Date   

Ram Air Vent Tube and Pitot Tube Cover

Corbin
 

Can anyone point me to some covers that fit our little pitot tube and fuel vent tubes?

Bruce - I just watched the Zoom and if you remember the size and source for the one you had on top for your ram vent tube please let me know.

Thanks,

Corbin Ge!ser

--

Corbin 
N33QR


Re: Flight report

Jay Scheevel
 

Hi Richard,

 

Oddly enough and quite out of character, I did not take any pictures of the install. I only took pictures of the lables, so that I could register warranty on them. I will take some pics next time I am out at the hangar, and post those for anyone who is interested. They seem to be working out quite well.

 

Cheers,

Jay

 

From: main@Q-List.groups.io <main@Q-List.groups.io> On Behalf Of Richard Thomson
Sent: Monday, November 16, 2020 2:30 AM
To: main@Q-List.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Q-List] Flight report

 

Pleased to hear you are having fun Jay, seems no time ago it was your first flight.

Have you put up any pictures of your servo install ?

Br

Rich T.

 

On 15/11/2020 21:40, Jay Scheevel wrote:

Hi All,

 

Had not been up in my Q for a couple weeks, so I thought I would take advantage of a nice calm, cool, crystal-clear fall day to do a short local flight. I have recently finished the final paint on my wheel fairings, so it is nice to have the airframe “finished”. Although it is a homebuilt, so I guess you are never really finished, right Sammy?

 

It was my first flight in a long time where the density altitude was less than the field altitude. DA was 4250 and field elevation is 4750 MSL.  So I guess you could call it a “low altitude” shake out flight for me. The good thing about cooler temperatures (5 degrees C at 1000’ AGL) is that it allows me to close up my radiator air exit doors and reduce drag. That adds some nice speed, so once I got up and level, I was showing over 170 mph TAS at about 70% power. Pulling it back to economy cruise (55% power), still gave me 160 mph TAS, which is really a nice speed at 5.5 gph!  The scenery is tremendous out here any time of year, but the lower sun angles make it really pop. Had to take a little opportunity to take it in, so I flew along the west edge of our valley (Grand Junction, CO) and flew down over the cemetery where my dad is resting and made a tight circle and couple of wing wags to say hello. The plane really likes about a 35 degree turn angle. It kind of “locks in” at that angle.

 

At my last condition inspection, I installed the autopilot servos, so I have been playing with the autopilot for a month or so. It is really nice to have, and having it hold altitude and heading is a real pleasure.  That gives you a chance to play with the engine settings without holding the stick. And magically, you can just twist the heading bug to make a turn. I have not used it for a multileg trip yet, but if I get the opportunity in one of the colder months, it will be nice.

 

Since it is starting to get chilly here, it is worth mentioning that I take my cabin heat air off the back side of the left and right radiators, so when I close up the exit air doors,  I get extra pressure on the hot air source into the cabin. That is a nice feature of winter flying for me, since that is the time that you are flying with the radiator exits mostly closed up.

 

My engine is really running smoothly and the rest of the plane is functioning as designed, so I am a happy homebuilder and now have 121 hours on the plane. Hoping to get out and see some of you in 2021, and maybe make that long dreamt of trip to OSH this year.

 

For those of you in Canada, hope you had a nice Thanksgiving, for those of you in the US, Happy Thanksgiving,  11 days from now, and for everyone else, I hope you have a nice November 26th!

 

Cheers,

Jay Scheevel, Tri-Q2 N8WQ, 121 hours.


Bruce Crain's Q-Tour is now on YouTube. #Q-Tour

Sam Hoskins
 

Here is Bruce & Joanne!  https://youtu.be/oVKt3b14fMk

Just to simplify things, I included both parts into one video.  The Q&A session, Part II, starts at 31:45.

Thanks to Bruce & Honey Lamb and everyone who joined the Zoom meeting.


Re: Electronic Ignition Install - No Spark from Coils

Corbin
 

Thanks Leif....very helpful!

Corbin

On Nov 15, 2020, at 10:24 PM, Leif Johnson <jetdude@...> wrote:

 Corbin. 
After simply filing the holes to move the sensor out and up I filled the gap in the enlongated holes with hard gasket maker, then torqued it solid with slightly oversized washers and locking nuts. It needs to be held in place as it’s tightened of corse. I found the sensor to be much more sensitive to radial (up and down) positioning than gap distance to the disk. That dimension has quite a bit of slop with the crank fore/aft movement anyway. It has operated well with no issues for about 60 hours now.  I was surprised at how much of the case needed removed to make that bracket sit flat and flush with the case split line. I fly the hell out of my EZ and will do the same with my Q. Hope that helps. 
Leif. 


On Nov 15, 2020, at 17:54, Sam Hoskins <sam.hoskins@...> wrote:


My LSE installation had a very different setup, it had circuit board mounted to the front of the crankcase,, so I don't really know what I'm talking about here. But, it does look like your mounting block is not parallel to the rotor. I don't know if that's a factor or not.

Sam 

On Sun, Nov 15, 2020, 4:57 PM Corbin via groups.io <c_geiser=icloud.com@groups.io> wrote:
....And here is a photo of where it needs to be installed.  I am still going to test to see if the DC mini sensor needs to go a tad higher to be in the ideal position for the magnet.

In the first one, you can see how the new revised location of the sensor does not match the horizontal lines (going against the install manual).  In fact, they are way off (see earlier pic above).  This location gets a consistent spark every rotation.  If the manual is followed and the lines match up, but no spark of course.  In the second pic, I have rotated the magnet plate so you can see where the little "dot" magnet passes by the sensor.  It needs to pass by in this area or a tad lower.  The original bracket and holes had it passing at the very top of the sensor which is really far off from being read.

Again, it could be the sensor could come up a little higher so still adjusting before getting new brackets or welding of current holes done.


<IMG_4258.jpeg>


<IMG_4259.jpeg>

--

Corbin 
N33QR


--

Corbin 
N33QR


Re: Flight report

Richard Thomson
 

Pleased to hear you are having fun Jay, seems no time ago it was your first flight.

Have you put up any pictures of your servo install ?

Br

Rich T.


On 15/11/2020 21:40, Jay Scheevel wrote:

Hi All,

 

Had not been up in my Q for a couple weeks, so I thought I would take advantage of a nice calm, cool, crystal-clear fall day to do a short local flight. I have recently finished the final paint on my wheel fairings, so it is nice to have the airframe “finished”. Although it is a homebuilt, so I guess you are never really finished, right Sammy?

 

It was my first flight in a long time where the density altitude was less than the field altitude. DA was 4250 and field elevation is 4750 MSL.  So I guess you could call it a “low altitude” shake out flight for me. The good thing about cooler temperatures (5 degrees C at 1000’ AGL) is that it allows me to close up my radiator air exit doors and reduce drag. That adds some nice speed, so once I got up and level, I was showing over 170 mph TAS at about 70% power. Pulling it back to economy cruise (55% power), still gave me 160 mph TAS, which is really a nice speed at 5.5 gph!  The scenery is tremendous out here any time of year, but the lower sun angles make it really pop. Had to take a little opportunity to take it in, so I flew along the west edge of our valley (Grand Junction, CO) and flew down over the cemetery where my dad is resting and made a tight circle and couple of wing wags to say hello. The plane really likes about a 35 degree turn angle. It kind of “locks in” at that angle.

 

At my last condition inspection, I installed the autopilot servos, so I have been playing with the autopilot for a month or so. It is really nice to have, and having it hold altitude and heading is a real pleasure.  That gives you a chance to play with the engine settings without holding the stick. And magically, you can just twist the heading bug to make a turn. I have not used it for a multileg trip yet, but if I get the opportunity in one of the colder months, it will be nice.

 

Since it is starting to get chilly here, it is worth mentioning that I take my cabin heat air off the back side of the left and right radiators, so when I close up the exit air doors,  I get extra pressure on the hot air source into the cabin. That is a nice feature of winter flying for me, since that is the time that you are flying with the radiator exits mostly closed up.

 

My engine is really running smoothly and the rest of the plane is functioning as designed, so I am a happy homebuilder and now have 121 hours on the plane. Hoping to get out and see some of you in 2021, and maybe make that long dreamt of trip to OSH this year.

 

For those of you in Canada, hope you had a nice Thanksgiving, for those of you in the US, Happy Thanksgiving,  11 days from now, and for everyone else, I hope you have a nice November 26th!

 

Cheers,

Jay Scheevel, Tri-Q2 N8WQ, 121 hours.


Re: Electronic Ignition Install - No Spark from Coils

Leif Johnson
 

Corbin. 
After simply filing the holes to move the sensor out and up I filled the gap in the enlongated holes with hard gasket maker, then torqued it solid with slightly oversized washers and locking nuts. It needs to be held in place as it’s tightened of corse. I found the sensor to be much more sensitive to radial (up and down) positioning than gap distance to the disk. That dimension has quite a bit of slop with the crank fore/aft movement anyway. It has operated well with no issues for about 60 hours now.  I was surprised at how much of the case needed removed to make that bracket sit flat and flush with the case split line. I fly the hell out of my EZ and will do the same with my Q. Hope that helps. 
Leif. 


On Nov 15, 2020, at 17:54, Sam Hoskins <sam.hoskins@...> wrote:


My LSE installation had a very different setup, it had circuit board mounted to the front of the crankcase,, so I don't really know what I'm talking about here. But, it does look like your mounting block is not parallel to the rotor. I don't know if that's a factor or not.

Sam 

On Sun, Nov 15, 2020, 4:57 PM Corbin via groups.io <c_geiser=icloud.com@groups.io> wrote:
....And here is a photo of where it needs to be installed.  I am still going to test to see if the DC mini sensor needs to go a tad higher to be in the ideal position for the magnet.

In the first one, you can see how the new revised location of the sensor does not match the horizontal lines (going against the install manual).  In fact, they are way off (see earlier pic above).  This location gets a consistent spark every rotation.  If the manual is followed and the lines match up, but no spark of course.  In the second pic, I have rotated the magnet plate so you can see where the little "dot" magnet passes by the sensor.  It needs to pass by in this area or a tad lower.  The original bracket and holes had it passing at the very top of the sensor which is really far off from being read.

Again, it could be the sensor could come up a little higher so still adjusting before getting new brackets or welding of current holes done.


<IMG_4258.jpeg>


<IMG_4259.jpeg>

--

Corbin 
N33QR


Re: Electronic Ignition Install - No Spark from Coils

Brad Walker
 

I've been a member of this group for a long time and never really post until now.. But, I use these Hall-effect sensors in my professional life and there is no way to know about the "alignment tolerance" with the document. These sensors are measured using the strength of the magnetic field. The Hall-effect sensor vendor will provide you with details about the spacing and how it effects the
magnetic field.

Here is a chart from a vendor that shows how the sensor operates in the presence of a mag field. Notice if the magnetic flux is not strong enough, the sensor will never turn on.

So if the vendor hasn't properly characterized the sensor, then it really could be a problem.

-brad w.


On Sun, Nov 15, 2020 at 8:04 AM Anthony P <solarant@...> wrote:
This is all very good information/findings for public distribution.

Seems like the free magnet passing over the sensor should be a recommended early trouble shooting procedure.  Maybe even a bench procedure for proving system function before an aircraft is involved.

"The alignment is within the tolerance of the manual but not enough to get the spark."
This is a problem. If the sensor is within the stated alignment tolerance radially and axially, but the system does not function, then the tolerance spec is wrong. Not good. 
Due to many factors, the stated alignment tolerance needs to be well within the actual alignment tolerance for system functionality. 
Otherwise someone could be on the cusp of functionality without knowing it and vibration, thermal expansion, sensor performance thermal effects, magnetic strength thermal effects,... could push it into the non-functioning region.
Added to this list are magnetic field shape and strength variation from the manufacturer.  This, of course, should be baked into the system level alignment tolerance.
What are the radial and axial alignment tolerance specs?  ,_


Re: Electronic Ignition Install - No Spark from Coils

Corbin
 

Good point.  I should clarify, it is set at .032” with the crankshaft in all the way.  I need to measure the gap with it out all the way.

Corbin

On Nov 15, 2020, at 7:21 PM, Sam Hoskins <sam.hoskins@...> wrote:


There will be a certain amount of play in the crankshaft, so be sure to load the prop forward when you establish your clearance. 

On Sun, Nov 15, 2020, 5:57 PM Corbin via groups.io <c_geiser=icloud.com@groups.io> wrote:
Good eye, Sam.  I just quickly mounted it there for the photo.  We are still drilling the adjustment holes to get it spaced up just right.  Aiming for .03” of clearance top and bottom.

Corbin

On Nov 15, 2020, at 5:54 PM, Sam Hoskins <sam.hoskins@...> wrote:


My LSE installation had a very different setup, it had circuit board mounted to the front of the crankcase,, so I don't really know what I'm talking about here. But, it does look like your mounting block is not parallel to the rotor. I don't know if that's a factor or not.

Sam 

On Sun, Nov 15, 2020, 4:57 PM Corbin via groups.io <c_geiser=icloud.com@groups.io> wrote:
....And here is a photo of where it needs to be installed.  I am still going to test to see if the DC mini sensor needs to go a tad higher to be in the ideal position for the magnet.

In the first one, you can see how the new revised location of the sensor does not match the horizontal lines (going against the install manual).  In fact, they are way off (see earlier pic above).  This location gets a consistent spark every rotation.  If the manual is followed and the lines match up, but no spark of course.  In the second pic, I have rotated the magnet plate so you can see where the little "dot" magnet passes by the sensor.  It needs to pass by in this area or a tad lower.  The original bracket and holes had it passing at the very top of the sensor which is really far off from being read.

Again, it could be the sensor could come up a little higher so still adjusting before getting new brackets or welding of current holes done.


<IMG_4258.jpeg>


<IMG_4259.jpeg>

--

Corbin 
N33QR


--

Corbin 
N33QR


--

Corbin 
N33QR


Re: Electronic Ignition Install - No Spark from Coils

Sam Hoskins
 

There will be a certain amount of play in the crankshaft, so be sure to load the prop forward when you establish your clearance. 


On Sun, Nov 15, 2020, 5:57 PM Corbin via groups.io <c_geiser=icloud.com@groups.io> wrote:
Good eye, Sam.  I just quickly mounted it there for the photo.  We are still drilling the adjustment holes to get it spaced up just right.  Aiming for .03” of clearance top and bottom.

Corbin

On Nov 15, 2020, at 5:54 PM, Sam Hoskins <sam.hoskins@...> wrote:


My LSE installation had a very different setup, it had circuit board mounted to the front of the crankcase,, so I don't really know what I'm talking about here. But, it does look like your mounting block is not parallel to the rotor. I don't know if that's a factor or not.

Sam 

On Sun, Nov 15, 2020, 4:57 PM Corbin via groups.io <c_geiser=icloud.com@groups.io> wrote:
....And here is a photo of where it needs to be installed.  I am still going to test to see if the DC mini sensor needs to go a tad higher to be in the ideal position for the magnet.

In the first one, you can see how the new revised location of the sensor does not match the horizontal lines (going against the install manual).  In fact, they are way off (see earlier pic above).  This location gets a consistent spark every rotation.  If the manual is followed and the lines match up, but no spark of course.  In the second pic, I have rotated the magnet plate so you can see where the little "dot" magnet passes by the sensor.  It needs to pass by in this area or a tad lower.  The original bracket and holes had it passing at the very top of the sensor which is really far off from being read.

Again, it could be the sensor could come up a little higher so still adjusting before getting new brackets or welding of current holes done.


<IMG_4258.jpeg>


<IMG_4259.jpeg>

--

Corbin 
N33QR


--

Corbin 
N33QR


Re: Electronic Ignition Install - No Spark from Coils

Corbin
 

Actually, not drilling but using a needle file to get it just right.

Corbin

On Nov 15, 2020, at 5:57 PM, Corbin via groups.io <c_geiser@...> wrote:

Good eye, Sam.  I just quickly mounted it there for the photo.  We are still drilling the adjustment holes to get it spaced up just right.  Aiming for .03” of clearance top and bottom.

Corbin

On Nov 15, 2020, at 5:54 PM, Sam Hoskins <sam.hoskins@...> wrote:


My LSE installation had a very different setup, it had circuit board mounted to the front of the crankcase,, so I don't really know what I'm talking about here. But, it does look like your mounting block is not parallel to the rotor. I don't know if that's a factor or not.

Sam 

On Sun, Nov 15, 2020, 4:57 PM Corbin via groups.io <c_geiser=icloud.com@groups.io> wrote:
....And here is a photo of where it needs to be installed.  I am still going to test to see if the DC mini sensor needs to go a tad higher to be in the ideal position for the magnet.

In the first one, you can see how the new revised location of the sensor does not match the horizontal lines (going against the install manual).  In fact, they are way off (see earlier pic above).  This location gets a consistent spark every rotation.  If the manual is followed and the lines match up, but no spark of course.  In the second pic, I have rotated the magnet plate so you can see where the little "dot" magnet passes by the sensor.  It needs to pass by in this area or a tad lower.  The original bracket and holes had it passing at the very top of the sensor which is really far off from being read.

Again, it could be the sensor could come up a little higher so still adjusting before getting new brackets or welding of current holes done.


<IMG_4258.jpeg>


<IMG_4259.jpeg>

--

Corbin 
N33QR


--

Corbin 
N33QR

--

Corbin 
N33QR


Re: Electronic Ignition Install - No Spark from Coils

Corbin
 

Good eye, Sam.  I just quickly mounted it there for the photo.  We are still drilling the adjustment holes to get it spaced up just right.  Aiming for .03” of clearance top and bottom.

Corbin

On Nov 15, 2020, at 5:54 PM, Sam Hoskins <sam.hoskins@...> wrote:


My LSE installation had a very different setup, it had circuit board mounted to the front of the crankcase,, so I don't really know what I'm talking about here. But, it does look like your mounting block is not parallel to the rotor. I don't know if that's a factor or not.

Sam 

On Sun, Nov 15, 2020, 4:57 PM Corbin via groups.io <c_geiser=icloud.com@groups.io> wrote:
....And here is a photo of where it needs to be installed.  I am still going to test to see if the DC mini sensor needs to go a tad higher to be in the ideal position for the magnet.

In the first one, you can see how the new revised location of the sensor does not match the horizontal lines (going against the install manual).  In fact, they are way off (see earlier pic above).  This location gets a consistent spark every rotation.  If the manual is followed and the lines match up, but no spark of course.  In the second pic, I have rotated the magnet plate so you can see where the little "dot" magnet passes by the sensor.  It needs to pass by in this area or a tad lower.  The original bracket and holes had it passing at the very top of the sensor which is really far off from being read.

Again, it could be the sensor could come up a little higher so still adjusting before getting new brackets or welding of current holes done.


<IMG_4258.jpeg>


<IMG_4259.jpeg>

--

Corbin 
N33QR


--

Corbin 
N33QR


Re: Electronic Ignition Install - No Spark from Coils

Sam Hoskins
 

My LSE installation had a very different setup, it had circuit board mounted to the front of the crankcase,, so I don't really know what I'm talking about here. But, it does look like your mounting block is not parallel to the rotor. I don't know if that's a factor or not.

Sam 

On Sun, Nov 15, 2020, 4:57 PM Corbin via groups.io <c_geiser=icloud.com@groups.io> wrote:
....And here is a photo of where it needs to be installed.  I am still going to test to see if the DC mini sensor needs to go a tad higher to be in the ideal position for the magnet.

In the first one, you can see how the new revised location of the sensor does not match the horizontal lines (going against the install manual).  In fact, they are way off (see earlier pic above).  This location gets a consistent spark every rotation.  If the manual is followed and the lines match up, but no spark of course.  In the second pic, I have rotated the magnet plate so you can see where the little "dot" magnet passes by the sensor.  It needs to pass by in this area or a tad lower.  The original bracket and holes had it passing at the very top of the sensor which is really far off from being read.

Again, it could be the sensor could come up a little higher so still adjusting before getting new brackets or welding of current holes done.





--

Corbin 
N33QR


Re: Electronic Ignition Install - No Spark from Coils

Corbin
 

....And here is a photo of where it needs to be installed.  I am still going to test to see if the DC mini sensor needs to go a tad higher to be in the ideal position for the magnet.

In the first one, you can see how the new revised location of the sensor does not match the horizontal lines (going against the install manual).  In fact, they are way off (see earlier pic above).  This location gets a consistent spark every rotation.  If the manual is followed and the lines match up, but no spark of course.  In the second pic, I have rotated the magnet plate so you can see where the little "dot" magnet passes by the sensor.  It needs to pass by in this area or a tad lower.  The original bracket and holes had it passing at the very top of the sensor which is really far off from being read.

Again, it could be the sensor could come up a little higher so still adjusting before getting new brackets or welding of current holes done.





--

Corbin 
N33QR


Re: Flight report

Bruce Crain
 

Fantastic Jay!  Enjoyed being an “armchair quarterback” with you!
Bruce 


On Nov 15, 2020, at 4:26 PM, Kevin Boddicker <trumanst@...> wrote:

Nice Jay!
Keep reporting, it makes a difference to those still building, and all of us that would liked to have flown today.
We have had some of the windiest weather I can remember. 3+ weeks of this wind.
Need to get in the air! Next weekend sounds like the temps will be favorable. Hope the wind takes a break.

 

Kevin Boddicker
TriQ 200 N7868B   538 hrs
Luana, IA.



On Nov 15, 2020, at 3:40 PM, Jay Scheevel <jay@...> wrote:

Hi All,
 
Had not been up in my Q for a couple weeks, so I thought I would take advantage of a nice calm, cool, crystal-clear fall day to do a short local flight. I have recently finished the final paint on my wheel fairings, so it is nice to have the airframe “finished”. Although it is a homebuilt, so I guess you are never really finished, right Sammy? 
 
It was my first flight in a long time where the density altitude was less than the field altitude. DA was 4250 and field elevation is 4750 MSL.  So I guess you could call it a “low altitude” shake out flight for me. The good thing about cooler temperatures (5 degrees C at 1000’ AGL) is that it allows me to close up my radiator air exit doors and reduce drag. That adds some nice speed, so once I got up and level, I was showing over 170 mph TAS at about 70% power. Pulling it back to economy cruise (55% power), still gave me 160 mph TAS, which is really a nice speed at 5.5 gph!  The scenery is tremendous out here any time of year, but the lower sun angles make it really pop. Had to take a little opportunity to take it in, so I flew along the west edge of our valley (Grand Junction, CO) and flew down over the cemetery where my dad is resting and made a tight circle and couple of wing wags to say hello. The plane really likes about a 35 degree turn angle. It kind of “locks in” at that angle.
 
At my last condition inspection, I installed the autopilot servos, so I have been playing with the autopilot for a month or so. It is really nice to have, and having it hold altitude and heading is a real pleasure.  That gives you a chance to play with the engine settings without holding the stick. And magically, you can just twist the heading bug to make a turn. I have not used it for a multileg trip yet, but if I get the opportunity in one of the colder months, it will be nice. 
 
Since it is starting to get chilly here, it is worth mentioning that I take my cabin heat air off the back side of the left and right radiators, so when I close up the exit air doors,  I get extra pressure on the hot air source into the cabin. That is a nice feature of winter flying for me, since that is the time that you are flying with the radiator exits mostly closed up. 
 
My engine is really running smoothly and the rest of the plane is functioning as designed, so I am a happy homebuilder and now have 121 hours on the plane. Hoping to get out and see some of you in 2021, and maybe make that long dreamt of trip to OSH this year.
 
For those of you in Canada, hope you had a nice Thanksgiving, for those of you in the US, Happy Thanksgiving,  11 days from now, and for everyone else, I hope you have a nice November 26th!
 
Cheers,
Jay Scheevel, Tri-Q2 N8WQ, 121 hours. 




Re: Flight report

Kevin Boddicker
 

Nice Jay!
Keep reporting, it makes a difference to those still building, and all of us that would liked to have flown today.
We have had some of the windiest weather I can remember. 3+ weeks of this wind.
Need to get in the air! Next weekend sounds like the temps will be favorable. Hope the wind takes a break.

 

Kevin Boddicker
TriQ 200 N7868B   538 hrs
Luana, IA.



On Nov 15, 2020, at 3:40 PM, Jay Scheevel <jay@...> wrote:

Hi All,
 
Had not been up in my Q for a couple weeks, so I thought I would take advantage of a nice calm, cool, crystal-clear fall day to do a short local flight. I have recently finished the final paint on my wheel fairings, so it is nice to have the airframe “finished”. Although it is a homebuilt, so I guess you are never really finished, right Sammy? 
 
It was my first flight in a long time where the density altitude was less than the field altitude. DA was 4250 and field elevation is 4750 MSL.  So I guess you could call it a “low altitude” shake out flight for me. The good thing about cooler temperatures (5 degrees C at 1000’ AGL) is that it allows me to close up my radiator air exit doors and reduce drag. That adds some nice speed, so once I got up and level, I was showing over 170 mph TAS at about 70% power. Pulling it back to economy cruise (55% power), still gave me 160 mph TAS, which is really a nice speed at 5.5 gph!  The scenery is tremendous out here any time of year, but the lower sun angles make it really pop. Had to take a little opportunity to take it in, so I flew along the west edge of our valley (Grand Junction, CO) and flew down over the cemetery where my dad is resting and made a tight circle and couple of wing wags to say hello. The plane really likes about a 35 degree turn angle. It kind of “locks in” at that angle.
 
At my last condition inspection, I installed the autopilot servos, so I have been playing with the autopilot for a month or so. It is really nice to have, and having it hold altitude and heading is a real pleasure.  That gives you a chance to play with the engine settings without holding the stick. And magically, you can just twist the heading bug to make a turn. I have not used it for a multileg trip yet, but if I get the opportunity in one of the colder months, it will be nice. 
 
Since it is starting to get chilly here, it is worth mentioning that I take my cabin heat air off the back side of the left and right radiators, so when I close up the exit air doors,  I get extra pressure on the hot air source into the cabin. That is a nice feature of winter flying for me, since that is the time that you are flying with the radiator exits mostly closed up. 
 
My engine is really running smoothly and the rest of the plane is functioning as designed, so I am a happy homebuilder and now have 121 hours on the plane. Hoping to get out and see some of you in 2021, and maybe make that long dreamt of trip to OSH this year.
 
For those of you in Canada, hope you had a nice Thanksgiving, for those of you in the US, Happy Thanksgiving,  11 days from now, and for everyone else, I hope you have a nice November 26th!
 
Cheers,
Jay Scheevel, Tri-Q2 N8WQ, 121 hours. 


Flight report

Jay Scheevel
 

Hi All,

 

Had not been up in my Q for a couple weeks, so I thought I would take advantage of a nice calm, cool, crystal-clear fall day to do a short local flight. I have recently finished the final paint on my wheel fairings, so it is nice to have the airframe “finished”. Although it is a homebuilt, so I guess you are never really finished, right Sammy?

 

It was my first flight in a long time where the density altitude was less than the field altitude. DA was 4250 and field elevation is 4750 MSL.  So I guess you could call it a “low altitude” shake out flight for me. The good thing about cooler temperatures (5 degrees C at 1000’ AGL) is that it allows me to close up my radiator air exit doors and reduce drag. That adds some nice speed, so once I got up and level, I was showing over 170 mph TAS at about 70% power. Pulling it back to economy cruise (55% power), still gave me 160 mph TAS, which is really a nice speed at 5.5 gph!  The scenery is tremendous out here any time of year, but the lower sun angles make it really pop. Had to take a little opportunity to take it in, so I flew along the west edge of our valley (Grand Junction, CO) and flew down over the cemetery where my dad is resting and made a tight circle and couple of wing wags to say hello. The plane really likes about a 35 degree turn angle. It kind of “locks in” at that angle.

 

At my last condition inspection, I installed the autopilot servos, so I have been playing with the autopilot for a month or so. It is really nice to have, and having it hold altitude and heading is a real pleasure.  That gives you a chance to play with the engine settings without holding the stick. And magically, you can just twist the heading bug to make a turn. I have not used it for a multileg trip yet, but if I get the opportunity in one of the colder months, it will be nice.

 

Since it is starting to get chilly here, it is worth mentioning that I take my cabin heat air off the back side of the left and right radiators, so when I close up the exit air doors,  I get extra pressure on the hot air source into the cabin. That is a nice feature of winter flying for me, since that is the time that you are flying with the radiator exits mostly closed up.

 

My engine is really running smoothly and the rest of the plane is functioning as designed, so I am a happy homebuilder and now have 121 hours on the plane. Hoping to get out and see some of you in 2021, and maybe make that long dreamt of trip to OSH this year.

 

For those of you in Canada, hope you had a nice Thanksgiving, for those of you in the US, Happy Thanksgiving,  11 days from now, and for everyone else, I hope you have a nice November 26th!

 

Cheers,

Jay Scheevel, Tri-Q2 N8WQ, 121 hours.


Re: Electronic Ignition Install - No Spark from Coils

Anthony P
 

Thanks for the pic.
Makes sense.
Maybe a part revision miss-match for the kit you received?
Maybe a sensor location problem within the sensor housing?

At least you know what needs to happen now to get it working.


Re: CFG

Sam Hoskins
 

There have been various W&B sheets loaded to the Files section of the Q-list site. You might want to check there.

Sam

On Sun, Nov 15, 2020, 12:22 PM Theo Scheepers <theo.intermark@...> wrote:
Hi does anyone have an XL spreadsheet/program for checking our CFG at various loads and are there any graphs extending the weight say up to 1300lb all up 


CFG

Theo Scheepers
 

Hi does anyone have an XL spreadsheet/program for checking our CFG at various loads and are there any graphs extending the weight say up to 1300lb all up 


Re: Electronic Ignition Install - No Spark from Coils

Corbin
 

Leif,

When you drilled the holes to the oval shape, so you could move the sensor, what did you do (if anything) to prevent the sensor from vibrating or coming loose in any way and sliding down to the original location?  I have done the exact same thing as you describe above to confirm a working location but I have not put much thought into how to prevent "sensor creep" other than filling in with weld and drilling new holes.
--

Corbin 
N33QR

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