Date   

MIL-PRF-83282 Brake Fluid

Mike Dwyer
 

Anybody know if this brake fluid is compatible with our Airhurst gocart brakes?


MIL-PRF-83282D, PERFORMANCE SPECIFICATION: HYDRAULIC FLUID, FIRE RESISTANT, SYNTHETIC HYDROCARBON BASE, NATO CODE NUMBER H-537 (30 SEP 1997) [SUPERSEDING MIL-H-83282C & MIL-H-83282C]., This specification covers the requirements for a synthetic hydrocarbon-base hydraulic fluid for use in the temperature range of -40 deg to +205 deg C. This hydraulic fluid is identified by NATO Code Number H-537.

Flash Point of 424F so this stuff is supposed to prevent brake fires if the hydraulic line snaps.

Thanks,
Mike Q200 N3QP


Re: progress

Mike Dwyer
 

Well, 121.5 mhz ELT's are no longer monitored but I kept mine in the space behind the pilots head above the main wing.  I can reach my hand in there to turn it off or on.  Your 406 EPIRB could go there.
I doubled the diameter of the original tail spring and welded a bigger attach to the tail wheel pivot.  The measly 3/8" bolt the tail wheel pivots on bends easily and if it were me, I'd go to the next size up bolt for that.
I also cracked the lower rudder hinge.  Hey, use lots of glass down there if your building a Q200 cause the plane is nose heavy anyway.
Discussion went around a few times with fire extinguishers.  I heard of one killing someone but never heard of anyone being saved by one.  I chose not to install one.
I keep a first aid kit, some tools, spare oil, in a bag in the luggage compartment.
I chose not to go with dual rudder pedals.  Now on a trip I pick the heaviest bag and toss it where the passenger rudder pedals would have gone.  In flight you don't need the pedals and on landing I sure don't want a passenger touching them.  Plus that, Rutan when asked about something that is not needed for flight said, "throw it up in the air, if it comes down you don't need it".

Mike Q200 N3QP



On Wed, Dec 20, 2017 at 8:31 PM, Dorothea Keats dkeats@... [Q-LIST] <Q-LIST@...> wrote:
   I have the  vertical stab attached along with tail spring and wheel.
Working on the longerons and canopy mount.  Have the ailerons and
elevators made with the hinge pins installed.
  Now for a question.  Where is everyone installing the ELT, fire
extinguisher and first aid kit.  Doesn't seem to be many places.
  I am also going to install dual rudder pedals. The plans say to hop in
and find a comfortable position and install them there, but does anyone
have any dimensions of the comfortable spacing? Take care------------- 
Canada Chris





Re: Important Items for a Long Cross Country

Jerry Marstall
 

Matthew should be commended for reaching out to the group seeking information on X-C flying in a Q.  Several lifesaving suggestions were offered.  

Sometimes our egos prevent us from exposing our limitations or lack of knowledge.   Matthew is obviously a confident and competent aviator.

Wishing you a great experience on your flight west.
Jerry 

On Dec 19, 2017 9:33 AM, "Matthew Curcio mlcurcio89@... [Q-LIST]" <Q-LIST@...> wrote:
 

I'm getting ready to make a literal cross country to bring my Q200 out here to Mojave from my previous home airport in Ohio. I'm planning for <2 hour ~300 mile legs and I'm going to go south and around the rockies. Anywho, any Q specific items or tips you all might have for a long cross country? This will be my first time in any cross country venturing more than 3 states from Ohio.


Current List:


Warm clothes and blanket

water for 2 days and a couple of MRE's

Ipad and Iphone with foreflight for NAV and LA VFR sectional

3 Charging cables( for Ipad and Iphone and spare)

Handheld radio

tie downs (can be used for hand propping if need arises)

30ah Lipo battery back - lightweight and can be used for jumpstarting, backup source for charging nav devices, and added battery reserve for fuel pump (I ditched the hand pump in lieu of a redundant electric pump) in the event of an alternator failure.




Matthew Curcio

419.290.3773


Re: progress

Jay Scheevel
 

Making good progess, Chris. Keep it up. No dimensions that I am aware of have been quoted, because it depends on pilot dimension. I think everyone just did as recommended in the plans. A few folks have installed adjustable systems, but I do not think that is nescessary unless you have a variety of pilots flying it.

Cheers,
Jay Scheevel, Tri-Q, still building....Santa will bring me more primer for Christmas :-)


Re: Important Items for a Long Cross Country

Jim Patillo
 

Hey Allan,

I put that little bit of sneaky verbiage in there to see if anybody was actually reading my posts. I’m not politically correct, never have been, never will be and tell it like it is. Some on this list have problems with that but whatever.

I think the Q community, as usual, jumped right in to help Matt and that is the reason I remain on this list.

Mathew’s addition to this group is appreciated and once he gets settled, I would hope he could make it to LVK

Best regards,

Jim Patillo
N46JP Q200
Closing in on 1500 hours in my Q


Re: progress

Chris Walterson
 

I have the vertical stab attached along with tail spring and wheel. Working on the longerons and canopy mount. Have the ailerons and elevators made with the hinge pins installed.
Now for a question. Where is everyone installing the ELT, fire extinguisher and first aid kit. Doesn't seem to be many places.
I am also going to install dual rudder pedals. The plans say to hop in and find a comfortable position and install them there, but does anyone have any dimensions of the comfortable spacing? Take care-------------
Canada Chris


Rutan Aircraft Flying Experience first Quickie!

Ryszard Zadow
 

We're proud to announce the Rutan Aircraft Flying Experience has acquired a Quickie. It's a project, with two Onan engines and we hope to complete it. Currently located in the Florida Keys we are hoping to find some volunteers to help move it to our shop in Covington, Tenn. We'll be posting more in the next few days but just wanted to share this wit the Q list.

Sincerely,

Ryszard Zadow
Founder and President,
Rutan Aircraft Flying Experience
Like us on Facebook.



Re: Important Items for a Long Cross Country

Allan Farr
 

"Piece of mine" - clever/funny;)


Re: Important Items for a Long Cross Country

Jerry Marstall <jnmarstall@...>
 

Nose tire tube for sure on tri-gear. I carry both main and nose tubes



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


-------- Original message --------
From: "Phil Lankford britmcman@... [Q-LIST]" <Q-LIST@...>
Date: 12/20/17 5:40 PM (GMT-05:00)
To: Q-LIST@...
Subject: Re: [Q-LIST] Re: Important Items for a Long Cross Country

 

Consider carrying along tire inflation and tire repair items. 


Phil


On Dec 20, 2017, at 9:08 AM, jay@... [Q-LIST] <Q-LIST@...> wrote:

 

Hi Matthew,

Your job sounds great. I am glad you landed that.

As far as what to carry, I have a suggestion. I have a good friend who is a pilot of just about anything that flies. He does a corporate pilot job in a biz jet a couple times a month. He carries a "burn bag" fireproof thermal bag for the possibility that one of his ipad, iphone, etc. etc. batteries decides to melt down. He says he would just throw the device in there and seal it up. Would reduce a frightening cockpit emergency to a minor incident.

With all of the lithium powered devices we all carry now, it seems like a good idea. There is no way to put out a fire on those devices once the batteries start to burn.

I suggest you take Bruce's invitation to go to Enid. This time of year, the southern route is the only sure way to go. I have prepared a flight log for you from Enid, the first leg is 2 hours, with no other leg longer than 1.5 hours assuming a true groundspeed of 140 kts. In this route flies directly over many other suitable airports for your quickie. If you can go to 10500 feet MSL, you will have about 2000' of clearance over the highest points along the route and never be out of radio range for flight following. The route goes as follows:

Enid OK
Dahlhart, TX
Moriarity, NM (east of Albuquerque)
Grants, NM
Winslow, AZ
Prescott, AZ
Bullfrog/Lake Havasu AZ
Twentynine Palms, CA
..then over Palmdale and into Mojave

I have flown into most of these airports, only never having visited Enid and Twentynine Palms. All the others have long good quality runways and daylight attended fuel.

Wishing you clear skies and smooth flying! 

Oh, one other thing: remember to watch your airspeed carefully on final, as you land at higher and higher field elevations. It is easy to get fooled because your groundspeed is significantly higher for the same airspeed so your visual ques are different than you are used to at lower field elevations. At the higher altitude fields you will think you are coming in too fast, but you are not. Believe your airspeed.

Cheers,
Jay Scheevel, Tri-Q, stilll building

<Q200_navlog.pdf>


Re: Important Items for a Long Cross Country

Paul Fisher
 

Great idea Phil.  Since the Q tires are an odd size (most airports wouldn't have any in stock), I always carry a spare tube and tire with me.  Others have already mentioned the other things I carry - survival gear, tools, oil, canopy cover, etc.

Be safe and have a great trip!

Paul Fisher

On Dec 20, 2017 4:40 PM, "Phil Lankford britmcman@... [Q-LIST]" <Q-LIST@...> wrote:
 

Consider carrying along tire inflation and tire repair items. 


Phil


On Dec 20, 2017, at 9:08 AM, jay@... [Q-LIST] <Q-LIST@...> wrote:

 

Hi Matthew,

Your job sounds great. I am glad you landed that.

As far as what to carry, I have a suggestion. I have a good friend who is a pilot of just about anything that flies. He does a corporate pilot job in a biz jet a couple times a month. He carries a "burn bag" fireproof thermal bag for the possibility that one of his ipad, iphone, etc. etc. batteries decides to melt down. He says he would just throw the device in there and seal it up. Would reduce a frightening cockpit emergency to a minor incident.

With all of the lithium powered devices we all carry now, it seems like a good idea. There is no way to put out a fire on those devices once the batteries start to burn.

I suggest you take Bruce's invitation to go to Enid. This time of year, the southern route is the only sure way to go. I have prepared a flight log for you from Enid, the first leg is 2 hours, with no other leg longer than 1.5 hours assuming a true groundspeed of 140 kts. In this route flies directly over many other suitable airports for your quickie. If you can go to 10500 feet MSL, you will have about 2000' of clearance over the highest points along the route and never be out of radio range for flight following. The route goes as follows:

Enid OK
Dahlhart, TX
Moriarity, NM (east of Albuquerque)
Grants, NM
Winslow, AZ
Prescott, AZ
Bullfrog/Lake Havasu AZ
Twentynine Palms, CA
..then over Palmdale and into Mojave

I have flown into most of these airports, only never having visited Enid and Twentynine Palms. All the others have long good quality runways and daylight attended fuel.

Wishing you clear skies and smooth flying! 

Oh, one other thing: remember to watch your airspeed carefully on final, as you land at higher and higher field elevations. It is easy to get fooled because your groundspeed is significantly higher for the same airspeed so your visual ques are different than you are used to at lower field elevations. At the higher altitude fields you will think you are coming in too fast, but you are not. Believe your airspeed.

Cheers,
Jay Scheevel, Tri-Q, stilll building


Re: Important Items for a Long Cross Country

Sam Hoskins
 

Good point, Phil. I do carry a spare tube in my kit. I've had to use it a couple of times over the years.

Sam


On Wed, Dec 20, 2017 at 4:40 PM Phil Lankford britmcman@... [Q-LIST] <Q-LIST@...> wrote:
 

Consider carrying along tire inflation and tire repair items. 


Phil


On Dec 20, 2017, at 9:08 AM, jay@... [Q-LIST] <Q-LIST@...> wrote:

 

Hi Matthew,

Your job sounds great. I am glad you landed that.

As far as what to carry, I have a suggestion. I have a good friend who is a pilot of just about anything that flies. He does a corporate pilot job in a biz jet a couple times a month. He carries a "burn bag" fireproof thermal bag for the possibility that one of his ipad, iphone, etc. etc. batteries decides to melt down. He says he would just throw the device in there and seal it up. Would reduce a frightening cockpit emergency to a minor incident.

With all of the lithium powered devices we all carry now, it seems like a good idea. There is no way to put out a fire on those devices once the batteries start to burn.

I suggest you take Bruce's invitation to go to Enid. This time of year, the southern route is the only sure way to go. I have prepared a flight log for you from Enid, the first leg is 2 hours, with no other leg longer than 1.5 hours assuming a true groundspeed of 140 kts. In this route flies directly over many other suitable airports for your quickie. If you can go to 10500 feet MSL, you will have about 2000' of clearance over the highest points along the route and never be out of radio range for flight following. The route goes as follows:

Enid OK
Dahlhart, TX
Moriarity, NM (east of Albuquerque)
Grants, NM
Winslow, AZ
Prescott, AZ
Bullfrog/Lake Havasu AZ
Twentynine Palms, CA
..then over Palmdale and into Mojave

I have flown into most of these airports, only never having visited Enid and Twentynine Palms. All the others have long good quality runways and daylight attended fuel.

Wishing you clear skies and smooth flying! 

Oh, one other thing: remember to watch your airspeed carefully on final, as you land at higher and higher field elevations. It is easy to get fooled because your groundspeed is significantly higher for the same airspeed so your visual ques are different than you are used to at lower field elevations. At the higher altitude fields you will think you are coming in too fast, but you are not. Believe your airspeed.

Cheers,
Jay Scheevel, Tri-Q, stilll building


Re: Important Items for a Long Cross Country

britmcman99
 

I am based in El Cajon, CA Gillespie Field (KSEE). Nice stopover if you need to and also consider Ramona (KRNM). 


On Dec 20, 2017, at 11:18 AM, Matthew Curcio mlcurcio89@... [Q-LIST] <Q-LIST@...> wrote:

 

Oh yeah and thanks for the reminder on airspeeds. That’s something I’ll have to keep telling myself. I’m actually going to most likely fly to imperial county airport in California to spend the new year with some friends at the glamis sand dunes and then up to Mojave (tehachapi actually). I think your route should be pretty close to that anyways and but I won’t have time to check until later today or tomorrow. I think going there will be good as it gives me a good reason to steer well clear of all the big mountains.


Thanks,

Matthew Curcio
419-290-3773


On Dec 20, 2017, at 9:52 AM, 'Jay Scheevel SGT' jay@... [Q-LIST] <Q-LIST@...> wrote:

 

Hi Matthew,

 

Your job sounds great. I am glad you landed that.

 

As far as what to carry, I have a suggestion. I have a good friend who is a pilot of just about anything that flies. He does a corporate pilot job in a biz jet a couple times a month. He carries a "burn bag" fireproof thermal bag for the possibility that one of his ipad, iphone, etc. etc. batteries decides to melt down. He says he would just throw the device in there and seal it up. Would reduce a frightening cockpit emergency to a minor incident.

 

With all of the lithium powered devices we all carry now, it seems like a good idea. There is no way to put out a fire on those devices once the batteries start to burn.

 

I suggest you take Bruce's invitation to go to Enid. This time of year, the southern route is the only sure way to go. I have prepared a flight log for you from Enid, the first leg is 2 hours, with no other leg longer than 1.5 hours assuming a true groundspeed of 140 kts. In this route flies directly over many other suitable airports for your quickie. If you can go to 10500 feet MSL, you will have about 2000' of clearance over the highest points along the route and never be out of radio range for flight following. The route goes as follows:

 

Enid OK

Dahlhart, TX

Moriarity, NM (east of Albuquerque)

Grants, NM

Winslow, AZ

Prescott, AZ

Bullfrog/Lake Havasu AZ

Twentynine Palms, CA

..then over Palmdale and into Mojave

 

I have flown into most of these airports, only never having visited Enid and Twentynine Palms. All the others have long good quality runways and daylight attended fuel.

 

Wishing you clear skies and smooth flying!

 

Oh, one other thing: remember to watch your airspeed carefully on final, as you land at higher and higher field elevations. It is easy to get fooled because your groundspeed is significantly higher for the same airspeed so your visual ques are different than you are used to at lower field elevations. At the higher altitude fields you will think you are coming in too fast, but you are not. Believe your airspeed.

 

Cheers,

Jay Scheevel, Tri-Q, stilll building


Re: Important Items for a Long Cross Country

britmcman99
 

Consider carrying along tire inflation and tire repair items. 

Phil


On Dec 20, 2017, at 9:08 AM, jay@... [Q-LIST] <Q-LIST@...> wrote:

 

Hi Matthew,

Your job sounds great. I am glad you landed that.

As far as what to carry, I have a suggestion. I have a good friend who is a pilot of just about anything that flies. He does a corporate pilot job in a biz jet a couple times a month. He carries a "burn bag" fireproof thermal bag for the possibility that one of his ipad, iphone, etc. etc. batteries decides to melt down. He says he would just throw the device in there and seal it up. Would reduce a frightening cockpit emergency to a minor incident.

With all of the lithium powered devices we all carry now, it seems like a good idea. There is no way to put out a fire on those devices once the batteries start to burn.

I suggest you take Bruce's invitation to go to Enid. This time of year, the southern route is the only sure way to go. I have prepared a flight log for you from Enid, the first leg is 2 hours, with no other leg longer than 1.5 hours assuming a true groundspeed of 140 kts. In this route flies directly over many other suitable airports for your quickie. If you can go to 10500 feet MSL, you will have about 2000' of clearance over the highest points along the route and never be out of radio range for flight following. The route goes as follows:

Enid OK
Dahlhart, TX
Moriarity, NM (east of Albuquerque)
Grants, NM
Winslow, AZ
Prescott, AZ
Bullfrog/Lake Havasu AZ
Twentynine Palms, CA
..then over Palmdale and into Mojave

I have flown into most of these airports, only never having visited Enid and Twentynine Palms. All the others have long good quality runways and daylight attended fuel.

Wishing you clear skies and smooth flying! 

Oh, one other thing: remember to watch your airspeed carefully on final, as you land at higher and higher field elevations. It is easy to get fooled because your groundspeed is significantly higher for the same airspeed so your visual ques are different than you are used to at lower field elevations. At the higher altitude fields you will think you are coming in too fast, but you are not. Believe your airspeed.

Cheers,
Jay Scheevel, Tri-Q, stilll building


Re: Important Items for a Long Cross Country

Matthew Curcio
 

Oh yeah and thanks for the reminder on airspeeds. That’s something I’ll have to keep telling myself. I’m actually going to most likely fly to imperial county airport in California to spend the new year with some friends at the glamis sand dunes and then up to Mojave (tehachapi actually). I think your route should be pretty close to that anyways and but I won’t have time to check until later today or tomorrow. I think going there will be good as it gives me a good reason to steer well clear of all the big mountains.

Thanks,

Matthew Curcio
419-290-3773


On Dec 20, 2017, at 9:52 AM, 'Jay Scheevel SGT' jay@... [Q-LIST] <Q-LIST@...> wrote:

 

Hi Matthew,

 

Your job sounds great. I am glad you landed that.

 

As far as what to carry, I have a suggestion. I have a good friend who is a pilot of just about anything that flies. He does a corporate pilot job in a biz jet a couple times a month. He carries a "burn bag" fireproof thermal bag for the possibility that one of his ipad, iphone, etc. etc. batteries decides to melt down. He says he would just throw the device in there and seal it up. Would reduce a frightening cockpit emergency to a minor incident.

 

With all of the lithium powered devices we all carry now, it seems like a good idea. There is no way to put out a fire on those devices once the batteries start to burn.

 

I suggest you take Bruce's invitation to go to Enid. This time of year, the southern route is the only sure way to go. I have prepared a flight log for you from Enid, the first leg is 2 hours, with no other leg longer than 1.5 hours assuming a true groundspeed of 140 kts. In this route flies directly over many other suitable airports for your quickie. If you can go to 10500 feet MSL, you will have about 2000' of clearance over the highest points along the route and never be out of radio range for flight following. The route goes as follows:

 

Enid OK

Dahlhart, TX

Moriarity, NM (east of Albuquerque)

Grants, NM

Winslow, AZ

Prescott, AZ

Bullfrog/Lake Havasu AZ

Twentynine Palms, CA

..then over Palmdale and into Mojave

 

I have flown into most of these airports, only never having visited Enid and Twentynine Palms. All the others have long good quality runways and daylight attended fuel.

 

Wishing you clear skies and smooth flying!

 

Oh, one other thing: remember to watch your airspeed carefully on final, as you land at higher and higher field elevations. It is easy to get fooled because your groundspeed is significantly higher for the same airspeed so your visual ques are different than you are used to at lower field elevations. At the higher altitude fields you will think you are coming in too fast, but you are not. Believe your airspeed.

 

Cheers,

Jay Scheevel, Tri-Q, stilll building

<Q200_navlog.pdf>


Re: Important Items for a Long Cross Country

Matthew Curcio
 

Thanks! For the suggestions, I like the idea of the battery bag. That is a very good consideration especially with the gas tank being such close proximity to where you might toss something on the passenger seat. 

Matthew Curcio
419-290-3773


On Dec 20, 2017, at 9:52 AM, 'Jay Scheevel SGT' jay@... [Q-LIST] <Q-LIST@...> wrote:

 

Hi Matthew,

 

Your job sounds great. I am glad you landed that.

 

As far as what to carry, I have a suggestion. I have a good friend who is a pilot of just about anything that flies. He does a corporate pilot job in a biz jet a couple times a month. He carries a "burn bag" fireproof thermal bag for the possibility that one of his ipad, iphone, etc. etc. batteries decides to melt down. He says he would just throw the device in there and seal it up. Would reduce a frightening cockpit emergency to a minor incident.

 

With all of the lithium powered devices we all carry now, it seems like a good idea. There is no way to put out a fire on those devices once the batteries start to burn.

 

I suggest you take Bruce's invitation to go to Enid. This time of year, the southern route is the only sure way to go. I have prepared a flight log for you from Enid, the first leg is 2 hours, with no other leg longer than 1.5 hours assuming a true groundspeed of 140 kts. In this route flies directly over many other suitable airports for your quickie. If you can go to 10500 feet MSL, you will have about 2000' of clearance over the highest points along the route and never be out of radio range for flight following. The route goes as follows:

 

Enid OK

Dahlhart, TX

Moriarity, NM (east of Albuquerque)

Grants, NM

Winslow, AZ

Prescott, AZ

Bullfrog/Lake Havasu AZ

Twentynine Palms, CA

..then over Palmdale and into Mojave

 

I have flown into most of these airports, only never having visited Enid and Twentynine Palms. All the others have long good quality runways and daylight attended fuel.

 

Wishing you clear skies and smooth flying!

 

Oh, one other thing: remember to watch your airspeed carefully on final, as you land at higher and higher field elevations. It is easy to get fooled because your groundspeed is significantly higher for the same airspeed so your visual ques are different than you are used to at lower field elevations. At the higher altitude fields you will think you are coming in too fast, but you are not. Believe your airspeed.

 

Cheers,

Jay Scheevel, Tri-Q, stilll building

<Q200_navlog.pdf>


Re: Important Items for a Long Cross Country

Jay Scheevel
 

Hi Matthew,

 

Your job sounds great. I am glad you landed that.

 

As far as what to carry, I have a suggestion. I have a good friend who is a pilot of just about anything that flies. He does a corporate pilot job in a biz jet a couple times a month. He carries a "burn bag" fireproof thermal bag for the possibility that one of his ipad, iphone, etc. etc. batteries decides to melt down. He says he would just throw the device in there and seal it up. Would reduce a frightening cockpit emergency to a minor incident.

 

With all of the lithium powered devices we all carry now, it seems like a good idea. There is no way to put out a fire on those devices once the batteries start to burn.

 

I suggest you take Bruce's invitation to go to Enid. This time of year, the southern route is the only sure way to go. I have prepared a flight log for you from Enid, the first leg is 2 hours, with no other leg longer than 1.5 hours assuming a true groundspeed of 140 kts. In this route flies directly over many other suitable airports for your quickie. If you can go to 10500 feet MSL, you will have about 2000' of clearance over the highest points along the route and never be out of radio range for flight following. The route goes as follows:

 

Enid OK

Dahlhart, TX

Moriarity, NM (east of Albuquerque)

Grants, NM

Winslow, AZ

Prescott, AZ

Bullfrog/Lake Havasu AZ

Twentynine Palms, CA

..then over Palmdale and into Mojave

 

I have flown into most of these airports, only never having visited Enid and Twentynine Palms. All the others have long good quality runways and daylight attended fuel.

 

Wishing you clear skies and smooth flying!

 

Oh, one other thing: remember to watch your airspeed carefully on final, as you land at higher and higher field elevations. It is easy to get fooled because your groundspeed is significantly higher for the same airspeed so your visual ques are different than you are used to at lower field elevations. At the higher altitude fields you will think you are coming in too fast, but you are not. Believe your airspeed.

 

Cheers,

Jay Scheevel, Tri-Q, stilll building


Re: Important Items for a Long Cross Country

Jay Scheevel
 

Hi Matthew,

Your job sounds great. I am glad you landed that.

As far as what to carry, I have a suggestion. I have a good friend who is a pilot of just about anything that flies. He does a corporate pilot job in a biz jet a couple times a month. He carries a "burn bag" fireproof thermal bag for the possibility that one of his ipad, iphone, etc. etc. batteries decides to melt down. He says he would just throw the device in there and seal it up. Would reduce a frightening cockpit emergency to a minor incident.

With all of the lithium powered devices we all carry now, it seems like a good idea. There is no way to put out a fire on those devices once the batteries start to burn.

I suggest you take Bruce's invitation to go to Enid. This time of year, the southern route is the only sure way to go. I have prepared a flight log for you from Enid, the first leg is 2 hours, with no other leg longer than 1.5 hours assuming a true groundspeed of 140 kts. In this route flies directly over many other suitable airports for your quickie. If you can go to 10500 feet MSL, you will have about 2000' of clearance over the highest points along the route and never be out of radio range for flight following. The route goes as follows:

Enid OK
Dahlhart, TX
Moriarity, NM (east of Albuquerque)
Grants, NM
Winslow, AZ
Prescott, AZ
Bullfrog/Lake Havasu AZ
Twentynine Palms, CA
..then over Palmdale and into Mojave

I have flown into most of these airports, only never having visited Enid and Twentynine Palms. All the others have long good quality runways and daylight attended fuel.

Wishing you clear skies and smooth flying! 

Oh, one other thing: remember to watch your airspeed carefully on final, as you land at higher and higher field elevations. It is easy to get fooled because your groundspeed is significantly higher for the same airspeed so your visual ques are different than you are used to at lower field elevations. At the higher altitude fields you will think you are coming in too fast, but you are not. Believe your airspeed.

Cheers,
Jay Scheevel, Tri-Q, stilll building


Re: Important Items for a Long Cross Country

Jay Scheevel
 

Hi Matthew,

Your job sounds great. I am glad you landed that.

As far as what to carry, I have a suggestion. I have a good friend who is a pilot of just about anything that flies. He does a corporate pilot job in a biz jet a couple times a month. He carries a "burn bag" fireproof thermal bag for the possibility that one of his ipad, iphone, etc. etc. batteries decides to melt down. He says he would just throw the device in there and seal it up. Would reduce a frightening cockpit emergency to a minor incident.

With all of the lithium powered devices we all carry now, it seems like a good idea. There is no way to put out a fire on those devices once the batteries start to burn.

I suggest you take Bruce's invitation to go to Enid. This time of year, the southern route is the only sure way to go. I have prepared a flight log for you from Enid, the first leg is 2 hours, with no other leg longer than 1.5 hours assuming a true groundspeed of 140 kts. In this route flies directly over many other suitable airports for your quickie. If you can go to 10500 feet MSL, you will have about 2000' of clearance over the highest points along the route and never be out of radio range for flight following. The route goes as follows:

Enid OK
Dahlhart, TX
Moriarity, NM (east of Albuquerque)
Grants, NM
Winslow, AZ
Prescott, AZ
Bullfrog/Lake Havasu AZ
Twentynine Palms, CA
..then over Palmdale and into Mojave

I have flown into most of these airports, only never having visited Enid and Twentynine Palms. All the others have long good quality runways and daylight attended fuel.

Wishing you clear skies and smooth flying! 

Oh, one other thing: remember to watch your airspeed carefully on final, as you land at higher and higher field elevations. It is easy to get fooled because your groundspeed is significantly higher for the same airspeed so your visual ques are different than you are used to at lower field elevations. At the higher altitude fields you will think you are coming in too fast, but you are not. Believe your airspeed.

Cheers,
Jay Scheevel, Tri-Q, stilll building


Re: Important Items for a Long Cross Country

Jay Scheevel
 

Hi Matthew,

Your job sounds great. I am glad you landed that.

As far as what to carry, I have a suggestion. I have a good friend who is a pilot of just about anything that flies. He does a corporate pilot job in a biz jet a couple times a month. He carries a "burn bag" fireproof thermal bag for the possibility that one of his ipad, iphone, etc. etc. batteries decides to melt down. He says he would just throw the device in there and seal it up. Would reduce a frightening cockpit emergency to a minor incident.

With all of the lithium powered devices we all carry now, it seems like a good idea. There is no way to put out a fire on those devices once the batteries start to burn.

I suggest you take Bruce's invitation to go to Enid. This time of year, the southern route is the only sure way to go. I have prepared a flight log for you from Enid, the first leg is 2 hours, with no other leg longer than 1.5 hours assuming a true groundspeed of 140 kts. In this route flies directly over many other suitable airports for your quickie. If you can go to 10500 feet MSL, you will have about 2000' of clearance over the highest points along the route and never be out of radio range for flight following. The route goes as follows:

Enid OK
Dahlhart, TX
Moriarity, NM (east of Albuquerque)
Grants, NM
Winslow, AZ
Prescott, AZ
Bullfrog/Lake Havasu AZ
Twentynine Palms, CA
..then over Palmdale and into Mojave

I have flown into most of these airports, only never having visited Enid and Twentynine Palms. All the others have long good quality runways and daylight attended fuel.

Wishing you clear skies and smooth flying! 

Oh, one other thing: remember to watch your airspeed carefully on final, as you land at higher and higher field elevations. It is easy to get fooled because your groundspeed is significantly higher for the same airspeed so your visual ques are different than you are used to at lower field elevations. At the higher altitude fields you will think you are coming in too fast, but you are not. Believe your airspeed.

Cheers,
Jay Scheevel, Tri-Q, stilll building


Re: Important Items for a Long Cross Country

Jim Patillo
 

Correction: “pumps directly from AUX tank to Header tank”

Jim

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