Date   

contact Floyd Welch

norm_parm@...
 

I am trying to contact Floyd Welch, or his son Daniel Welch-Anema. Mr. Floyd built the Q2 I currently own and I would like too ask him some questions.



Re: High speed taxi

Sam Hoskins
 

I have met with Corbin and he is doing this all in the right fashion. He's been cautious when there has been issues with the aircraft, he is a very current pilot, he has had the aircraft repositioned to a wide and long runway, and he is taking things logically. I think he's got over 10 hours in this aircraft himself, in the right seat. I think he's doing about as well as we might expect. Certainly, he is going into this with much more experience than I had with my first flight.

Sam 

On Sun, Apr 14, 2019, 2:11 AM David@... [Q-LIST] <Q-LIST@...> wrote:
 

Corbin, I worry for your safety. You seem much too cavalier in your approach to this task. Please let an experienced Q driver do your taxi testing and initial test flights. At the least, wear a helmet....


Re: High speed taxi

Corbin Geiser <c_geiser@...>
 

Thanks David.  Do you mean beyond the training I’ve already done with my instructor that received the Q200 training from the builder?  What’s your recommendation?  

Corbin

On Apr 14, 2019, at 2:08 AM, David@... [Q-LIST] <Q-LIST@...> wrote:

 

Corbin, I worry for your safety. You seem much too cavalier in your approach to this task. Please let an experienced Q driver do your taxi testing and initial test flights. At the least, wear a helmet....


Re: High speed taxi

David J. Gall
 

Corbin, I worry for your safety. You seem much too cavalier in your approach to this task. Please let an experienced Q driver do your taxi testing and initial test flights. At the least, wear a helmet....


Re: High speed taxi

Corbin Geiser <c_geiser@...>
 

Great...thanks!  I consider high speed 10 mph under rotation speed so I think we are good there.  Much appreciated!

Corbin

On Apr 13, 2019, at 8:35 AM, Paul Fisher rv7a.n18pf@... [Q-LIST] <Q-LIST@...> wrote:

 

I agree, be very careful with power changes at high speed.  It can get away from you really quickly.  If you've got 7000 feet plan on using it all.

I wouldn't plan for anything faster than 60-65 MPH for taxi tests.  Anything faster and you risk departing the runway.  Which brings up another point.  ALWAYS wear your seatbelt and carry enough fuel just in case you do get off the ground.  You need to be prepared to fly because you don't know your exact lift off speed (nor do you know if your airspeed indicator is accurate).  You may think you are just doing taxi tests, but becoming airborne is a definite possibility.

Good luck and be safe!

Paul Fisher
Q-200 N17PF

On Sat, Apr 13, 2019, 07:24 Jerry Marstall jnmarstall@... [Q-LIST] <Q-LIST@...> wrote:
 

Rapid reduction in power at high speed definitely invites LOC.  Slow reduction in power invites the possibility of going off the end of the runway.


Moderate speed taxi with slow acceleration and reduction to get feel for A/C more beneficial.  I agree with Paul.
Jerry

-------- Original message --------
From: "wypaul2001@... [Q-LIST]" <Q-LIST@...>
Date: 4/13/19 8:12 AM (GMT-05:00)
Subject: [Q-LIST] High speed taxi

 

Corbin, I see in your latest video you are planning some high speed taxi tests and crow hops. Both of those will increase your odds of an accident with very little benefit IMHO. Adverse yaw is also a big factor on roll out and can cause the bird to dart opposite the direction of the stick move. There are lots of pilots on here with lots of hours that may have some suggestions about these ideas.


Re: High speed taxi

Paul Fisher
 

I agree, be very careful with power changes at high speed.  It can get away from you really quickly.  If you've got 7000 feet plan on using it all.

I wouldn't plan for anything faster than 60-65 MPH for taxi tests.  Anything faster and you risk departing the runway.  Which brings up another point.  ALWAYS wear your seatbelt and carry enough fuel just in case you do get off the ground.  You need to be prepared to fly because you don't know your exact lift off speed (nor do you know if your airspeed indicator is accurate).  You may think you are just doing taxi tests, but becoming airborne is a definite possibility.

Good luck and be safe!

Paul Fisher
Q-200 N17PF

On Sat, Apr 13, 2019, 07:24 Jerry Marstall jnmarstall@... [Q-LIST] <Q-LIST@...> wrote:
 

Rapid reduction in power at high speed definitely invites LOC.  Slow reduction in power invites the possibility of going off the end of the runway.


Moderate speed taxi with slow acceleration and reduction to get feel for A/C more beneficial.  I agree with Paul.
Jerry

-------- Original message --------
From: "wypaul2001@... [Q-LIST]" <Q-LIST@...>
Date: 4/13/19 8:12 AM (GMT-05:00)
Subject: [Q-LIST] High speed taxi

 

Corbin, I see in your latest video you are planning some high speed taxi tests and crow hops. Both of those will increase your odds of an accident with very little benefit IMHO. Adverse yaw is also a big factor on roll out and can cause the bird to dart opposite the direction of the stick move. There are lots of pilots on here with lots of hours that may have some suggestions about these ideas.


Re: High speed taxi

Jerry Marstall <jnmarstall@...>
 

LOC - Loss Of Control

-------- Original message --------
From: "c_geiser@... [Q-LIST]" <Q-LIST@...>
Date: 4/13/19 9:03 AM (GMT-05:00)
To: Q-LIST@...
Subject: Re: [Q-LIST] High speed taxi

 

Thanks guys!  Just so I am sure, what is LOC?  Also, the low to medium to high speed taxi work is what is recommended in the POH I have seen.  If these are no longer the preferred methods I would love hearing recommendations as I plan on starting very soon.


I was planning on slow reduction since I am on a 7,000ft runway.

Thanks again.


Re: High speed taxi

c_geiser@...
 

Thanks guys!  Just so I am sure, what is LOC?  Also, the low to medium to high speed taxi work is what is recommended in the POH I have seen.  If these are no longer the preferred methods I would love hearing recommendations as I plan on starting very soon.

I was planning on slow reduction since I am on a 7,000ft runway.

Thanks again.


Re: High speed taxi

Jerry Marstall <jnmarstall@...>
 

Rapid reduction in power at high speed definitely invites LOC.  Slow reduction in power invites the possibility of going off the end of the runway.

Moderate speed taxi with slow acceleration and reduction to get feel for A/C more beneficial.  I agree with Paul.
Jerry

-------- Original message --------
From: "wypaul2001@... [Q-LIST]" <Q-LIST@...>
Date: 4/13/19 8:12 AM (GMT-05:00)
To: Q-LIST@...
Subject: [Q-LIST] High speed taxi

 

Corbin, I see in your latest video you are planning some high speed taxi tests and crow hops. Both of those will increase your odds of an accident with very little benefit IMHO. Adverse yaw is also a big factor on roll out and can cause the bird to dart opposite the direction of the stick move. There are lots of pilots on here with lots of hours that may have some suggestions about these ideas.


High speed taxi

Paul Spackman
 

Corbin, I see in your latest video you are planning some high speed taxi tests and crow hops. Both of those will increase your odds of an accident with very little benefit IMHO. Adverse yaw is also a big factor on roll out and can cause the bird to dart opposite the direction of the stick move. There are lots of pilots on here with lots of hours that may have some suggestions about these ideas.


Re: Which prop for a TriQ-200

Jon Matcho
 

Paul wrote:  I have a Sterba 60"x68" for my standard compression O-200 that I have been using for about 25 years.  I hope that helps.

 

It does!  Attached is a pic of your prop (let’s see if this list allows file attachments). 

 

I THINK the Warnke 60” x 68” came with the Q2 kits as well.

 

Thanks!

Jon

 

 

 

Jon Matcho

Repairing Quickie TriQ-200

Building a Cozy Mark IV+ (widened rear)

www.canardzone.com

www.quickheads.com

 

 


Re: Which prop for a TriQ-200

Paul Fisher
 

Hi Jon,
I have a Sterba 60"x68" for my standard compression O-200 that I have been using for about 25 years.  I hope that helps.

Paul Fisher
Q-200 N17PF

On Fri, Apr 12, 2019, 19:54 jonmatcho@... [Q-LIST] <Q-LIST@...> wrote:
 

The Prince caught my eye a while ago and I haven’t heard anything bad about them (except for their large RC aircraft props!)

 

I expect I’ll be able to go with a no-frills prop initially from a long runway at first.  Once I turn “pro” I’ll fit a Prince or Catto.

 

I still don’t know what length and pitch of a climb prop that means…

 

Jon

 

 

Jon Matcho

Repairing Quickie TriQ-200

Building a Cozy Mark IV+ (widened rear)

www.canardzone.com

www.quickheads.com

 

 


Re: Which prop for a TriQ-200

Jon Matcho
 

The Prince caught my eye a while ago and I haven’t heard anything bad about them (except for their large RC aircraft props!)

 

I expect I’ll be able to go with a no-frills prop initially from a long runway at first.  Once I turn “pro” I’ll fit a Prince or Catto.

 

I still don’t know what length and pitch of a climb prop that means…

 

Jon

 

 

Jon Matcho

Repairing Quickie TriQ-200

Building a Cozy Mark IV+ (widened rear)

www.canardzone.com

www.quickheads.com

 

 


Re: Which prop for a TriQ-200

Jay Scheevel
 

Most common prop on the 0-200 among the Q200 crowd seems to be the Catto 2-blade. Catto has built a number of them, and as far as I know owners are happy with them.  Those with them can comment on price. I have a Prince prop on my Jabiru that I am happy with and Lynn French has recently installed a Prince prop on his O-200. Constant speed props on the Q-200 are rare. Bruce likes his. Imraan has a Warp drive 3-blade, if memory serves.

 

Cheers,

Jay

 

From: Q-LIST@...
Sent: Friday, April 12, 2019 12:57 PM
To: Q-LIST@...
Subject: [Q-LIST] Which prop for a TriQ-200

 

 

Hello everyone,

 

I am making a renewed push this year to get Earnest Martin’s TriQ-200 N479E back in the air.  I bought it from the 2nd owner after a main landing gear collapse.  It had a constant speed MT prop which was trashed from the incident.  That and the engine need rebuilding..

 

I WAS thinking to keep everything as-is, particularly since Bruce and (I think) Imraan have the same props on their TriQ-200s.  However, I don’t want to spend $7,000+ to REFURBISH the MT prop and get new blades.  With a few extra HP from high compression pistons I expect the CS won’t be necessary, which Earnest specifically mentioned to me as well.  Losing the MT CS the front-end weight will go down, which I also suspect contributes to nose gear collapses.  I realize I’ll need to do a new W&B on the aircraft.

 

Considering that, I have 2 questions:

 

  1. What propeller would be recommended for a TriQ-200?  I know this is a loaded question.  I’m just looking for ranges of climb vs. cruise props.
  2. Anyone want to convince me spend $7,000+ and keep the MT prop?  (donations are accepted 😊)

 

Best regards,

Jon

 

 

Jon Matcho

Repairing Quickie TriQ-200

Building a Cozy Mark IV+ (widened rear)

www.canardzone.com

www..quickheads.com

 

 

 

 


Which prop for a TriQ-200

Jon Matcho
 

Hello everyone,

 

I am making a renewed push this year to get Earnest Martin’s TriQ-200 N479E back in the air.  I bought it from the 2nd owner after a main landing gear collapse.  It had a constant speed MT prop which was trashed from the incident.  That and the engine need rebuilding.

 

I WAS thinking to keep everything as-is, particularly since Bruce and (I think) Imraan have the same props on their TriQ-200s.  However, I don’t want to spend $7,000+ to REFURBISH the MT prop and get new blades.  With a few extra HP from high compression pistons I expect the CS won’t be necessary, which Earnest specifically mentioned to me as well.  Losing the MT CS the front-end weight will go down, which I also suspect contributes to nose gear collapses.  I realize I’ll need to do a new W&B on the aircraft.

 

Considering that, I have 2 questions:

 

  1. What propeller would be recommended for a TriQ-200?  I know this is a loaded question.  I’m just looking for ranges of climb vs. cruise props.
  2. Anyone want to convince me spend $7,000+ and keep the MT prop?  (donations are accepted 😊)

 

Best regards,

Jon

 

 

Jon Matcho

Repairing Quickie TriQ-200

Building a Cozy Mark IV+ (widened rear)

www.canardzone.com

www.quickheads.com

 

 

 

 


Re: Minimum tire size

Paul Fisher
 

I agree with Sam.  I've never landed on grass and I don't intend to ever do so.  One small gopher hole could ruin your whole day.

I also use the standard Lamb tires.

Paul Fisher
Q-200, N17PF ~1650 hours over 28.5 years

On Thu, Apr 11, 2019, 15:05 sam.hoskins@... [Q-LIST] <Q-LIST@...> wrote:
 

Sorry, I should have provided some more information.

I do not land on rough fields or grass. You're going to be taking off and landing at roughly 70 miles an hour. Sometimes more. I just don't have any interest in taxing the system at all. There are a few of the guys who have landed on grass but not me. There have been a few occasions where I have flown with a gross weight of 1300 lbs.

That is a small wheel and it is turning pretty darn fast, and you don't have any real shock absorbers other than the canard itself.


Re: Minimum tire size

Sam Hoskins
 

Sorry, I should have provided some more information.

I do not land on rough fields or grass. You're going to be taking off and landing at roughly 70 miles an hour. Sometimes more. I just don't have any interest in taxing the system at all. There are a few of the guys who have landed on grass but not me. There have been a few occasions where I have flown with a gross weight of 1300 lbs.

That is a small wheel and it is turning pretty darn fast, and you don't have any real shock absorbers other than the canard itself.


Re: Minimum tire size

Shaun Milke
 

Great to know someone has tried them Sam!  What kind of landing weights have you gone up to?  Can you give a description of how practical they are on unpaved runways (mostly thinking dirt and gravel, but any experiences on grass or turf would be good to know as well).  I'm trying to get an idea of whether tires that small make the landing loads so high that anything but pavement is reserved for every now and then or if it can be done as a relatively normal operation.

Thanks,
Shaun


From: Q-LIST@... <Q-LIST@...> on behalf of sam.hoskins@... [Q-LIST] <Q-LIST@...>
Sent: Thursday, April 11, 2019 9:40 AM
To: Q-LIST@...
Subject: [Q-LIST] Re: Minimum tire size
 
 

Those are the tires I use. Sometimes called lamb tires. I inflate them to 50 psi.


Re: Minimum tire size

Sam Hoskins
 

Those are the tires I use. Sometimes called lamb tires. I inflate them to 50 psi.


Minimum tire size

Shaun Milke
 

After rebuilding the stock hydraulic brake system in my Q200 last year and finding a lot of problems that will eventually require replacement of wheels, calipers, axles and mounting structure, I've started looking at ways to increase efficiency rather than buying direct replacement parts and rebuilding the stock design.  I plan to at least refine the fairing of the wheel pants and install new wheels, so I'm wondering what the minimum practical wheel and tire sizes really are.  I'm considering using 11-4.00x5 tires and wheels and rebuilding the structural portion of the wheel pants so that the original ground pitch attitude is unchanged.  My main concern is that these tires will be unacceptably stiff and I'm not really willing to sacrifice the ability to land on unpaved runways, for me that's one of the main advantages of the quickie over all the pushers.  What I'd like to know is- what is the smallest tire anyone has ever installed on a quickie and what were the results?

-Shaun

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