Date   

Fw: Jay Scheevels new Q200+!!

Bruce Crain
 


Fw: Dave Dugas and Rodney Herzig

Bruce Crain
 


Fw: Great Western Representatives!

Bruce Crain
 


Fw: Field Of Dreams Moments

Bruce Crain
 


Re: My Q is back up

Matthew Curcio
 

Hot oil and less than 1k I’m 18-20psi. That’s twice what it was before but my cruise oil pressure is the exact same as it was before. The relief valve seat was resurfaced so that’s not leaking I’m pretty confident that my spring is just a little tired. I have a new one waiting to go in next time I yank the engine off. My oil pressure is fine it’s just on the low end of spec and I figure mine as well put a new spring in there.

Matthew Curcio
419-290-3773


On Sep 25, 2019, at 13:02, q2pilot@... [Q-LIST] <Q-LIST@...> wrote:

 

You are an animal.  Most people would have taken a year to do all that!


I recently put on 4 new Superiors also.  I was burning 2 hours per quart...  I flew for 10 hours before I dropped the rpm below 2700 at sea level.  30 hours on it and I'm amazed how little oil it is using 15.6 hours per qt.   Those push rod tubes... they get loose by man handling the rubber during installation.  Pretty normal.  Now that you got the tool just put it in a safe place cause in 5 years you'll forget where you put it!

I promise not to touch the canopy latch until fully stopped from now on!  

I'm curious how your oil pressure is when your taxing in with hot oil and <1000 rpm.

Thanks for the warning,
Mike Q200 N3QP 1400 hours.


  


Re: My Q is back up

Matthew Curcio
 

I’ll plan to be there and I really hope my lessons learned help some people out! Honestly, the trickiest part of the timeline for me was the fact that my girlfriend lives in Orange County which is a 45min q2 flight or 5 hour drive at the wrong time of day. Understandably, she was a bit disappointed with me being gone during all of my summer trips and I had been telling her that I’d have more time to spend down there after finishing these trips and then this happened. I ended up just using mon-Friday to work on the plane and driving down to OC for the weekends. There were some late weeknights no doubt! 

Meant to add these pics on the first email 
Firewall before (yuk):

Firewall after:

Engine:

Properly rolled pushrod tube

Improper (leaking):
I imagine that as these get hot the differential expansion means the slight press got on the tube turns into a slight clearance fit and without the bead you’ll get a leak. I doubt there was even any deformation of the tube on the OD of this one. 


Matthew Curcio
419-290-3773


On Sep 25, 2019, at 13:04, JMasal@... [Q-LIST] <Q-LIST@...> wrote:

 

Hey Curcio,

Heckova thorough helpful post you just sent. First on the pilot technique lessons which should be considered by all of us who sometimes rest on our laurels, next on the close inspection of the whole airframe after an incident and lastly on your engine upgrades and resultant performance. Yay!!
You missed an outstanding FOD but we will expect you there next year same place, about the same time.
Details coming.
Thanks for taking the time to write this.
j.


-----Original Message-----
From: Matthew Curcio mlcurcio89@... [Q-LIST] <Q-LIST@yahoogroups..com>
To: Q-LIST@... <Q-LIST@...>
Sent: Wed, Sep 25, 2019 2:28 pm
Subject: [Q-LIST] My Q is back up

 
Hey all, 

My apologies for not being able to make it to FOD - explanation to come. I think at least a few of you know that me and the q bird had a bit of an incident on the way back from OSH. I was pretty conscious of the fact that all of my adventures and 200 hours of time in the 2 months prior to OSH put me in a situation where I was likely on the unhealthy side of the proficiency curve where confidence and complacency become you're greatest enemy. Sure enough it got me. I did a non stop leg from OSH to Rock Springs Wyoming and noticed a good bit of fatigue before landing there. Since there isn't much there I figured I'd make the hour trek to Spanish Fork where I knew I could get a good bite to eat, some caffeine and recuperate a bit and then finish off the final ~3 hrs of the trip. While taxing back to the FBO I cracked my canopy and latched it in the cracked position and then about 10 seconds later I noticed the canopy had come unlatched and was trying to swing open. as I reached up to grab it I swerved off of the taxi way and while I didn't entirely lose control I knew if I forced it back on to the taxi way I would. There were no visible obstacles so I figured I'd just bring it to a stop. Unbeknownst to me, there was a little rut of dirt obscured by some tall grass that grabbed the right main and pulled me around hard to the right 90° and as the left main hit that rut it nosed in and struck the prop.  When it came back down the tail spring broke off. The wheelpants received some damage when it nosed forward as well as the spinner. I arranged a ride to get home that night (from a co-worker who had actually just gotten back from OSH flying Burt's catbird, on the cover of sport av this month). Made the 8 hour drive the next week with a friend and a trailer to bring the airplane home. It was shocking and disappointing but I was very grateful to have repairable damage with minimal structural impact, no physical harm, and close enough to home - especially given how far I had been. 

Human Factors lessons learned. I immediately was kicking myself because this was day two of ground school stuff - don't re-configure while moving and taxi at a brisk walk. I had gotten comfortable taxiing the airplane fast and justified that its wide stance makes it a little more forgiving than something like a pitts for example. The next day I started to realize that I really hadn't done anything differently from the way I normally operate and so I can't kick myself or say what if because I would have done it the same every other day. The problem was really everything. I really sympathize with Mark Patey's accident for this reason. Sure it's easy for the guy who puts 20 hours a year on a 172 to cry foul but we're out here flying hundreds of hours a year to unique placed in very unique experimental with loosely defined operating limits. We built (to some extent) the things and take great pride in them so when you get proficiently proficient it's extremely difficult to know what is "expanding the envelope" vs. reckless and careless operations. What I realized was while I was fatigued that played only a marginal roll. The primary issue was a lack of margin. Sure I can taxi fast and multi task a little 999 times of 1000 (literally) and be fine but the one time where I need a little extra bandwidth I'm not going to have it. It isn't about what the limits are it is about what the margin is on you and your airplanes limits. That is what I learned more than anything and I've changed the way I operate accordingly. I'm happy to have learned that lesson the way I did at this point in my life and aviation experience. 

Lessons learned on the airframe side, this is short. Upon closer inspection I found some additional damage on the fuselage at the lower corners of the canopy cutout. There was a 3.5" crack on both sides of the outer skin running circumferentially. No doubt a failure of the matrix and weave in compression due to the huge load in Z at the tail when it came down. Digging in deaper I found no damage to the core but the inner skin had a compression failure running down along the seat back bulkhead 4" long. I did a burn test and found it was just two plies of glass in that area and the 2 ply tapes wrapping from the bulkhead and down along the wood stringer were just acting as additional stress concentrators. You have a huge discontinuity in the fuselage cross section there, making a huge stress riser and literally nothing was done in the design to provide any relief. I didn't do any math but at least a couple of re-enforcing plies would make a big difference and there is so much bondo in that area it's basically free. This is an area I would advise folks pay close attention to and if you have any cracks in the paint I wouldn't fly until sanding the paint and verifying the matrix and fibers aren't compromised (and then probably put a couple plies down for grandma). 

I spent the following 7 weeks making the structural repairs and overhauling my engine. I sent the ferrous bits over to aircraft specialties and the case to Divco. I was pleased with the prices and turn around I was able to get out of both. Aircraft Specialties did really good work and had very good customer service and status tracking. I would use them again in a heartbeat. I had AS balance the crank while they had it. Divco is Divco but they got it done for me in 13 days, so I can't complain. I bought a new set of superior millenium cylinders, matched the intake elbows to the heads (exhaust side was good) and had lycon flow the heads. I used Lycon's 9:1 pistons. I balanced the pistons, rings, and pins to 0.1g. I also balanced the connecting Rods to 0.1g and balanced the big side of the rods to 0.1g as well. I replaced my firewall with a sheet of fiberfrax and .016SS and spent a bunch of time lining the cove with SS as well. I also came up with a cool an inexpensive firewall penetration seal using the 1" aluminum flanges from aircraft spruce, firesleave and a couple hose clamps. I had my exhaust ceramic coated and sandblasted, alodined and painted all of the other bits so everything is super clean and tidy now. I put on a sterba 60"D x 68"P prop just to get me through the rest of my modification until I settle on a "forever" prop. I used a little down time at work to make a tool for the spinner and backplate and that turned out super good and my A&P friend who stood with the fire extinguisher at first start said it was the smoothest spinner he's ever seen, sweet! If anybody needs to make a spinner I can mail out the tool. 7 weeks minus 1 day after the incident I got it back in the air and I've got 14 hours on it now . I've been very happy with the performance so far. The engine is turbine smooth (still have to dynamically balance the prop) and my climb performance at altitude has essentially doubled. Down low the performance isn't as significant and I'm thinking it is the prop  being stalled at lower air speeds. It's climb performance increases as I increase speed up to about 150mph indicated down low which seems to be pretty tell tale. I've been trying to keep it cool and at 75% power so not too much time to really feel out performance and efficiency. I did one run the other day up at 10,500ft and performance was a giggle worthy improvement for me. I firewalled the throttle and it stabilized at 2,750rpm with EGT's all within about 30°F of each other. I leaned it out to 90°F ROP and watched the fuel burn go to down to just a bit over 3.6gph with true airspeed holding at 169mph. Previously, I would have been pushing it to get 2500rpm doing 150mph and 5gph. I had a bad EGT player prior to the overhaul that was hurting my fuel burn up high. My CHT's were as you would expect, hot for the first hour but they've come down about 60-80°F now. They're at or below where they used to run. My numbers 2 and 4 cylinders seem to have more oil in them than they should (by seem I mean they do). Doesn't look like they're glazed but if it doesn't improve in 15 more hours I'll probably pull them and re-hone. Other than that I'm really happy with everything. 

One another note, I found (via oil leaks, the prompted inspection) that 3 of the pushrod tubes on the new cylinders were not adequately bead rolled to the heads. I bought a tool and fixed that and then advised Superior that their QA should be keeping an eye on this. They were super responsive and even sent me a check for the cost of the tool and my time. I was impressed by that level of customer service. 


Re: Introduction

Dave Dugas
 

Hi Russell

It’s a great group of aviators who enjoy each other’s company for sure. Hope you will make it next year. Welcome.

Dave D.

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: russellaustin@... [Q-LIST]
Sent: Wednesday, September 25, 2019 12:43 PM
To: Q-LIST@...
Subject: [Q-LIST] Introduction

 

 

Good morning everyone, my name is Russell and I am proud owner of a Dragonfly Mk I. *dodges thrown tomatoes*

N52MT and I have enjoyed each other’s company for the past year. She is equipped with a Great Plains 1835 engine and is equipped for VFR flight. She is a bit portly at 780#, but that’s okay because I know big girls need love too.

I recently attended FOD for the very first time and met the most welcoming, knowledgeable, and fun-loving group I have ever come across. Thank you for allowing me into your close-knit circle. I am truly in awe.

Thanks to Bruce Crain, I got a ride in my very first Q-bird. He has one very polished airplane. It was a treat, and I started searching for an O-200 as soon as I got home.

For anyone who hasn’t been or is on the fence about going, I implore you to make the trek to the middle of the country to visit with these fine folks. This year’s event went extremely smoothly thanks to the efforts of Bruce, Joanne, Imraan and Rachel.

Thanks for opening the group to me. I look forward to being a very passive member in the years to come. ;)

Russell Austin
N52MT

 


Re: My Q is back up

JMasal@...
 

Hey Curcio,

Heckova thorough helpful post you just sent. First on the pilot technique lessons which should be considered by all of us who sometimes rest on our laurels, next on the close inspection of the whole airframe after an incident and lastly on your engine upgrades and resultant performance. Yay!!
You missed an outstanding FOD but we will expect you there next year same place, about the same time.
Details coming.
Thanks for taking the time to write this.
j.


-----Original Message-----
From: Matthew Curcio mlcurcio89@... [Q-LIST]
To: Q-LIST@...
Sent: Wed, Sep 25, 2019 2:28 pm
Subject: [Q-LIST] My Q is back up

 
Hey all, 

My apologies for not being able to make it to FOD - explanation to come. I think at least a few of you know that me and the q bird had a bit of an incident on the way back from OSH. I was pretty conscious of the fact that all of my adventures and 200 hours of time in the 2 months prior to OSH put me in a situation where I was likely on the unhealthy side of the proficiency curve where confidence and complacency become you're greatest enemy. Sure enough it got me. I did a non stop leg from OSH to Rock Springs Wyoming and noticed a good bit of fatigue before landing there. Since there isn't much there I figured I'd make the hour trek to Spanish Fork where I knew I could get a good bite to eat, some caffeine and recuperate a bit and then finish off the final ~3 hrs of the trip. While taxing back to the FBO I cracked my canopy and latched it in the cracked position and then about 10 seconds later I noticed the canopy had come unlatched and was trying to swing open. as I reached up to grab it I swerved off of the taxi way and while I didn't entirely lose control I knew if I forced it back on to the taxi way I would. There were no visible obstacles so I figured I'd just bring it to a stop. Unbeknownst to me, there was a little rut of dirt obscured by some tall grass that grabbed the right main and pulled me around hard to the right 90° and as the left main hit that rut it nosed in and struck the prop.  When it came back down the tail spring broke off. The wheelpants received some damage when it nosed forward as well as the spinner. I arranged a ride to get home that night (from a co-worker who had actually just gotten back from OSH flying Burt's catbird, on the cover of sport av this month). Made the 8 hour drive the next week with a friend and a trailer to bring the airplane home. It was shocking and disappointing but I was very grateful to have repairable damage with minimal structural impact, no physical harm, and close enough to home - especially given how far I had been. 

Human Factors lessons learned. I immediately was kicking myself because this was day two of ground school stuff - don't re-configure while moving and taxi at a brisk walk. I had gotten comfortable taxiing the airplane fast and justified that its wide stance makes it a little more forgiving than something like a pitts for example. The next day I started to realize that I really hadn't done anything differently from the way I normally operate and so I can't kick myself or say what if because I would have done it the same every other day. The problem was really everything. I really sympathize with Mark Patey's accident for this reason. Sure it's easy for the guy who puts 20 hours a year on a 172 to cry foul but we're out here flying hundreds of hours a year to unique placed in very unique experimental with loosely defined operating limits. We built (to some extent) the things and take great pride in them so when you get proficiently proficient it's extremely difficult to know what is "expanding the envelope" vs. reckless and careless operations. What I realized was while I was fatigued that played only a marginal roll. The primary issue was a lack of margin. Sure I can taxi fast and multi task a little 999 times of 1000 (literally) and be fine but the one time where I need a little extra bandwidth I'm not going to have it. It isn't about what the limits are it is about what the margin is on you and your airplanes limits. That is what I learned more than anything and I've changed the way I operate accordingly. I'm happy to have learned that lesson the way I did at this point in my life and aviation experience. 

Lessons learned on the airframe side, this is short. Upon closer inspection I found some additional damage on the fuselage at the lower corners of the canopy cutout. There was a 3.5" crack on both sides of the outer skin running circumferentially. No doubt a failure of the matrix and weave in compression due to the huge load in Z at the tail when it came down. Digging in deaper I found no damage to the core but the inner skin had a compression failure running down along the seat back bulkhead 4" long. I did a burn test and found it was just two plies of glass in that area and the 2 ply tapes wrapping from the bulkhead and down along the wood stringer were just acting as additional stress concentrators. You have a huge discontinuity in the fuselage cross section there, making a huge stress riser and literally nothing was done in the design to provide any relief. I didn't do any math but at least a couple of re-enforcing plies would make a big difference and there is so much bondo in that area it's basically free. This is an area I would advise folks pay close attention to and if you have any cracks in the paint I wouldn't fly until sanding the paint and verifying the matrix and fibers aren't compromised (and then probably put a couple plies down for grandma). 

I spent the following 7 weeks making the structural repairs and overhauling my engine. I sent the ferrous bits over to aircraft specialties and the case to Divco. I was pleased with the prices and turn around I was able to get out of both. Aircraft Specialties did really good work and had very good customer service and status tracking. I would use them again in a heartbeat. I had AS balance the crank while they had it. Divco is Divco but they got it done for me in 13 days, so I can't complain. I bought a new set of superior millenium cylinders, matched the intake elbows to the heads (exhaust side was good) and had lycon flow the heads. I used Lycon's 9:1 pistons. I balanced the pistons, rings, and pins to 0.1g. I also balanced the connecting Rods to 0.1g and balanced the big side of the rods to 0.1g as well. I replaced my firewall with a sheet of fiberfrax and .016SS and spent a bunch of time lining the cove with SS as well. I also came up with a cool an inexpensive firewall penetration seal using the 1" aluminum flanges from aircraft spruce, firesleave and a couple hose clamps. I had my exhaust ceramic coated and sandblasted, alodined and painted all of the other bits so everything is super clean and tidy now. I put on a sterba 60"D x 68"P prop just to get me through the rest of my modification until I settle on a "forever" prop. I used a little down time at work to make a tool for the spinner and backplate and that turned out super good and my A&P friend who stood with the fire extinguisher at first start said it was the smoothest spinner he's ever seen, sweet! If anybody needs to make a spinner I can mail out the tool. 7 weeks minus 1 day after the incident I got it back in the air and I've got 14 hours on it now . I've been very happy with the performance so far. The engine is turbine smooth (still have to dynamically balance the prop) and my climb performance at altitude has essentially doubled. Down low the performance isn't as significant and I'm thinking it is the prop  being stalled at lower air speeds. It's climb performance increases as I increase speed up to about 150mph indicated down low which seems to be pretty tell tale. I've been trying to keep it cool and at 75% power so not too much time to really feel out performance and efficiency. I did one run the other day up at 10,500ft and performance was a giggle worthy improvement for me. I firewalled the throttle and it stabilized at 2,750rpm with EGT's all within about 30°F of each other. I leaned it out to 90°F ROP and watched the fuel burn go to down to just a bit over 3.6gph with true airspeed holding at 169mph. Previously, I would have been pushing it to get 2500rpm doing 150mph and 5gph. I had a bad EGT player prior to the overhaul that was hurting my fuel burn up high. My CHT's were as you would expect, hot for the first hour but they've come down about 60-80°F now. They're at or below where they used to run. My numbers 2 and 4 cylinders seem to have more oil in them than they should (by seem I mean they do). Doesn't look like they're glazed but if it doesn't improve in 15 more hours I'll probably pull them and re-hone. Other than that I'm really happy with everything. 

One another note, I found (via oil leaks, the prompted inspection) that 3 of the pushrod tubes on the new cylinders were not adequately bead rolled to the heads. I bought a tool and fixed that and then advised Superior that their QA should be keeping an eye on this. They were super responsive and even sent me a check for the cost of the tool and my time. I was impressed by that level of customer service. 


Re: My Q is back up

Mike Dwyer
 

You are an animal.  Most people would have taken a year to do all that!

I recently put on 4 new Superiors also.  I was burning 2 hours per quart...  I flew for 10 hours before I dropped the rpm below 2700 at sea level.  30 hours on it and I'm amazed how little oil it is using 15.6 hours per qt.   Those push rod tubes... they get loose by man handling the rubber during installation.  Pretty normal.  Now that you got the tool just put it in a safe place cause in 5 years you'll forget where you put it!

I promise not to touch the canopy latch until fully stopped from now on!  

I'm curious how your oil pressure is when your taxing in with hot oil and <1000 rpm.

Thanks for the warning,
Mike Q200 N3QP 1400 hours.


  


My Q is back up

Matthew Curcio
 

Hey all, 

My apologies for not being able to make it to FOD - explanation to come. I think at least a few of you know that me and the q bird had a bit of an incident on the way back from OSH. I was pretty conscious of the fact that all of my adventures and 200 hours of time in the 2 months prior to OSH put me in a situation where I was likely on the unhealthy side of the proficiency curve where confidence and complacency become you're greatest enemy. Sure enough it got me. I did a non stop leg from OSH to Rock Springs Wyoming and noticed a good bit of fatigue before landing there. Since there isn't much there I figured I'd make the hour trek to Spanish Fork where I knew I could get a good bite to eat, some caffeine and recuperate a bit and then finish off the final ~3 hrs of the trip. While taxing back to the FBO I cracked my canopy and latched it in the cracked position and then about 10 seconds later I noticed the canopy had come unlatched and was trying to swing open. as I reached up to grab it I swerved off of the taxi way and while I didn't entirely lose control I knew if I forced it back on to the taxi way I would. There were no visible obstacles so I figured I'd just bring it to a stop. Unbeknownst to me, there was a little rut of dirt obscured by some tall grass that grabbed the right main and pulled me around hard to the right 90° and as the left main hit that rut it nosed in and struck the prop.  When it came back down the tail spring broke off. The wheelpants received some damage when it nosed forward as well as the spinner. I arranged a ride to get home that night (from a co-worker who had actually just gotten back from OSH flying Burt's catbird, on the cover of sport av this month). Made the 8 hour drive the next week with a friend and a trailer to bring the airplane home. It was shocking and disappointing but I was very grateful to have repairable damage with minimal structural impact, no physical harm, and close enough to home - especially given how far I had been. 

Human Factors lessons learned. I immediately was kicking myself because this was day two of ground school stuff - don't re-configure while moving and taxi at a brisk walk. I had gotten comfortable taxiing the airplane fast and justified that its wide stance makes it a little more forgiving than something like a pitts for example. The next day I started to realize that I really hadn't done anything differently from the way I normally operate and so I can't kick myself or say what if because I would have done it the same every other day. The problem was really everything. I really sympathize with Mark Patey's accident for this reason. Sure it's easy for the guy who puts 20 hours a year on a 172 to cry foul but we're out here flying hundreds of hours a year to unique placed in very unique experimental with loosely defined operating limits. We built (to some extent) the things and take great pride in them so when you get proficiently proficient it's extremely difficult to know what is "expanding the envelope" vs. reckless and careless operations. What I realized was while I was fatigued that played only a marginal roll. The primary issue was a lack of margin. Sure I can taxi fast and multi task a little 999 times of 1000 (literally) and be fine but the one time where I need a little extra bandwidth I'm not going to have it. It isn't about what the limits are it is about what the margin is on you and your airplanes limits. That is what I learned more than anything and I've changed the way I operate accordingly. I'm happy to have learned that lesson the way I did at this point in my life and aviation experience. 

Lessons learned on the airframe side, this is short. Upon closer inspection I found some additional damage on the fuselage at the lower corners of the canopy cutout. There was a 3.5" crack on both sides of the outer skin running circumferentially. No doubt a failure of the matrix and weave in compression due to the huge load in Z at the tail when it came down. Digging in deaper I found no damage to the core but the inner skin had a compression failure running down along the seat back bulkhead 4" long. I did a burn test and found it was just two plies of glass in that area and the 2 ply tapes wrapping from the bulkhead and down along the wood stringer were just acting as additional stress concentrators. You have a huge discontinuity in the fuselage cross section there, making a huge stress riser and literally nothing was done in the design to provide any relief. I didn't do any math but at least a couple of re-enforcing plies would make a big difference and there is so much bondo in that area it's basically free. This is an area I would advise folks pay close attention to and if you have any cracks in the paint I wouldn't fly until sanding the paint and verifying the matrix and fibers aren't compromised (and then probably put a couple plies down for grandma). 

I spent the following 7 weeks making the structural repairs and overhauling my engine. I sent the ferrous bits over to aircraft specialties and the case to Divco. I was pleased with the prices and turn around I was able to get out of both. Aircraft Specialties did really good work and had very good customer service and status tracking. I would use them again in a heartbeat. I had AS balance the crank while they had it. Divco is Divco but they got it done for me in 13 days, so I can't complain. I bought a new set of superior millenium cylinders, matched the intake elbows to the heads (exhaust side was good) and had lycon flow the heads. I used Lycon's 9:1 pistons. I balanced the pistons, rings, and pins to 0.1g. I also balanced the connecting Rods to 0.1g and balanced the big side of the rods to 0.1g as well. I replaced my firewall with a sheet of fiberfrax and .016SS and spent a bunch of time lining the cove with SS as well. I also came up with a cool an inexpensive firewall penetration seal using the 1" aluminum flanges from aircraft spruce, firesleave and a couple hose clamps. I had my exhaust ceramic coated and sandblasted, alodined and painted all of the other bits so everything is super clean and tidy now. I put on a sterba 60"D x 68"P prop just to get me through the rest of my modification until I settle on a "forever" prop. I used a little down time at work to make a tool for the spinner and backplate and that turned out super good and my A&P friend who stood with the fire extinguisher at first start said it was the smoothest spinner he's ever seen, sweet! If anybody needs to make a spinner I can mail out the tool. 7 weeks minus 1 day after the incident I got it back in the air and I've got 14 hours on it now . I've been very happy with the performance so far. The engine is turbine smooth (still have to dynamically balance the prop) and my climb performance at altitude has essentially doubled. Down low the performance isn't as significant and I'm thinking it is the prop  being stalled at lower air speeds. It's climb performance increases as I increase speed up to about 150mph indicated down low which seems to be pretty tell tale. I've been trying to keep it cool and at 75% power so not too much time to really feel out performance and efficiency. I did one run the other day up at 10,500ft and performance was a giggle worthy improvement for me. I firewalled the throttle and it stabilized at 2,750rpm with EGT's all within about 30°F of each other. I leaned it out to 90°F ROP and watched the fuel burn go to down to just a bit over 3.6gph with true airspeed holding at 169mph. Previously, I would have been pushing it to get 2500rpm doing 150mph and 5gph. I had a bad EGT player prior to the overhaul that was hurting my fuel burn up high. My CHT's were as you would expect, hot for the first hour but they've come down about 60-80°F now. They're at or below where they used to run. My numbers 2 and 4 cylinders seem to have more oil in them than they should (by seem I mean they do). Doesn't look like they're glazed but if it doesn't improve in 15 more hours I'll probably pull them and re-hone. Other than that I'm really happy with everything. 

One another note, I found (via oil leaks, the prompted inspection) that 3 of the pushrod tubes on the new cylinders were not adequately bead rolled to the heads. I bought a tool and fixed that and then advised Superior that their QA should be keeping an eye on this. They were super responsive and even sent me a check for the cost of the tool and my time. I was impressed by that level of customer service. 


Re: Introduction

Bruce Crain
 

Thank Russell!  It was out pleasure!  So good to spend the weekend with you! 
Remember, modify and then deny!  Don’t want to experience the wire brushin’ from Jimmeh’
Bruce and bunch


On Sep 25, 2019, at 11:33 AM, Rodney Herzig zzigster@... [Q-LIST] <Q-LIST@...> wrote:

 

Hi Russell,

It was a pleasure meeting you and hope to see you again for many years to come. I fly a Cozy III so I know what it's like to be the odd man out😜 However, this crew is always ready to welcome fellow aviators, experimenters and enthusiasts into the group.

Hope to see you next year,

Rod Herzig
CozyIII N399BR


On Sep 25, 2019, at 12:59 PM, Paul Fisher rv7a.n18pf@... [Q-LIST] <Q-LIST@...> wrote:

 

Hey Russell!  It was great to meet you at the FOD event.  I think you'll fit in nicely to the group.  I'll leave it up to you to decide if that is good or bad!!

Hope to see you again

Paul Fisher
Q-200 N17PF (but weather made me fly RV-7A N18PF!)

On Wed, Sep 25, 2019, 11:43 russellaustin@... [Q-LIST] <Q-LIST@...> wrote:
 

Good morning everyone, my name is Russell and I am proud owner of a Dragonfly Mk I. *dodges thrown tomatoes*

N52MT and I have enjoyed each other’s company for the past year. She is equipped with a Great Plains 1835 engine and is equipped for VFR flight. She is a bit portly at 780#, but that’s okay because I know big girls need love too.

I recently attended FOD for the very first time and met the most welcoming, knowledgeable, and fun-loving group I have ever come across. Thank you for allowing me into your close-knit circle. I am truly in awe.

Thanks to Bruce Crain, I got a ride in my very first Q-bird. He has one very polished airplane. It was a treat, and I started searching for an O-200 as soon as I got home.

For anyone who hasn’t been or is on the fence about going, I implore you to make the trek to the middle of the country to visit with these fine folks. This year’s event went extremely smoothly thanks to the efforts of Bruce, Joanne, Imraan and Rachel.

Thanks for opening the group to me. I look forward to being a very passive member in the years to come. ;)

Russell Austin
N52MT




Re: Introduction

Rodney Herzig
 

Hi Russell,

It was a pleasure meeting you and hope to see you again for many years to come. I fly a Cozy III so I know what it's like to be the odd man out😜 However, this crew is always ready to welcome fellow aviators, experimenters and enthusiasts into the group.

Hope to see you next year,

Rod Herzig
CozyIII N399BR


On Sep 25, 2019, at 12:59 PM, Paul Fisher rv7a.n18pf@... [Q-LIST] <Q-LIST@...> wrote:

 

Hey Russell!  It was great to meet you at the FOD event.  I think you'll fit in nicely to the group.  I'll leave it up to you to decide if that is good or bad!!

Hope to see you again

Paul Fisher
Q-200 N17PF (but weather made me fly RV-7A N18PF!)

On Wed, Sep 25, 2019, 11:43 russellaustin@... [Q-LIST] <Q-LIST@...> wrote:
 

Good morning everyone, my name is Russell and I am proud owner of a Dragonfly Mk I. *dodges thrown tomatoes*

N52MT and I have enjoyed each other’s company for the past year. She is equipped with a Great Plains 1835 engine and is equipped for VFR flight. She is a bit portly at 780#, but that’s okay because I know big girls need love too.

I recently attended FOD for the very first time and met the most welcoming, knowledgeable, and fun-loving group I have ever come across. Thank you for allowing me into your close-knit circle. I am truly in awe.

Thanks to Bruce Crain, I got a ride in my very first Q-bird. He has one very polished airplane. It was a treat, and I started searching for an O-200 as soon as I got home.

For anyone who hasn’t been or is on the fence about going, I implore you to make the trek to the middle of the country to visit with these fine folks. This year’s event went extremely smoothly thanks to the efforts of Bruce, Joanne, Imraan and Rachel.

Thanks for opening the group to me. I look forward to being a very passive member in the years to come. ;)

Russell Austin
N52MT


Re: Introduction

Paul Fisher
 

Hey Russell!  It was great to meet you at the FOD event.  I think you'll fit in nicely to the group.  I'll leave it up to you to decide if that is good or bad!!

Hope to see you again

Paul Fisher
Q-200 N17PF (but weather made me fly RV-7A N18PF!)

On Wed, Sep 25, 2019, 11:43 russellaustin@... [Q-LIST] <Q-LIST@...> wrote:
 

Good morning everyone, my name is Russell and I am proud owner of a Dragonfly Mk I. *dodges thrown tomatoes*

N52MT and I have enjoyed each other’s company for the past year. She is equipped with a Great Plains 1835 engine and is equipped for VFR flight. She is a bit portly at 780#, but that’s okay because I know big girls need love too.

I recently attended FOD for the very first time and met the most welcoming, knowledgeable, and fun-loving group I have ever come across. Thank you for allowing me into your close-knit circle. I am truly in awe.

Thanks to Bruce Crain, I got a ride in my very first Q-bird. He has one very polished airplane. It was a treat, and I started searching for an O-200 as soon as I got home.

For anyone who hasn’t been or is on the fence about going, I implore you to make the trek to the middle of the country to visit with these fine folks. This year’s event went extremely smoothly thanks to the efforts of Bruce, Joanne, Imraan and Rachel.

Thanks for opening the group to me. I look forward to being a very passive member in the years to come. ;)

Russell Austin
N52MT


Re: Introduction

Jay Scheevel
 

Welcome to the flock, Russell. It was a pleasure to meet you. Best of luck with your project and keep us posted. Check in with Charlie and Bob Johnson for the latest on the dragonfly group goings on. Charlie, in particular, monitors both channels for Q's and D-fly's.

Cheers,
Jay Scheevel, Tri-Q2 N8WQ


Re: Introduction

Corbin
 

Welcome!!

Is there a list of where we are all located?

Corbin

On Sep 25, 2019, at 11:43 AM, russellaustin@... [Q-LIST] wrote:

  

Good morning everyone, my name is Russell and I am proud owner of a Dragonfly Mk I. *dodges thrown tomatoes*

N52MT and I have enjoyed each other’s company for the past year. She is equipped with a Great Plains 1835 engine and is equipped for VFR flight. She is a bit portly at 780#, but that’s okay because I know big girls need love too.

I recently attended FOD for the very first time and met the most welcoming, knowledgeable, and fun-loving group I have ever come across. Thank you for allowing me into your close-knit circle. I am truly in awe.

Thanks to Bruce Crain, I got a ride in my very first Q-bird. He has one very polished airplane. It was a treat, and I started searching for an O-200 as soon as I got home.

For anyone who hasn’t been or is on the fence about going, I implore you to make the trek to the middle of the country to visit with these fine folks. This year’s event went extremely smoothly thanks to the efforts of Bruce, Joanne, Imraan and Rachel.

Thanks for opening the group to me. I look forward to being a very passive member in the years to come. ;)

Russell Austin
N52MT


Introduction

Dragonfly Russell
 

Good morning everyone, my name is Russell and I am proud owner of a Dragonfly Mk I. *dodges thrown tomatoes*

N52MT and I have enjoyed each other’s company for the past year. She is equipped with a Great Plains 1835 engine and is equipped for VFR flight. She is a bit portly at 780#, but that’s okay because I know big girls need love too.

I recently attended FOD for the very first time and met the most welcoming, knowledgeable, and fun-loving group I have ever come across. Thank you for allowing me into your close-knit circle. I am truly in awe.

Thanks to Bruce Crain, I got a ride in my very first Q-bird. He has one very polished airplane. It was a treat, and I started searching for an O-200 as soon as I got home.

For anyone who hasn’t been or is on the fence about going, I implore you to make the trek to the middle of the country to visit with these fine folks. This year’s event went extremely smoothly thanks to the efforts of Bruce, Joanne, Imraan and Rachel.

Thanks for opening the group to me. I look forward to being a very passive member in the years to come. ;)

Russell Austin
N52MT


Re: N8WQ interior paint

Jay Scheevel
 

I used those FAA flammability resistant fabrics on my interior, courtesy of a friend that worked in a lear jet shop that was clearing out old fabric designs. I do have bare paint on some of the interior though. You cant win 'em all, I guess.

Jay


Re: N8WQ interior paint

Matthew Curcio
 

Not to mention, if you’ve ever done a burnt test on a sample of glass off your plane, the resin is super flammable as well. I did make sure to use materials that met the FAA’s requirements for burn testing when I did my interior but fires are bad, period.

Matthew Curcio
419-290-3773


On Sep 25, 2019, at 08:41, Sam Hoskins sam.hoskins@... [Q-LIST] <Q-LIST@...> wrote:

 

You're sitting on a gas tank. I'd say you're already inside the tinderbox. 

On Tue, Sep 24, 2019, 10:09 PM john.hartley1@... [Q-LIST] <Q-LIST@...> wrote:
 

How about flammability of this setup? I'm not familiar with the materials but it seems you could be setting in a tinderbox. A pretty tinderbox.
John


Re: N8WQ interior paint

Jay Scheevel
 

Good point, Sammy!

Cheers,
Jay


Re: N8WQ interior paint

Sam Hoskins
 

You're sitting on a gas tank. I'd say you're already inside the tinderbox. 


On Tue, Sep 24, 2019, 10:09 PM john.hartley1@... [Q-LIST] <Q-LIST@...> wrote:
 

How about flammability of this setup? I'm not familiar with the materials but it seems you could be setting in a tinderbox. A pretty tinderbox.
John

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