Date   
Re: Q2 to to Q200

Joe Hood
 

All inclusive at 185, or adds for radiator and speed reduction drive?

On Tue, Mar 10, 2020 at 10:22 Jay Scheevel <jay@...> wrote:

There have been several Jabiru 3300 engines installed in quickies. Two successfully completed and flown in the US that I am aware of. One is mine, the other was Paul Spackman’s he has since sold his, but I think he put close to 1000 hours on it and he had the GU canard. I have less than 100 on mine, so far. The J3300 engine engine weighs 185 pounds and is 120 hp at sea level at 3300 rpm. It is happier running at a lower rpm’s so think of it as an O-200 equivalent (same power at the same rpm’s as the O-200). The newest version of the Jab (Gen4) has been quite reliable with a change to all aluminum cylinder assemblies (nikosil lined).  

 

Also, Richard K would be happy to sell you a UL engine.

 

Cheers,

Jay

 

From: main@Q-List.groups.io <main@Q-List.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Larick
Sent: Tuesday, March 10, 2020 7:26 AM
To: main@Q-List.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Q-List] Q2 to to Q200

 

Thank you all.  Summary
Q2 to Q200:
Engine mounts
firewall mod or replace
cowling change
counter weights for controls
Weight/Balance

generally for GU Canard add VG’s

Re: Q2 to to Q200

Jay Scheevel
 

There have been several Jabiru 3300 engines installed in quickies. Two successfully completed and flown in the US that I am aware of. One is mine, the other was Paul Spackman’s he has since sold his, but I think he put close to 1000 hours on it and he had the GU canard. I have less than 100 on mine, so far. The J3300 engine engine weighs 185 pounds and is 120 hp at sea level at 3300 rpm. It is happier running at a lower rpm’s so think of it as an O-200 equivalent (same power at the same rpm’s as the O-200). The newest version of the Jab (Gen4) has been quite reliable with a change to all aluminum cylinder assemblies (nikosil lined).  

 

Also, Richard K would be happy to sell you a UL engine.

 

Cheers,

Jay

 

From: main@Q-List.groups.io <main@Q-List.groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Larick
Sent: Tuesday, March 10, 2020 7:26 AM
To: main@Q-List.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Q-List] Q2 to to Q200

 

Thank you all.  Summary
Q2 to Q200:
Engine mounts
firewall mod or replace
cowling change
counter weights for controls
Weight/Balance

generally for GU Canard add VG’s

Re: Q2 to to Q200

Brian Larick
 

Thank you all.  Summary
Q2 to Q200:
Engine mounts
firewall mod or replace
cowling change
counter weights for controls
Weight/Balance

generally for GU Canard add VG’s

Re: Q2 to to Q200

One Sky Dog
 

My HAPI 1835cc firewall forward was 189 lbs if I recall correctly. I think a fully dressed O-200 is closer to 250 lbs but I have not weighed one. Plus whatever counter balance to get the CG right.

I do not own a Q but I have sort of done what you are considering. My Dragonfly weighed 778 lbs with the HAPI 1835cc, cruised at 125 mph, flat out on a good day 140 mph, burning 4 gal per hr (50 hp) average. After going through 2 engines in 800 hrs I decided to go for something a little more reliable. I chose a Corvair engine for a variety of reasons but it is very close to the weight of an O-200 and puts out 100 hp at 3500 rpm.

After the conversion, second fuel tank to feed the thirstier engine, bigger battery moved under rear wing for CG correction the plane weighs 950 lbs. With the 60 lb increase in engine weight the CG moved beyond the forward limit. To keep my 200 to 250 mile range another gas tank behind the seat and plumbing plus the bigger battery and cables added 111 lbs to get the CG back in the envelope.

So far I have been burning 5-6 gal per hour climb rate improved a lot, top speed so far low over the Bonneville salt flats 4500 MSL 154 mph I have a range of over 300 miles.

Consider the R-2300 redundant ignition and dynamos built in and 80 hp  continuous with the Revmaster heads. 20 hp does not offset 50 plus pounds or the time to modify the airframe in my opinion. It will be a long road to go from VW block to O-200 engine.

On Mar 9, 2020, at 8:18 PM, Joe Hood <joe.hood@...> wrote:


Weight different between the Revmaster and O-200 170 vs 200?

On Wed, Feb 26, 2020 at 11:31 AM Martin Skiby <mskiby@...> wrote:
Yes what Richard said.

No need for an LS Canard.  But there is a need to counter balance all control surfaces if not already done.


-----------------------------------------

From: "Richard Kaczmarek 3RD"
To: main@q-list.groups.io
Cc:
Sent: Wednesday February 26 2020 8:04:06AM
Subject: Re: [Q-List] Q2 to to Q200

1. New engine mounts 
2. A modification to the firewall 
3. A longer cowling 
Some will argue that is you don't have the LS1 canard you need to have it but but that just isn't true.

Richard 

Re: Q2 to to Q200

Richard Kaczmarek 3RD
 

184lbs vs 240lbs and 30hp


On Mon, Mar 9, 2020, 11:18 PM Joe Hood <joe.hood@...> wrote:
Weight different between the Revmaster and O-200 170 vs 200?

On Wed, Feb 26, 2020 at 11:31 AM Martin Skiby <mskiby@...> wrote:
Yes what Richard said.

No need for an LS Canard.  But there is a need to counter balance all control surfaces if not already done.


-----------------------------------------

From: "Richard Kaczmarek 3RD"
To: main@q-list.groups.io
Cc:
Sent: Wednesday February 26 2020 8:04:06AM
Subject: Re: [Q-List] Q2 to to Q200

1. New engine mounts 
2. A modification to the firewall 
3. A longer cowling 
Some will argue that is you don't have the LS1 canard you need to have it but but that just isn't true.

Richard 

Re: Q2 to to Q200

Joe Hood
 

Weight different between the Revmaster and O-200 170 vs 200?


On Wed, Feb 26, 2020 at 11:31 AM Martin Skiby <mskiby@...> wrote:
Yes what Richard said.

No need for an LS Canard.  But there is a need to counter balance all control surfaces if not already done.


-----------------------------------------

From: "Richard Kaczmarek 3RD"
To: main@q-list.groups.io
Cc:
Sent: Wednesday February 26 2020 8:04:06AM
Subject: Re: [Q-List] Q2 to to Q200

1. New engine mounts 
2. A modification to the firewall 
3. A longer cowling 
Some will argue that is you don't have the LS1 canard you need to have it but but that just isn't true.

Richard 

Tri-Q Project For Sale Denton, TX

Dave A
 

Hello everyone,

Sam Hoskins invites me to repost this ad here in the group.

I am selling a fairly (if not completely) complete Tri-Q project.  I haven’t done a detailed inventory, but it looks to be all here.  I was going to build it myself but there’s no way I can fit anyone in there with me, and a single seater isn’t in the cards.  $3500 takes it all.

it’s located in my hanger at the Denton, TX airport (KDTO).

Dave Anderson

Re: Jerry come lately

John Hoxie
 

All,
To get back into flying with confidence, I bought a couple Kasperwing ultralights. I didn't realize until I drove 1600 miles to pick them up, that they are going to take some work. I got a corner of a large hangar for them. One cage on floats. A lot of canyons around here to explore and a lake & river my sister has a place onin North Idaho. Been going there nearly every summer my whole life hoping to fly it some day. In the process, I bought an enclosed trailer that my Q2 with engine off will fit into. Kwings fit also. I need to make a dolly to fit the Q2 at the right attitude for the trailer. Note the bent header ram-air tube. Happwned tears ago turning the plane over for first time after installing the tube. Anyone know the easiest way to c


hange it?







On Mon, Mar 9, 2020 at 2:23 PM, Jerry Gmail
<jerrylm1986@...> wrote:
I did. Interviewed 3 people who used it. None of them successful after 3 years. Wound up getting replacements. Another downer, insurance doesn't cover.

On Mon, Mar 9, 2020, 3:38 PM albert jolliffe <ajolliffe50@...> wrote:
You should have looked into stem cell implant .friend of mine had it worked good although it took 9 months to compleat . 


On Mar 8, 2020, at 5:50 PM, Mike Dwyer <q200pilot@...> wrote:

Good report Jerry.  Reminds me that we are getting old!  
Not much from me lately as they are repaving a couple of runways at our airport and it's a terrible mess... So I bought a fixer upper boat!
Never learn!
Mike Dwyer

YouTube Videos: https://goo.gl/yKEHfK
Q200 Website: http://goo.gl/V8IrJF


On Sun, Mar 8, 2020 at 5:18 PM Jerry Marstall <jnmarstall@...> wrote:

I am slow on the trigger, but today I experienced my first flight of the year.  There are legitimate reasons – so I believe.

 

June 19, 2019, I had my left knee replaced.  That grounded me for tooooo long.  I did get a chance to fly twice at the end of October before having my right knee replaced on November 4.  That likewise kept me out of the air until today.  Actually, I could have flown a little earlier, but in between the two knee surgeries I somehow came up with a hernia.  That delayed my flying for another 4 weeks.  Not so much that I couldn’t fly during the hernia recovery, the doctor was concerned about the force required to push the tail down and spin the plane around to then push it uphill out of the hangar.  Guess I should not have described that part to him.

 

Fortunately, Nancy took me for a couple of rides over the last two weeks to familiarize me with the art of flying.  Today was the perfect day.  CAVU and calm.  As in the past, I found that muscle memory carried me through the flying maneuvers, but I really lose familiarity with the cockpit.

I know what I want to look at, but I can’t seem to find it on the instrument panel.  No matter how much broomstick flying I do in the cockpit before a flight after a long layoff, I still have trouble finding the instrument I want to scan.  I know it isn’t old-age because I have always had this problem.  Fortunately, after a few minutes in the air, the instruments seem to relocate themselves to where I remember them being.

 

Anyway, I had my first flight of 2020 and it quickly reminded me of why we love this little airplane so much.  Worth every minute of construction time required to get one completed (if they ever are REALLY completed) and airborne.  For those still building, DON”T STOP.  Doing so will only cause you great lament in the future.

 

Wishing you all a great flying season.  Hope we can all get to Spring Fling and Field of Dreams!!

Jerry Marstall

Asheville, NC

Tri-Q200

900 hrs.

Re: Jerry come lately

Jerry Gmail
 

I did. Interviewed 3 people who used it. None of them successful after 3 years. Wound up getting replacements. Another downer, insurance doesn't cover.


On Mon, Mar 9, 2020, 3:38 PM albert jolliffe <ajolliffe50@...> wrote:
You should have looked into stem cell implant .friend of mine had it worked good although it took 9 months to compleat . 


On Mar 8, 2020, at 5:50 PM, Mike Dwyer <q200pilot@...> wrote:

Good report Jerry.  Reminds me that we are getting old!  
Not much from me lately as they are repaving a couple of runways at our airport and it's a terrible mess... So I bought a fixer upper boat!
Never learn!
Mike Dwyer

YouTube Videos: https://goo.gl/yKEHfK
Q200 Website: http://goo.gl/V8IrJF


On Sun, Mar 8, 2020 at 5:18 PM Jerry Marstall <jnmarstall@...> wrote:

I am slow on the trigger, but today I experienced my first flight of the year.  There are legitimate reasons – so I believe.

 

June 19, 2019, I had my left knee replaced.  That grounded me for tooooo long.  I did get a chance to fly twice at the end of October before having my right knee replaced on November 4.  That likewise kept me out of the air until today.  Actually, I could have flown a little earlier, but in between the two knee surgeries I somehow came up with a hernia.  That delayed my flying for another 4 weeks.  Not so much that I couldn’t fly during the hernia recovery, the doctor was concerned about the force required to push the tail down and spin the plane around to then push it uphill out of the hangar.  Guess I should not have described that part to him.

 

Fortunately, Nancy took me for a couple of rides over the last two weeks to familiarize me with the art of flying.  Today was the perfect day.  CAVU and calm.  As in the past, I found that muscle memory carried me through the flying maneuvers, but I really lose familiarity with the cockpit.

I know what I want to look at, but I can’t seem to find it on the instrument panel.  No matter how much broomstick flying I do in the cockpit before a flight after a long layoff, I still have trouble finding the instrument I want to scan.  I know it isn’t old-age because I have always had this problem.  Fortunately, after a few minutes in the air, the instruments seem to relocate themselves to where I remember them being.

 

Anyway, I had my first flight of 2020 and it quickly reminded me of why we love this little airplane so much.  Worth every minute of construction time required to get one completed (if they ever are REALLY completed) and airborne.  For those still building, DON”T STOP.  Doing so will only cause you great lament in the future.

 

Wishing you all a great flying season.  Hope we can all get to Spring Fling and Field of Dreams!!

Jerry Marstall

Asheville, NC

Tri-Q200

900 hrs.

Re: Jerry come lately

albert jolliffe
 

You should have looked into stem cell implant .friend of mine had it worked good although it took 9 months to compleat . 


On Mar 8, 2020, at 5:50 PM, Mike Dwyer <q200pilot@...> wrote:

Good report Jerry.  Reminds me that we are getting old!  
Not much from me lately as they are repaving a couple of runways at our airport and it's a terrible mess... So I bought a fixer upper boat!
Never learn!
Mike Dwyer

YouTube Videos: https://goo.gl/yKEHfK
Q200 Website: http://goo.gl/V8IrJF


On Sun, Mar 8, 2020 at 5:18 PM Jerry Marstall <jnmarstall@...> wrote:

I am slow on the trigger, but today I experienced my first flight of the year.  There are legitimate reasons – so I believe.

 

June 19, 2019, I had my left knee replaced.  That grounded me for tooooo long.  I did get a chance to fly twice at the end of October before having my right knee replaced on November 4.  That likewise kept me out of the air until today.  Actually, I could have flown a little earlier, but in between the two knee surgeries I somehow came up with a hernia.  That delayed my flying for another 4 weeks.  Not so much that I couldn’t fly during the hernia recovery, the doctor was concerned about the force required to push the tail down and spin the plane around to then push it uphill out of the hangar.  Guess I should not have described that part to him.

 

Fortunately, Nancy took me for a couple of rides over the last two weeks to familiarize me with the art of flying.  Today was the perfect day.  CAVU and calm.  As in the past, I found that muscle memory carried me through the flying maneuvers, but I really lose familiarity with the cockpit.

I know what I want to look at, but I can’t seem to find it on the instrument panel.  No matter how much broomstick flying I do in the cockpit before a flight after a long layoff, I still have trouble finding the instrument I want to scan.  I know it isn’t old-age because I have always had this problem.  Fortunately, after a few minutes in the air, the instruments seem to relocate themselves to where I remember them being.

 

Anyway, I had my first flight of 2020 and it quickly reminded me of why we love this little airplane so much.  Worth every minute of construction time required to get one completed (if they ever are REALLY completed) and airborne.  For those still building, DON”T STOP.  Doing so will only cause you great lament in the future.

 

Wishing you all a great flying season.  Hope we can all get to Spring Fling and Field of Dreams!!

Jerry Marstall

Asheville, NC

Tri-Q200

900 hrs.

Re: I'm flying as well

Matthew Curcio
 

Sam - funny you should mention that about the tower recognizing you. I’ve got the same thing going at John Wayne airport in Orange County. It’s pretty funny amongst the constant stream of a320’s, 737’s and bizjets going in there they recognize me. One controller will make a point to say “have a nice day Matt” before handing me off to ground - def a cool feeling. Anymore approach even does too. This last weekend I called up approach out of special flight rules over LAX and the controller already new my type and Asked if I was going to John Wayne before I said anything. I think with a memorable tail number and ADSB she ready and waiting. It’s a lot of fun feeling like more than a visitor in the system.

Now I’ve just got to figure out my cylinder break in problems and ADSB good chance I’m going to pull off my jugs tonight, for a 3rd (since my overhaul in September), and take them over to Kenny at Lycon in Visalia to see what he has to say tomorrow. I have some issues with his pistons and lack of documentation :/ 

Matthew Curcio
419-290-3773


On Mar 9, 2020, at 10:57, Sam Hoskins <sam.hoskins@...> wrote:

I may as well post a bit myself. Last fall I replaced my #1 cylinder (I recently wrote about it here). The wife and I took a couple of months off in the Winnebago and recently got back into town. At this point I'm still breaking in the cylinder, so I'm not traveling very far. This past Thursday I got another 1.4 hours flying in circles around southern Illinois and it ran smoothly.

One funny thing, KMDH is the 4th busiest airport in the state with 250 operations a day, because of all the student flight training. The tower is very professional and contribute greatly to the flight students learning how to properly interact with ATC. Because of the air races I have hosted, it turns out I am now on a first name basis with one of the controllers.

"Southern ground, Quickie 202 Sierra Hotel at the T-hangers with taxi Foxtrot, west departure".
"Quickie 202 Sierra Hotel, how you doing Sam?"
"Good Larry How about yourself?"

later

"Quickie 202 Sierra Hotel ready at 36L".
"Quickie 202 Sierra Hotel, cleared for departure.  Have a good trip, Buddy".

Makes me smile.

I'm flying as well

Sam Hoskins
 

I may as well post a bit myself. Last fall I replaced my #1 cylinder (I recently wrote about it here). The wife and I took a couple of months off in the Winnebago and recently got back into town. At this point I'm still breaking in the cylinder, so I'm not traveling very far. This past Thursday I got another 1.4 hours flying in circles around southern Illinois and it ran smoothly.

One funny thing, KMDH is the 4th busiest airport in the state with 250 operations a day, because of all the student flight training. The tower is very professional and contribute greatly to the flight students learning how to properly interact with ATC. Because of the air races I have hosted, it turns out I am now on a first name basis with one of the controllers.

"Southern ground, Quickie 202 Sierra Hotel at the T-hangers with taxi Foxtrot, west departure".
"Quickie 202 Sierra Hotel, how you doing Sam?"
"Good Larry How about yourself?"

later

"Quickie 202 Sierra Hotel ready at 36L".
"Quickie 202 Sierra Hotel, cleared for departure.  Have a good trip, Buddy".

Makes me smile.

Re: Spring Fling

Jay Scheevel
 

Hi Kevin,

 

Hope I can make it this year. I have never landed that at that LOW an elevation in my Q.

 

Cheers,

Jay

 

From: main@Q-List.groups.io <main@Q-List.groups.io> On Behalf Of Kevin Boddicker
Sent: Sunday, March 08, 2020 6:54 PM
To: main@Q-List.groups.io
Subject: [Q-List] Spring Fling

 

Nice report Jerry. I changed the subject line for the obvious reason.

 

Spring Fling Will be May 15,16,17. The only weekend even close to open. 

10th is Mothers Day.

25th is Memorial Day.

Don’t worry, no-one will have to show up, as it always rains. 

However I will be there rain or shine.

Be a chance for you to land 1187 feet above seal level. Mike Dwyer.

Hope all will attend. The group has been fairly quiet. Hope this excites everyone to at least consider flying to KDEH.

 

See you then if not before!!

 

 

Kevin Boddicker
TriQ 200 N7868B  500  hrs
Luana, IA.





On Mar 8, 2020, at 4:18 PM, Jerry Marstall <jnmarstall@...> wrote:

 

I am slow on the trigger, but today I experienced my first flight of the year.  There are legitimate reasons – so I believe.

 

June 19, 2019, I had my left knee replaced.  That grounded me for tooooo long.  I did get a chance to fly twice at the end of October before having my right knee replaced on November 4.  That likewise kept me out of the air until today.  Actually, I could have flown a little earlier, but in between the two knee surgeries I somehow came up with a hernia.  That delayed my flying for another 4 weeks.  Not so much that I couldn’t fly during the hernia recovery, the doctor was concerned about the force required to push the tail down and spin the plane around to then push it uphill out of the hangar.  Guess I should not have described that part to him.

 

Fortunately, Nancy took me for a couple of rides over the last two weeks to familiarize me with the art of flying.  Today was the perfect day.  CAVU and calm.  As in the past, I found that muscle memory carried me through the flying maneuvers, but I really lose familiarity with the cockpit. 

I know what I want to look at, but I can’t seem to find it on the instrument panel.  No matter how much broomstick flying I do in the cockpit before a flight after a long layoff, I still have trouble finding the instrument I want to scan.  I know it isn’t old-age because I have always had this problem.  Fortunately, after a few minutes in the air, the instruments seem to relocate themselves to where I remember them being.

 

Anyway, I had my first flight of 2020 and it quickly reminded me of why we love this little airplane so much.  Worth every minute of construction time required to get one completed (if they ever are REALLY completed) and airborne.  For those still building, DON”T STOP.  Doing so will only cause you great lament in the future.

 

Wishing you all a great flying season.  Hope we can all get to Spring Fling and Field of Dreams!!

Jerry Marstall

Asheville, NC

Tri-Q200

900 hrs.

 

Re: Jerry come lately

Jon Matcho
 

Jerry,

 

Thank you for sharing.  I am glad to hear you are healthy and flying again.  Thanks for the motivation.

 

Best regards,

Jon

 

 

Jon Matcho

 

jonmatcho@...

Repairing Quickie TriQ-200

Building a Cozy Mark IV

www.canardzone.com

www.quickheads.com

 

Re: Jerry come lately

Bruce Crain
 

Great to have you back oh fearless and learned "Potentate"!  I have already flown the TriQ this winter but put it up to tour Fredericksburg and Conroe Texas in the RV6. Went to the Pacific War Museum and the Nimitz museum.  Wonderful displays!  Highly recommended. Tail winds all the way around!  Ground speeds of 190+ all 3 ways!  I am afraid I am getting an attitude from Honey Lamb that says I kinda like this RV thingy.  Mostly luggage.
It is getting warmer here in Oklahoma so I won't have an excuse for not working on the airplanes.  Need to pull a cylinder to check for an oil leak and a few other things.
Bruce Crain


---------- Original Message ----------
From: "Jerry Marstall" <jnmarstall@...>
To: "Q-email list" <main@Q-list.groups.io>
Subject: [Q-List] Jerry come lately
Date: Sun, 8 Mar 2020 17:18:26 -0400

I am slow on the trigger, but today I experienced my first flight of the year.  There are legitimate reasons – so I believe.

 

June 19, 2019, I had my left knee replaced.  That grounded me for tooooo long.  I did get a chance to fly twice at the end of October before having my right knee replaced on November 4.  That likewise kept me out of the air until today.  Actually, I could have flown a little earlier, but in between the two knee surgeries I somehow came up with a hernia.  That delayed my flying for another 4 weeks.  Not so much that I couldn’t fly during the hernia recovery, the doctor was concerned about the force required to push the tail down and spin the plane around to then push it uphill out of the hangar.  Guess I should not have described that part to him.

 

Fortunately, Nancy took me for a couple of rides over the last two weeks to familiarize me with the art of flying.  Today was the perfect day.  CAVU and calm.  As in the past, I found that muscle memory carried me through the flying maneuvers, but I really lose familiarity with the cockpit.

I know what I want to look at, but I can’t seem to find it on the instrument panel.  No matter how much broomstick flying I do in the cockpit before a flight after a long layoff, I still have trouble finding the instrument I want to scan.  I know it isn’t old-age because I have always had this problem.  Fortunately, after a few minutes in the air, the instruments seem to relocate themselves to where I remember them being.

 

Anyway, I had my first flight of 2020 and it quickly reminded me of why we love this little airplane so much.  Worth every minute of construction time required to get one completed (if they ever are REALLY completed) and airborne.  For those still building, DON”T STOP.  Doing so will only cause you great lament in the future.

 

Wishing you all a great flying season.  Hope we can all get to Spring Fling and Field of Dreams!!

Jerry Marstall

Asheville, NC

Tri-Q200

900 hrs.



Re: Jerry come lately

Jerry Marstall
 

Thx Jay. It's great that you are still experimenting.  Isn't it fun!

-------- Original message --------
From: Jay Scheevel <jay@...>
Date: 3/8/20 8:21 PM (GMT-05:00)
To: main@Q-List.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Q-List] Jerry come lately

Great report, Jerry!

So glad you are back in the air in your beautiful little bird. Better yet to hear you are all healed up (or at least mostly).

Still working on installing elevator trim, so I can "balance" the reflexor trim and the elevator trim for best effect depending on cg. More on that once I get it in the air.

Cheers,
Jay

Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID


Jerry Marstall <jnmarstall@...> wrote:

I am slow on the trigger, but today I experienced my first flight of the year.  There are legitimate reasons – so I believe.

 

June 19, 2019, I had my left knee replaced.  That grounded me for tooooo long.  I did get a chance to fly twice at the end of October before having my right knee replaced on November 4.  That likewise kept me out of the air until today.  Actually, I could have flown a little earlier, but in between the two knee surgeries I somehow came up with a hernia.  That delayed my flying for another 4 weeks.  Not so much that I couldn’t fly during the hernia recovery, the doctor was concerned about the force required to push the tail down and spin the plane around to then push it uphill out of the hangar.  Guess I should not have described that part to him.

 

Fortunately, Nancy took me for a couple of rides over the last two weeks to familiarize me with the art of flying.  Today was the perfect day.  CAVU and calm.  As in the past, I found that muscle memory carried me through the flying maneuvers, but I really lose familiarity with the cockpit.

I know what I want to look at, but I can’t seem to find it on the instrument panel.  No matter how much broomstick flying I do in the cockpit before a flight after a long layoff, I still have trouble finding the instrument I want to scan.  I know it isn’t old-age because I have always had this problem.  Fortunately, after a few minutes in the air, the instruments seem to relocate themselves to where I remember them being.

 

Anyway, I had my first flight of 2020 and it quickly reminded me of why we love this little airplane so much.  Worth every minute of construction time required to get one completed (if they ever are REALLY completed) and airborne.  For those still building, DON”T STOP.  Doing so will only cause you great lament in the future.

 

Wishing you all a great flying season.  Hope we can all get to Spring Fling and Field of Dreams!!

Jerry Marstall

Asheville, NC

Tri-Q200

900 hrs.

Re: Jerry come lately

Jim Patillo
 

Hey Jerry,

Good to hear you are doing much better. I still fly every week but if I’m out of the Q for a a couple of weeks for maintenance, other airplanes or whatever, it takes a few  minutes to reorient. I think you’re perfectly fine for our ripe old ages. I believe learned motor skills tend to remain intact and are more readily accessible than visual or audible cues for some reason.

I still play my trumpet and the cat isn’t screeching.  I was in the marching band. Go Razorbacks! The fingers know what to do even if the lips don’t  Ha ha!

Glad to hear your flying again! 

P.S. Jerry is right, you will never regret building and flying but you will always regret not. Build on!

Jim
N46JP - Q200






Spring Fling

Kevin Boddicker
 

Nice report Jerry. I changed the subject line for the obvious reason.

Spring Fling Will be May 15,16,17. The only weekend even close to open. 
10th is Mothers Day.
25th is Memorial Day.
Don’t worry, no-one will have to show up, as it always rains. 
However I will be there rain or shine.
Be a chance for you to land 1187 feet above seal level. Mike Dwyer.
Hope all will attend. The group has been fairly quiet. Hope this excites everyone to at least consider flying to KDEH.

See you then if not before!!


Kevin Boddicker
TriQ 200 N7868B  500  hrs
Luana, IA.



On Mar 8, 2020, at 4:18 PM, Jerry Marstall <jnmarstall@...> wrote:

I am slow on the trigger, but today I experienced my first flight of the year.  There are legitimate reasons – so I believe.
 
June 19, 2019, I had my left knee replaced.  That grounded me for tooooo long.  I did get a chance to fly twice at the end of October before having my right knee replaced on November 4.  That likewise kept me out of the air until today.  Actually, I could have flown a little earlier, but in between the two knee surgeries I somehow came up with a hernia.  That delayed my flying for another 4 weeks.  Not so much that I couldn’t fly during the hernia recovery, the doctor was concerned about the force required to push the tail down and spin the plane around to then push it uphill out of the hangar.  Guess I should not have described that part to him.
 
Fortunately, Nancy took me for a couple of rides over the last two weeks to familiarize me with the art of flying.  Today was the perfect day.  CAVU and calm.  As in the past, I found that muscle memory carried me through the flying maneuvers, but I really lose familiarity with the cockpit. 
I know what I want to look at, but I can’t seem to find it on the instrument panel.  No matter how much broomstick flying I do in the cockpit before a flight after a long layoff, I still have trouble finding the instrument I want to scan.  I know it isn’t old-age because I have always had this problem.  Fortunately, after a few minutes in the air, the instruments seem to relocate themselves to where I remember them being.
 
Anyway, I had my first flight of 2020 and it quickly reminded me of why we love this little airplane so much.  Worth every minute of construction time required to get one completed (if they ever are REALLY completed) and airborne.  For those still building, DON”T STOP.  Doing so will only cause you great lament in the future.
 
Wishing you all a great flying season.  Hope we can all get to Spring Fling and Field of Dreams!!
Jerry Marstall
Asheville, NC
Tri-Q200
900 hrs.

Re: Jerry come lately

Jay Scheevel
 

Great report, Jerry!

So glad you are back in the air in your beautiful little bird. Better yet to hear you are all healed up (or at least mostly).

Still working on installing elevator trim, so I can "balance" the reflexor trim and the elevator trim for best effect depending on cg. More on that once I get it in the air.

Cheers,
Jay

Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID


Jerry Marstall <jnmarstall@...> wrote:

I am slow on the trigger, but today I experienced my first flight of the year.  There are legitimate reasons – so I believe.

 

June 19, 2019, I had my left knee replaced.  That grounded me for tooooo long.  I did get a chance to fly twice at the end of October before having my right knee replaced on November 4.  That likewise kept me out of the air until today.  Actually, I could have flown a little earlier, but in between the two knee surgeries I somehow came up with a hernia.  That delayed my flying for another 4 weeks.  Not so much that I couldn’t fly during the hernia recovery, the doctor was concerned about the force required to push the tail down and spin the plane around to then push it uphill out of the hangar.  Guess I should not have described that part to him.

 

Fortunately, Nancy took me for a couple of rides over the last two weeks to familiarize me with the art of flying.  Today was the perfect day.  CAVU and calm.  As in the past, I found that muscle memory carried me through the flying maneuvers, but I really lose familiarity with the cockpit.

I know what I want to look at, but I can’t seem to find it on the instrument panel.  No matter how much broomstick flying I do in the cockpit before a flight after a long layoff, I still have trouble finding the instrument I want to scan.  I know it isn’t old-age because I have always had this problem.  Fortunately, after a few minutes in the air, the instruments seem to relocate themselves to where I remember them being.

 

Anyway, I had my first flight of 2020 and it quickly reminded me of why we love this little airplane so much.  Worth every minute of construction time required to get one completed (if they ever are REALLY completed) and airborne.  For those still building, DON”T STOP.  Doing so will only cause you great lament in the future.

 

Wishing you all a great flying season.  Hope we can all get to Spring Fling and Field of Dreams!!

Jerry Marstall

Asheville, NC

Tri-Q200

900 hrs.

Re: Jerry come lately

Mike Dwyer
 

Good report Jerry.  Reminds me that we are getting old!  
Not much from me lately as they are repaving a couple of runways at our airport and it's a terrible mess... So I bought a fixer upper boat!
Never learn!
Mike Dwyer

YouTube Videos: https://goo.gl/yKEHfK
Q200 Website: http://goo.gl/V8IrJF


On Sun, Mar 8, 2020 at 5:18 PM Jerry Marstall <jnmarstall@...> wrote:

I am slow on the trigger, but today I experienced my first flight of the year.  There are legitimate reasons – so I believe.

 

June 19, 2019, I had my left knee replaced.  That grounded me for tooooo long.  I did get a chance to fly twice at the end of October before having my right knee replaced on November 4.  That likewise kept me out of the air until today.  Actually, I could have flown a little earlier, but in between the two knee surgeries I somehow came up with a hernia.  That delayed my flying for another 4 weeks.  Not so much that I couldn’t fly during the hernia recovery, the doctor was concerned about the force required to push the tail down and spin the plane around to then push it uphill out of the hangar.  Guess I should not have described that part to him.

 

Fortunately, Nancy took me for a couple of rides over the last two weeks to familiarize me with the art of flying.  Today was the perfect day.  CAVU and calm.  As in the past, I found that muscle memory carried me through the flying maneuvers, but I really lose familiarity with the cockpit.

I know what I want to look at, but I can’t seem to find it on the instrument panel.  No matter how much broomstick flying I do in the cockpit before a flight after a long layoff, I still have trouble finding the instrument I want to scan.  I know it isn’t old-age because I have always had this problem.  Fortunately, after a few minutes in the air, the instruments seem to relocate themselves to where I remember them being.

 

Anyway, I had my first flight of 2020 and it quickly reminded me of why we love this little airplane so much.  Worth every minute of construction time required to get one completed (if they ever are REALLY completed) and airborne.  For those still building, DON”T STOP.  Doing so will only cause you great lament in the future.

 

Wishing you all a great flying season.  Hope we can all get to Spring Fling and Field of Dreams!!

Jerry Marstall

Asheville, NC

Tri-Q200

900 hrs.