart and sometimes the airports are unattended.  If you find yourself needing fuel and pick an airport off the chart, I suggest calling their Unicom 50 miles out or so to make sure fuel is available.  One place we stopped in Texas, you had to call the local sheriff's office and they sent an officer out to unlock the pump.

Flight following is very good to use and someone knows where you are most of the time. The other guy's suggestions are right on also.

How is the new job going?

Sam

On Tue, Dec 19, 2017 at 8:33 AM Matthew Curcio mlcurcio89@... [Q-LIST] <Q-LIST@...> wrote:
 

I'm getting ready to make a literal cross country to bring my Q200 out here to Mojave from my previous home airport in Ohio. I'm planning for <2 hour ~300 mile legs and I'm going to go south and around the rockies. Anywho, any Q specific items or tips you all might have for a long cross country? This will be my first time in any cross country venturing more than 3 states from Ohio.


Current List:


Warm clothes and blanket

water for 2 days and a couple of MRE's

Ipad and Iphone with foreflight for NAV and LA VFR sectional

3 Charging cables( for Ipad and Iphone and spare)

Handheld radio

tie downs (can be used for hand propping if need arises)

30ah Lipo battery back - lightweight and can be used for jumpstarting, backup source for charging nav devices, and added battery reserve for fuel pump (I ditched the hand pump in lieu of a redundant electric pump) in the event of an alternator failure.




Matthew Curcio

419.290.3773


Re: Sold as parts

One Sky Dog
 

Kevin,

An FAA guy at the Salt Lake FSDO once said to our chapter "do not read any thing into the regulations that is not there".

Amateur Built is a category of aircraft that are unique. Before kits there was no 51% anything. There was and still is a thing called the primary builder, this person gets the airworthiness certificate. The actual airplane can be built by hundreds of people ( EAA One week wonder) but only registered by one. When you apply for a airworthiness certificate you have to convince the FAA or DAR that the airplane in question is amateur built. There is no requirement for you personally to build anything but you have to swear that you are the primary builder and it was not built by professionals.

In the eyes of the FAA an airplane is a pile of parts and a pile of paper that when married together has an airworthiness certificate and a registration. If the registration is returned to the FAA by cancelling or scrapping it is no longer an airplane just a pile of amateur built parts. There is nothing in the FAR's that prohibits reusing amateur parts to construct another airframe register it and apply for a new airworthiness inspection with you as the primary builder.

The repairmans certificate is another thing. You have to ask the DAR or FSDO for the form and convert nice him that you know enough about the construction to be able to perform an inspection. Usually this is determined by the inspector during the AWI. Being an A&P would qualify you.

Having said that there are plenty of FSDO people who use the 51% rule incorrectly. The rule actually was to determine if a kit resulted in an airplane that the major portion was not built by an amateur. Remember your local federal worker really does not care about you and your airplane. You are more work for him. Tell him you are the primary builder do not get into how much you built. Say the major portion was built by amateurs. When you fill out the form because you have a "kit" they want to know if professionals or amateurs built the components. Plans built is easy the form does not apply unless you had someone build your Lancair.

Kevin if you can find the FAR that prohibits reusing amateur built parts to construct another airplane I would like to read it.

Regards from sunny 60F AZ airport E 95,

One Sky Dog
Charlie Johnson
Dragonfly N187CD


On Dec 19, 2017, at 5:37 PM, Kevin Boddicker trumanst@... [Q-LIST] <Q-LIST@...> wrote:

As I understand the regs, if the AW certificate was sent to FAA for any reason, decommissioned, wrecked, did not want the liability when done flying, etc,
the FAA will NOT issue another certificate, as they know exactly where the certificate is. It’s not lost or stolen or misplaced, it’s in OK City. That plane will not get a certificate again without lying to the FAA. They frown on such things.

I believe this to be true, but would deny it under oath!

  
Kevin Boddicker
TriQ 200 N7868B  445 hrs
Luana, IA.



On Dec 19, 2017, at 3:13 PM, Paul Fisher rv7a.n18pf@... [Q-LIST] <Q-LIST@...> wrote:


I'm no expert either, but my understanding is you have to show the AIRCRAFT was >50% built by amateurs in order to get a valid airworthiness certificate.  You have to show that YOU personally built more than 50% to get the repairman's certificate allowing you to sign off on annual condition inspections.  So it should be possible to show that the aircraft is eligible for an airworthiness certificate even if you didn't do the work.

Of course different FSDO offices may have different opinions, so you should check locally to see what they say.

All of this is for US residents.  I have no idea what the rules are in other parts of the world!!

Paul Fisher
Q-200 N17PF

On Dec 19, 2017 3:02 PM, "Norm Parmley norm_parm@... [Q-LIST]" <Q-LIST@...> wrote:
 

Yes, there are paths to flying that bird again. The rules say 51% if you are building. If you are using pieces of another project, and building a new project you have to build 51% of the "new" aircraft. If you are rebuilding a current project, and keeping the "N" number it will be hard to show you have built 51%.
I am no super authority on the subject. However, if you want to discuss with me, pleas call: 252-671-1567

Rgards,
Norm parmley


On Tuesday, December 19, 2017, 2:40:52 PM EST, 'larry severson' larry2@... [Q-LIST] <Q-LIST@...> wrote:


 

I see a few sales of Q2s as parts. Is there any way to put that plane in the air legally?

 
 




Re: Sold as parts

Kevin Boddicker
 

As I understand the regs, if the AW certificate was sent to FAA for any reason, decommissioned, wrecked, did not want the liability when done flying, etc,
the FAA will NOT issue another certificate, as they know exactly where the certificate is. It’s not lost or stolen or misplaced, it’s in OK City. That plane will not get a certificate again without lying to the FAA. They frown on such things.

I believe this to be true, but would deny it under oath!

  
Kevin Boddicker
TriQ 200 N7868B  445 hrs
Luana, IA.



On Dec 19, 2017, at 3:13 PM, Paul Fisher rv7a.n18pf@... [Q-LIST] <Q-LIST@...> wrote:


I'm no expert either, but my understanding is you have to show the AIRCRAFT was >50% built by amateurs in order to get a valid airworthiness certificate.  You have to show that YOU personally built more than 50% to get the repairman's certificate allowing you to sign off on annual condition inspections.  So it should be possible to show that the aircraft is eligible for an airworthiness certificate even if you didn't do the work.

Of course different FSDO offices may have different opinions, so you should check locally to see what they say.

All of this is for US residents.  I have no idea what the rules are in other parts of the world!!

Paul Fisher
Q-200 N17PF

On Dec 19, 2017 3:02 PM, "Norm Parmley norm_parm@... [Q-LIST]" <Q-LIST@...> wrote:
 

Yes, there are paths to flying that bird again. The rules say 51% if you are building. If you are using pieces of another project, and building a new project you have to build 51% of the "new" aircraft. If you are rebuilding a current project, and keeping the "N" number it will be hard to show you have built 51%.
I am no super authority on the subject. However, if you want to discuss with me, pleas call: 252-671-1567

Rgards,
Norm parmley


On Tuesday, December 19, 2017, 2:40:52 PM EST, 'larry severson' larry2@... [Q-LIST] <Q-LIST@...> wrote:


 

I see a few sales of Q2s as parts. Is there any way to put that plane in the air legally?

 
 



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