Date   

Re: Q2 question

Jay Scheevel
 

I have used a product called "fabric wash" from airtech coatings during most of my build in order to clean any surface that I was going to bond to. It is a great cleaner/solvent that doesn't leave a residue. I wanted something safe to use on layups that may have pin holes and could leak solvent and damage the foam. To test it I put a piece of blue styrofoam in a jar with this stuff for several weeks and it had no effect on the foam at all. Here is a link if you want to buy some. I swear by it.


Cheers,
Jay
Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID


Mike Dwyer <q200pilot@...> wrote:

DON'T use lacquer thinner (or any solvents)  on the wing anywhere!  That stuff eats the foam big time and will leave you with a gummy goo inside the wing that you can not bond to.  
Mike Dwyer

Q200 Website: http://goo.gl/V8IrJF


On Sun, Oct 25, 2020 at 6:53 PM Adrian Rogers <anrogers29@...> wrote:
Good afternoon guys/gals,

I'm having an issue with the blocks that secure the rudder pedals/rods in place. I'll attach pics and a video that visually shows what looks to be the skin is slightly pulling/delaminating (when pressure is firmly applied) from the fiberglass skin down by my left foot. (I cleaned the area out this morning with lacquer thinner.) Anyone else ever had this problem? And is there a filler that can be injected into the area, expand, leaving the floor solid as a rock?

Any info/comments are greatly appreciated.

Thank you and have a great afternoon!

--
 
Adrian Rogers



Re: 2020 vendors

Corbin
 

No stock.  I don’t think they have had for a while.

Corbin

On Oct 25, 2020, at 7:37 PM, Jay Scheevel <jay@...> wrote:



What is wrong with using the original material/source?

 

https://www.aircraftspruce.com/catalog/pnpages/01-01166.php?msclkid=f67805ef78e7169a70e85a79613005e5&utm_source=bing&utm_medium=cpc&utm_campaign=TNT%20-%20Shopping%20-%20BR%20-%20Desktop&utm_term=4580634161251749&utm_content=All%20Products

 

Cheers,

Jay

 

From: main@Q-List.groups.io <main@Q-List.groups.io> On Behalf Of Sam Hoskins
Sent: Sunday, October 25, 2020 6:16 PM
To: Main@q-list.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Q-List] 2020 vendors

 

Close, but that Tommydock stuff is in 48" blocks and we need 50"sections. It's the right material though.

 

The big billets are out there, these newbies just need to dig a little deeper.

 

Sam

 

On Sun, Oct 25, 2020, 5:12 PM Mike Dwyer <q200pilot@...> wrote:

 

On Sat, Oct 24, 2020 at 11:22 PM Brian Hutchinson via groups.io <brianmh13=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

No recommendation from me for foam. Thanks for bringing up the matter of forces in the foam. I had watched a video on Metallurgy the other day considering the crystalline structure and it was said the forces move through the metal in a way that is similar to the way described here. Though I don't think the foam experiences true shear load (90 degree to the upper and lower surfaces) the forces wound think are variable and related to amount of deflection of wing tip to root. Vertically laminated seems the best way to join foam blocks I agree. These are the "little" considerations that have big effects and are what needs to be discussed in my opinion more important than enduring debates on why auto conversion engines are the devil and such.


--

Corbin 
N33QR


Re: 2020 vendors

Mike Dwyer
 

The orange had much bigger air pockets that sucked up more micro to fill.  My kit came with the blue, but my buddies was orange.  We hotwired both and they cut the same.  I like the blue!
Mike Dwyer

Q200 Website: http://goo.gl/V8IrJF


On Sun, Oct 25, 2020 at 6:39 PM Brian Larick <blarick@...> wrote:
What is the difference between the current Dow Blue foam blocks and the original kit orange blocks?

Brian

On Oct 25, 2020, at 18:12, Mike Dwyer <q200pilot@...> wrote:


On Sat, Oct 24, 2020 at 11:22 PM Brian Hutchinson via groups.io <brianmh13=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
No recommendation from me for foam. Thanks for bringing up the matter of forces in the foam. I had watched a video on Metallurgy the other day considering the crystalline structure and it was said the forces move through the metal in a way that is similar to the way described here. Though I don't think the foam experiences true shear load (90 degree to the upper and lower surfaces) the forces wound think are variable and related to amount of deflection of wing tip to root. Vertically laminated seems the best way to join foam blocks I agree. These are the "little" considerations that have big effects and are what needs to be discussed in my opinion more important than enduring debates on why auto conversion engines are the devil and such.


Re: 2020 vendors

Jay Scheevel
 

From: main@Q-List.groups.io <main@Q-List.groups.io> On Behalf Of Sam Hoskins
Sent: Sunday, October 25, 2020 6:16 PM
To: Main@q-list.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Q-List] 2020 vendors

 

Close, but that Tommydock stuff is in 48" blocks and we need 50"sections. It's the right material though.

 

The big billets are out there, these newbies just need to dig a little deeper.

 

Sam

 

On Sun, Oct 25, 2020, 5:12 PM Mike Dwyer <q200pilot@...> wrote:

 

On Sat, Oct 24, 2020 at 11:22 PM Brian Hutchinson via groups.io <brianmh13=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

No recommendation from me for foam. Thanks for bringing up the matter of forces in the foam. I had watched a video on Metallurgy the other day considering the crystalline structure and it was said the forces move through the metal in a way that is similar to the way described here. Though I don't think the foam experiences true shear load (90 degree to the upper and lower surfaces) the forces wound think are variable and related to amount of deflection of wing tip to root. Vertically laminated seems the best way to join foam blocks I agree. These are the "little" considerations that have big effects and are what needs to be discussed in my opinion more important than enduring debates on why auto conversion engines are the devil and such.


Re: Q2 question

Mike Dwyer
 

DON'T use lacquer thinner (or any solvents)  on the wing anywhere!  That stuff eats the foam big time and will leave you with a gummy goo inside the wing that you can not bond to.  
Mike Dwyer

Q200 Website: http://goo.gl/V8IrJF


On Sun, Oct 25, 2020 at 6:53 PM Adrian Rogers <anrogers29@...> wrote:
Good afternoon guys/gals,

I'm having an issue with the blocks that secure the rudder pedals/rods in place. I'll attach pics and a video that visually shows what looks to be the skin is slightly pulling/delaminating (when pressure is firmly applied) from the fiberglass skin down by my left foot. (I cleaned the area out this morning with lacquer thinner.) Anyone else ever had this problem? And is there a filler that can be injected into the area, expand, leaving the floor solid as a rock?

Any info/comments are greatly appreciated.

Thank you and have a great afternoon!

--
 
Adrian Rogers



Re: Q2 question

John ten
 

Hi Adrian,

It is extremely unwise to use solvents in this application.  If the glass has any holes, cracks or discontinuities, solvents can melt the core material below.  You can start with a small problem and in “fixing” it, finish up with a much bigger one... Similarly with expanding filler, it can push the skins off the core.  Sam’s suggestion will work fine. Tap test it to define the boundary of the delamination, have a look at the layup schedule to figure out the fiber orientation. Get a big syringe from the vet or your local drug dealer, measure the outlet diameter and pick a drill diameter that will enable you to get a seal when you push the syringe into the hole, drill a couple of holes across from one another on the boundary so that you do the least damage to the structure. Mix up some really runny micro with slow epoxy,  warm the area and gently inject the micro in the lower hole and wait until it comes out the higher hole. Slightly over fill it and put a square of duct tap over the lower hole until cured. When it is cured tap test again to make sure you have filled the void and then finish up as Sam suggested, sanding the top surface dull and paint free before glassing. 

Cheers  

On Monday, October 26, 2020, 11:50 am, Adrian Rogers <anrogers29@...> wrote:

Good afternoon guys/gals,

I'm having an issue with the blocks that secure the rudder pedals/rods in place. I'll attach pics and a video that visually shows what looks to be the skin is slightly pulling/delaminating (when pressure is firmly applied) from the fiberglass skin down by my left foot. (I cleaned the area out this morning with lacquer thinner.) Anyone else ever had this problem? And is there a filler that can be injected into the area, expand, leaving the floor solid as a rock?

Any info/comments are greatly appreciated.

Thank you and have a great afternoon!

--
 
Adrian Rogers



Re: Q2 question

Jeffrey Bevilacqua
 

Adrian. I sent you a PM on this. 


On Oct 25, 2020, at 3:52 PM, Adrian Rogers <anrogers29@...> wrote:


Good afternoon guys/gals,

I'm having an issue with the blocks that secure the rudder pedals/rods in place. I'll attach pics and a video that visually shows what looks to be the skin is slightly pulling/delaminating (when pressure is firmly applied) from the fiberglass skin down by my left foot. (I cleaned the area out this morning with lacquer thinner.) Anyone else ever had this problem? And is there a filler that can be injected into the area, expand, leaving the floor solid as a rock?

Any info/comments are greatly appreciated.

Thank you and have a great afternoon!

--
 
Adrian Rogers


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<IMG_6704.MOV>


Re: 2020 vendors

Sam Hoskins
 

Close, but that Tommydock stuff is in 48" blocks and we need 50"sections. It's the right material though.

The big billets are out there, these newbies just need to dig a little deeper.

Sam

On Sun, Oct 25, 2020, 5:12 PM Mike Dwyer <q200pilot@...> wrote:

On Sat, Oct 24, 2020 at 11:22 PM Brian Hutchinson via groups.io <brianmh13=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
No recommendation from me for foam. Thanks for bringing up the matter of forces in the foam. I had watched a video on Metallurgy the other day considering the crystalline structure and it was said the forces move through the metal in a way that is similar to the way described here. Though I don't think the foam experiences true shear load (90 degree to the upper and lower surfaces) the forces wound think are variable and related to amount of deflection of wing tip to root. Vertically laminated seems the best way to join foam blocks I agree. These are the "little" considerations that have big effects and are what needs to be discussed in my opinion more important than enduring debates on why auto conversion engines are the devil and such.


Re: Q2 question

Sam Hoskins
 

I had something like this once. I drilled a lot of small holes then injected microslurry. After that I added a couple of plies of glass to stiffen it up.

Sam

On Sun, Oct 25, 2020, 5:52 PM Adrian Rogers <anrogers29@...> wrote:
Good afternoon guys/gals,

I'm having an issue with the blocks that secure the rudder pedals/rods in place. I'll attach pics and a video that visually shows what looks to be the skin is slightly pulling/delaminating (when pressure is firmly applied) from the fiberglass skin down by my left foot. (I cleaned the area out this morning with lacquer thinner.) Anyone else ever had this problem? And is there a filler that can be injected into the area, expand, leaving the floor solid as a rock?

Any info/comments are greatly appreciated.

Thank you and have a great afternoon!

--
 
Adrian Rogers



Re: Finally found a picture of what I envision

 

Exactly my plan Rick plexi is cheaper. Once I have the template made, and correct I'll use it to make a vacuum mold for carbon. The CAD layout is coming along. I have 7 switches so far and I'm sure a couple more when I start looking at other systems. 


Q2 question

 

Good afternoon guys/gals,

I'm having an issue with the blocks that secure the rudder pedals/rods in place. I'll attach pics and a video that visually shows what looks to be the skin is slightly pulling/delaminating (when pressure is firmly applied) from the fiberglass skin down by my left foot. (I cleaned the area out this morning with lacquer thinner.) Anyone else ever had this problem? And is there a filler that can be injected into the area, expand, leaving the floor solid as a rock?

Any info/comments are greatly appreciated.

Thank you and have a great afternoon!

--
 
Adrian Rogers



Re: 2020 vendors

Bruce McCormack
 

The story way back was that the color change was to make it less attractive to beavers who attacked docks.

On 25Oct, 2020, at 17:39, Brian Larick <blarick@...> wrote:

What is the difference between the current Dow Blue foam blocks and the original kit orange blocks?

Brian

On Oct 25, 2020, at 18:12, Mike Dwyer <q200pilot@...> wrote:


On Sat, Oct 24, 2020 at 11:22 PM Brian Hutchinson via groups.io <brianmh13=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
No recommendation from me for foam. Thanks for bringing up the matter of forces in the foam. I had watched a video on Metallurgy the other day considering the crystalline structure and it was said the forces move through the metal in a way that is similar to the way described here. Though I don't think the foam experiences true shear load (90 degree to the upper and lower surfaces) the forces wound think are variable and related to amount of deflection of wing tip to root. Vertically laminated seems the best way to join foam blocks I agree. These are the "little" considerations that have big effects and are what needs to be discussed in my opinion more important than enduring debates on why auto conversion engines are the devil and such.




Re: 2020 vendors

Brian Larick
 

What is the difference between the current Dow Blue foam blocks and the original kit orange blocks?

Brian

On Oct 25, 2020, at 18:12, Mike Dwyer <q200pilot@...> wrote:


On Sat, Oct 24, 2020 at 11:22 PM Brian Hutchinson via groups.io <brianmh13=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
No recommendation from me for foam. Thanks for bringing up the matter of forces in the foam. I had watched a video on Metallurgy the other day considering the crystalline structure and it was said the forces move through the metal in a way that is similar to the way described here. Though I don't think the foam experiences true shear load (90 degree to the upper and lower surfaces) the forces wound think are variable and related to amount of deflection of wing tip to root. Vertically laminated seems the best way to join foam blocks I agree. These are the "little" considerations that have big effects and are what needs to be discussed in my opinion more important than enduring debates on why auto conversion engines are the devil and such.


Re: 2020 vendors

Mike Dwyer
 


On Sat, Oct 24, 2020 at 11:22 PM Brian Hutchinson via groups.io <brianmh13=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
No recommendation from me for foam. Thanks for bringing up the matter of forces in the foam. I had watched a video on Metallurgy the other day considering the crystalline structure and it was said the forces move through the metal in a way that is similar to the way described here. Though I don't think the foam experiences true shear load (90 degree to the upper and lower surfaces) the forces wound think are variable and related to amount of deflection of wing tip to root. Vertically laminated seems the best way to join foam blocks I agree. These are the "little" considerations that have big effects and are what needs to be discussed in my opinion more important than enduring debates on why auto conversion engines are the devil and such.


Re: A better Roll Trim

Paul Fisher
 

I just used one inch wide elastic.  I don't know what kind it was, my wife had it in her sewing stuff,  I just appropriated it!  In this case I used two strands of it and sewed about two inches of velcro to each end.  The excess length is so I can adjust the amount of trim I need.

Here are a couple of pictures.  One has the "trim device" laying on the center console, but you can see the velcro on the console on both sides of the control stick. The second shows it in position with right aileron trim.  Left trim is done by attaching both ends of the elastic to the left side of the console.  It is not the least bit elegant, but it's hard to be any simpler or any lighter weight.

I was very worried about the failure mode of a trim device that I wouldn't be able to control.  Ripping both sides of the velcro off takes virtually no time and there is no way it can jam the controls once removed.  I've flown with this for 10+ years.  I think I had to replace the elastic once, but otherwise it has worked perfectly. YMMV.

I hope that helps.

Paul Fisher
Q-200 N17PF


On Sat, Oct 24, 2020 at 10:42 PM Michael <dunningme@...> wrote:
Paul - do you have any pictures of your setup? What kind of elastic did you use?
--
-MD
#2827 (still thinking about planning on visualizing how to finish building)


Re: Finally found a picture of what I envision

Rick Hole
 

I have many a bunch of panels for both Velocity and Q.  Computer designed panels are great but complicated to use.  Another option is poster board full size with paper-doll style full sized instruments. You can get many of those online.  Do remember the third dimension and that you will need a margin around the panel perimeter.
When you get close to installing I like to cut a test panel from 1/4" plywood or plexiglass.  Save the real panel for when you have right.
Rick Hole

On Sun, Oct 25, 2020, 10:27 AM Cody <cody.craig1985@...> wrote:
I w have my heart set on this type of setup. Aveo switch cluster. Single Dynon 7"-10" display, engine monitor, autopilot without the hard keys. Stratus ESG transponder. THANKYOU Sam for posting the pic of your roll trim. It looks like a great location to set a roll trim servo. Of course the panel pictured is a bush plane. But so far dimensions seem workable for my Q. 


Finally found a picture of what I envision

 

I w have my heart set on this type of setup. Aveo switch cluster. Single Dynon 7"-10" display, engine monitor, autopilot without the hard keys. Stratus ESG transponder. THANKYOU Sam for posting the pic of your roll trim. It looks like a great location to set a roll trim servo. Of course the panel pictured is a bush plane. But so far dimensions seem workable for my Q. 


Re: A better Roll Trim

Michael
 

Paul - do you have any pictures of your setup? What kind of elastic did you use?
--
-MD
#2827 (still thinking about planning on visualizing how to finish building)


Re: 2020 vendors

Brian Hutchinson
 

No recommendation from me for foam. Thanks for bringing up the matter of forces in the foam. I had watched a video on Metallurgy the other day considering the crystalline structure and it was said the forces move through the metal in a way that is similar to the way described here. Though I don't think the foam experiences true shear load (90 degree to the upper and lower surfaces) the forces wound think are variable and related to amount of deflection of wing tip to root. Vertically laminated seems the best way to join foam blocks I agree. These are the "little" considerations that have big effects and are what needs to be discussed in my opinion more important than enduring debates on why auto conversion engines are the devil and such.


Re: A better Roll Trim

Jay Scheevel
 

Very nice, Sam. And simple too.

Cheers,
Jay

Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID


Sam Hoskins <sam.hoskins@...> wrote:

Adding a Better Roll Trim

 
I've been meaning to post this for a long time.. You can also see it here sam.hoskins.blogspot.com

Roll trim is very good to have in the Q-200. Not only do you need to compensate for the weight of a passenger, but roll trim needs change with your speed.  For instance, I notice a big difference when I slow down to landing pattern speeds.
 
For the longest time, I had the turnbuckle mod on the elevator push rods.  This worked okay, but it was a little hard to adjust, and I found mine seemed to change with the airframe vibration and I'd had to keep on adjusting it.  I was corresponding with Mathew Curcio and he shared his method, and like a true innovator, I copied it.  I really like it.  It's easy to adjust and it and it doesn't change on it's own.  If someone wanted to take it a step further, a guy could install some kind of motor and control it with a switch. 
 
I've been using setup this for about a year now and I really like it. I'm not going to describe how to make it, I hope the photos should speak for themselves.


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