Date   

Re: Your Opinion

Terry Adams
 

Keith,
I have a plane with mechanical (Airflow Performance) and a plane with electronic (SDS) fuel injection so my opinion may be limited.� I especially question the sentence in the article "
Fuel-injected engines also mix fuel and air, but sometimes by misadjustment, wear, manufacturing or design defect or material failure, fuel is able to leak through a seal that separates the fuel from the air in the injector servo".
Not likely.� This definitely is not happening with electronic fuel injection in that typically the fuel is never in the induction system until it is injected in the cylinder.� This would be a long shot on the Airflow Performance even though the fuel is technically in the servo then injected directly in the cylinder after the fuel divider.
Slide throttle "injectors" like the Ellison or AeroCarb are a whole different animal.
Terry Adams
KSCK

On 1/2/2021 7:52 AM, Keith Welsh wrote:
Hello everyone,
I hope y'all had a great bringing in of the new year.�
�
I've attached an article I read about once every five years or so regarding carb icing.�
We all know about carb ice and the danger it poses.� I experienced it years ago in my then Aeronca Chief when, in the summer, the engine stopped producing power on final.� At least it would not throttle up when flaring to land and stopped on touchdown.� After setting a bit she started just fine...by hand propping of course.�
�
The highlighted area toward the end of the article gets my curiosity up and is what I would like your opinions on since many of you are much smarter than I.
The reason for asking is that somewhere in the 90's I had the throttle shaft, throttle plate and intake manifold teflon coated on my Quickie and this article is where it all started.
�
One hot humid day back then while looking down the carburetor with the engine running I was surprised at the amount of water that was forming on the throttle plate, the size of the droplets and the time it took for them to run off.� Onan carbs are on the top of the engine as most know.
I found a company in Indy that did industrial teflon coating, Keco Coatings, and they are still there and this is their website https://www.kecocoatings.com/coatings/teflon/
After the Teflon coating was done the water still formed but with a notable difference.� The droplets were miniature sized and it was like a contest to see who could run off the throttle plate first.� Very impressive.
�
I've never sought the opinion of others regarding this article but knowing the breath of knowledge among you Q guys I thought I'd reach out and see.
�
Thanks for taking the time.
Keith
N494K
�
�
�

-- 
Communication ink and paper free


Re: Your Opinion

Jay Scheevel
 

Hi Keith,

 

Thanks for the link. Interesting stuff about the Teflon. It certainly has the potential to get the droplets much smaller. Not sure if smaller droplets would keep them from freezing though. Just might make it a more uniform coating. When it goes from liquid to solid is a function of primarily temperature, but there are a few other factors associated with agitation and even electrical charge, but the primary influence is temperature and to a lesser degree pressure.

 

It is interesting to hear that you encountered your serious carb ice issue in the summer. I also had a similar experience flying from Winona Minnesota to see a friend of mine in Lafayette Indiana in June a number of years ago. I was flying down the Mississippi river, maybe 2500 feet AGL and I noticed I was having trouble holding my altitude, as I kept trimming it up. I had a constant speed prop, so revs remained constant so all sounded good, then I glanced down at the MP guage and saw like 15 inches! Yikes. I hit the carb heat, and almost killed the engine, probably when a big chunk broke loose. This was a big Lycoming 540 with the intake buried in the oil pan. It was in the mid 60’s (F) outside and thin overcast about 1500 feet above me. Not when I would expect ice, but there it was.  Of course there are other possibilities:  Maybe planes flying to or from Indiana are more prone to ice than other planes.  😊

 

Happy New Year, Keith.

 

Cheers,

Jay

 

From: main@Q-List.groups.io <main@Q-List.groups.io> On Behalf Of Keith Welsh
Sent: Saturday, January 02, 2021 8:53 AM
To: main@Q-List.groups.io
Subject: [Q-List] Your Opinion

 

Hello everyone,

I hope y'all had a great bringing in of the new year. 

 

I've attached an article I read about once every five years or so regarding carb icing. 

We all know about carb ice and the danger it poses.  I experienced it years ago in my then Aeronca Chief when, in the summer, the engine stopped producing power on final.  At least it would not throttle up when flaring to land and stopped on touchdown.  After setting a bit she started just fine...by hand propping of course. 

 

The highlighted area toward the end of the article gets my curiosity up and is what I would like your opinions on since many of you are much smarter than I.

The reason for asking is that somewhere in the 90's I had the throttle shaft, throttle plate and intake manifold teflon coated on my Quickie and this article is where it all started.

 

One hot humid day back then while looking down the carburetor with the engine running I was surprised at the amount of water that was forming on the throttle plate, the size of the droplets and the time it took for them to run off.  Onan carbs are on the top of the engine as most know.

I found a company in Indy that did industrial teflon coating, Keco Coatings, and they are still there and this is their website https://www.kecocoatings.com/coatings/teflon/

After the Teflon coating was done the water still formed but with a notable difference.  The droplets were miniature sized and it was like a contest to see who could run off the throttle plate first.  Very impressive.

 

I've never sought the opinion of others regarding this article but knowing the breath of knowledge among you Q guys I thought I'd reach out and see.

 

Thanks for taking the time.

Keith

N494K

 

 

 


Re: Your Opinion

Bruce McCormack
 

Is it similar to what Rain-X or Durapel does to your windshield?

On 2Jan, 2021, at 9:52, Keith Welsh <klw544@...> wrote:

Hello everyone,
I hope y'all had a great bringing in of the new year. 
 
I've attached an article I read about once every five years or so regarding carb icing. 
We all know about carb ice and the danger it poses.  I experienced it years ago in my then Aeronca Chief when, in the summer, the engine stopped producing power on final.  At least it would not throttle up when flaring to land and stopped on touchdown.  After setting a bit she started just fine...by hand propping of course. 
 
The highlighted area toward the end of the article gets my curiosity up and is what I would like your opinions on since many of you are much smarter than I.
The reason for asking is that somewhere in the 90's I had the throttle shaft, throttle plate and intake manifold teflon coated on my Quickie and this article is where it all started.
 
One hot humid day back then while looking down the carburetor with the engine running I was surprised at the amount of water that was forming on the throttle plate, the size of the droplets and the time it took for them to run off.  Onan carbs are on the top of the engine as most know.
I found a company in Indy that did industrial teflon coating, Keco Coatings, and they are still there and this is their website https://www.kecocoatings.com/coatings/teflon/
After the Teflon coating was done the water still formed but with a notable difference.  The droplets were miniature sized and it was like a contest to see who could run off the throttle plate first.  Very impressive.
 
I've never sought the opinion of others regarding this article but knowing the breath of knowledge among you Q guys I thought I'd reach out and see.
 
Thanks for taking the time.
Keith
N494K
 
 
 
<INDUCTION ICING STUDY.doc>


Your Opinion

 

Hello everyone,
I hope y'all had a great bringing in of the new year. 
 
I've attached an article I read about once every five years or so regarding carb icing. 
We all know about carb ice and the danger it poses.  I experienced it years ago in my then Aeronca Chief when, in the summer, the engine stopped producing power on final.  At least it would not throttle up when flaring to land and stopped on touchdown.  After setting a bit she started just fine...by hand propping of course. 
 
The highlighted area toward the end of the article gets my curiosity up and is what I would like your opinions on since many of you are much smarter than I.
The reason for asking is that somewhere in the 90's I had the throttle shaft, throttle plate and intake manifold teflon coated on my Quickie and this article is where it all started.
 
One hot humid day back then while looking down the carburetor with the engine running I was surprised at the amount of water that was forming on the throttle plate, the size of the droplets and the time it took for them to run off.  Onan carbs are on the top of the engine as most know.
I found a company in Indy that did industrial teflon coating, Keco Coatings, and they are still there and this is their website https://www.kecocoatings.com/coatings/teflon/
After the Teflon coating was done the water still formed but with a notable difference.  The droplets were miniature sized and it was like a contest to see who could run off the throttle plate first.  Very impressive.
 
I've never sought the opinion of others regarding this article but knowing the breath of knowledge among you Q guys I thought I'd reach out and see.
 
Thanks for taking the time.
Keith
N494K
 
 
 
_._,_._,_



Re: New Years Day Flight Report

Jay Scheevel
 

Great Pictures, Jim. Glad you were able to get in the air and meet up with Sam, and give us a little taste of the Sierra!  We used to call the wet snow out there, Sierra Sludge. Not sure if that is still a popular term.

 

Cheers,

Jay

 

From: main@Q-List.groups.io <main@Q-List.groups.io> On Behalf Of Jim Patillo
Sent: Friday, January 01, 2021 10:19 PM
To: main@Q-List.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Q-List] New Years Day Flight Report

 

On Fri, Jan 1, 2021 at 09:10 PM, Jim Patillo wrote:

Today was beautiful in the High Sierra. Wheels up at 10:00 am from Auburn, Ca. Temp was 51F. Wind down the runway. Taxied to RWY 7 for a departure east/southeast and into the mountains.  

Met up with Sam Kittle in his Mighty Luscombe hovering at 9000’ over Bear Valley 60 miles south. He brought along another friend, Larry in his RV.  We circled the area, admired then scenery and headed over to Calaveras, landing RWY13. The pictures are from Sam’s and Larry’s  planes.

Sam Invited me into the FBO for a good hot cup of coffee and conversation. I gave Kathy, the airport manager (whom I’ve known for a long time, she’s 80 now and still an active pilot) a hug and jumped in the plane for the trip back home. Departed the runway but stayed in the pattern for one fast pass. It was kinda quiet today so I wanted to wake the cows up. 

Landed Auburn about 20 minutes later, came home and had a cocktail. It was a fun ride. 

Jim
N46JP Q200


Re: New Years Day Flight Report

Dave Dugas
 

Great videos jay. You have beautiful scenery in them. 
Nice report also to both you and Jim Patillo.
I liked yours to Jerry....
I flew yesterday also and videoed it. I'll post my YouTube link once I get done editing it. 
Happy New Year
Dave D


On Fri, Jan 1, 2021 at 11:14 PM, Jay Scheevel
<jay@...> wrote:
Hi Mike,

Thanks. Happy New Year! I put that hot air duct in from the start of my building the cockpit but have not needed it yet. I live in a pretty dry climate, so not that unexpected but I figure when/if I do need it sometime I will be happy to have it. 

Cheers,
Jay




On Jan 1, 2021, at 8:12 PM, Mike Dwyer <q200pilot@...> wrote:


Great report Jay.  Really sharp videos too.  Have you ever had the canopy fog or freeze over.  I saw you had some kind of canopy heater.  It was way too windy here for fun flying.  Well done.
Mike

On Fri, Jan 1, 2021, 8:23 PM Jay Scheevel <jay@...> wrote:

Well, I finally have been able to take advantage of good weather on New Years Day and get a flight in. What a nice flight it was. Dead calm on the ground and very smooth in the air. A few degrees below freezing on take off in the early afternoon. We had some snow earlier in the week, so there was lots of snow around my airport, but taxiways and runway were clear and dry for nice takeoff and landing. When I first took off, I headed south to go over the Interstate (70), then over the Colorado river. It was a very nice view with the snow combined with the pink sandstone cliffs along the river. I made a partial turn with rudder only, holding my camera phone and taking short video while looking out the right side of the plane. I was surprised when I looked back at the ball and it seemed to be pretty coordinated using just rudder. Maybe I will try this more often. I then turned SE and followed the Colorado river, to the Junction of the Gunnison then along the Gunnison river canyon to about 40 miles southeast of Grand Junction and took another short video out the left side of the plane. The distant peaks are the West Elk mountains near Crested Butte and the large dark mountain is the Grand Mesa southeast of Grand Junction, which is a very scenic, flat topped mountain at 10,500’  I loaded the two short videos to YouTube. Hope you enjoy the flight as much as I did.

 

Cheers,

Jay Scheevel, Quickie Tri-Q2 N8WQ, 126 hours.

 

https://youtu.be/pxZejWwnXdU

https://youtu.be/dVV1EtykKIE

 


Re: New Years Day Flight Report

Jerry Marstall <jnmarstall@...>
 

Great ride. Thx Jim
My Q is down. Radio crapped out. Jan 1 will have to come later for me.


-------- Original message --------
From: Jim Patillo <Logistics_engineering@...>
Date: 1/2/21 12:10 AM (GMT-05:00)
To: main@Q-List.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Q-List] New Years Day Flight Report

Today was beautiful in the High Sierra. Wheels up at 10:00 am from Auburn, Ca. Temp was 51F. Wind down the runway. Taxied to RWY 7 for a departure east/southeast and into the mountains.  

Met up with Sam Kittle in his Mighty Luscombe hovering at 9000’ over Bear Valley 60 miles south. He brought along another friend, Larry in his RV.  We circled the area, admired then scenery and headed over to Calaveras, landing RWY13. The pictures are from Sam’s and Larry’s  planes.

Sam Invited me into the FBO for a good hot cup of coffee and conversation. I gave Kathy, the airport manager (whom I’ve known for a long time, she’s 80 now and still an active pilot) a hug and jumped in the plane for the trip back home. Departed the runway but stayed in the pattern for one fast pass. It was kinda quiet today so I wanted to wake the cows up. 

Landed Auburn about 20 minutes later, came home and had a cocktail. It was a fun ride. 

Jim
N46JP Q200


Re: New Years Day Flight Report

Jim Patillo
 

On Fri, Jan 1, 2021 at 09:10 PM, Jim Patillo wrote:

Today was beautiful in the High Sierra. Wheels up at 10:00 am from Auburn, Ca. Temp was 51F. Wind down the runway. Taxied to RWY 7 for a departure east/southeast and into the mountains.  

Met up with Sam Kittle in his Mighty Luscombe hovering at 9000’ over Bear Valley 60 miles south. He brought along another friend, Larry in his RV.  We circled the area, admired then scenery and headed over to Calaveras, landing RWY13. The pictures are from Sam’s and Larry’s  planes.

Sam Invited me into the FBO for a good hot cup of coffee and conversation. I gave Kathy, the airport manager (whom I’ve known for a long time, she’s 80 now and still an active pilot) a hug and jumped in the plane for the trip back home. Departed the runway but stayed in the pattern for one fast pass. It was kinda quiet today so I wanted to wake the cows up. 

Landed Auburn about 20 minutes later, came home and had a cocktail. It was a fun ride. 

Jim
N46JP Q200


Re: New Years Day Flight Report

Jim Patillo
 

Today was beautiful in the High Sierra. Wheels up at 10:00 am from Auburn, Ca. Temp was 51F. Wind down the runway. Taxied to RWY 7 for a departure east/southeast and into the mountains.  

Met up with Sam Kittle in his Mighty Luscombe hovering at 9000’ over Bear Valley 60 miles south. He brought along another friend, Larry in his RV.  We circled the area, admired then scenery and headed over to Calaveras, landing RWY13. The pictures are from Sam’s and Larry’s  planes.

Sam Invited me into the FBO for a good hot cup of coffee and conversation. I gave Kathy, the airport manager (whom I’ve known for a long time, she’s 80 now and still an active pilot) a hug and jumped in the plane for the trip back home. Departed the runway but stayed in the pattern for one fast pass. It was kinda quiet today so I wanted to wake the cows up. 

Landed Auburn about 20 minutes later, came home and had a cocktail. It was a fun ride. 

Jim
N46JP Q200


Re: New Years Day Flight Report

Jerry Marstall <jnmarstall@...>
 

Very nice! Jerry 

-------- Original message --------
From: Jay Scheevel <jay@...>
Date: 1/1/21 8:23 PM (GMT-05:00)
To: main@Q-List.groups.io
Subject: [Q-List] New Years Day Flight Report

Well, I finally have been able to take advantage of good weather on New Years Day and get a flight in. What a nice flight it was. Dead calm on the ground and very smooth in the air. A few degrees below freezing on take off in the early afternoon. We had some snow earlier in the week, so there was lots of snow around my airport, but taxiways and runway were clear and dry for nice takeoff and landing. When I first took off, I headed south to go over the Interstate (70), then over the Colorado river. It was a very nice view with the snow combined with the pink sandstone cliffs along the river. I made a partial turn with rudder only, holding my camera phone and taking short video while looking out the right side of the plane. I was surprised when I looked back at the ball and it seemed to be pretty coordinated using just rudder. Maybe I will try this more often. I then turned SE and followed the Colorado river, to the Junction of the Gunnison then along the Gunnison river canyon to about 40 miles southeast of Grand Junction and took another short video out the left side of the plane. The distant peaks are the West Elk mountains near Crested Butte and the large dark mountain is the Grand Mesa southeast of Grand Junction, which is a very scenic, flat topped mountain at 10,500’  I loaded the two short videos to YouTube. Hope you enjoy the flight as much as I did.

 

Cheers,

Jay Scheevel, Quickie Tri-Q2 N8WQ, 126 hours.

 

https://youtu.be/pxZejWwnXdU

https://youtu.be/dVV1EtykKIE

 


Re: New Years Day Flight Report

Jay Scheevel
 

Hi Mike,

Thanks. Happy New Year! I put that hot air duct in from the start of my building the cockpit but have not needed it yet. I live in a pretty dry climate, so not that unexpected but I figure when/if I do need it sometime I will be happy to have it. 

Cheers,
Jay




On Jan 1, 2021, at 8:12 PM, Mike Dwyer <q200pilot@...> wrote:


Great report Jay.  Really sharp videos too.  Have you ever had the canopy fog or freeze over.  I saw you had some kind of canopy heater.  It was way too windy here for fun flying.  Well done.
Mike

On Fri, Jan 1, 2021, 8:23 PM Jay Scheevel <jay@...> wrote:

Well, I finally have been able to take advantage of good weather on New Years Day and get a flight in. What a nice flight it was. Dead calm on the ground and very smooth in the air. A few degrees below freezing on take off in the early afternoon. We had some snow earlier in the week, so there was lots of snow around my airport, but taxiways and runway were clear and dry for nice takeoff and landing. When I first took off, I headed south to go over the Interstate (70), then over the Colorado river. It was a very nice view with the snow combined with the pink sandstone cliffs along the river. I made a partial turn with rudder only, holding my camera phone and taking short video while looking out the right side of the plane. I was surprised when I looked back at the ball and it seemed to be pretty coordinated using just rudder. Maybe I will try this more often. I then turned SE and followed the Colorado river, to the Junction of the Gunnison then along the Gunnison river canyon to about 40 miles southeast of Grand Junction and took another short video out the left side of the plane. The distant peaks are the West Elk mountains near Crested Butte and the large dark mountain is the Grand Mesa southeast of Grand Junction, which is a very scenic, flat topped mountain at 10,500’  I loaded the two short videos to YouTube. Hope you enjoy the flight as much as I did.

 

Cheers,

Jay Scheevel, Quickie Tri-Q2 N8WQ, 126 hours.

 

https://youtu.be/pxZejWwnXdU

https://youtu.be/dVV1EtykKIE

 


Re: New Years Day Flight Report

Mike Dwyer
 

Great report Jay.  Really sharp videos too.  Have you ever had the canopy fog or freeze over.  I saw you had some kind of canopy heater.  It was way too windy here for fun flying.  Well done.
Mike


On Fri, Jan 1, 2021, 8:23 PM Jay Scheevel <jay@...> wrote:

Well, I finally have been able to take advantage of good weather on New Years Day and get a flight in. What a nice flight it was. Dead calm on the ground and very smooth in the air. A few degrees below freezing on take off in the early afternoon. We had some snow earlier in the week, so there was lots of snow around my airport, but taxiways and runway were clear and dry for nice takeoff and landing. When I first took off, I headed south to go over the Interstate (70), then over the Colorado river. It was a very nice view with the snow combined with the pink sandstone cliffs along the river. I made a partial turn with rudder only, holding my camera phone and taking short video while looking out the right side of the plane. I was surprised when I looked back at the ball and it seemed to be pretty coordinated using just rudder. Maybe I will try this more often. I then turned SE and followed the Colorado river, to the Junction of the Gunnison then along the Gunnison river canyon to about 40 miles southeast of Grand Junction and took another short video out the left side of the plane. The distant peaks are the West Elk mountains near Crested Butte and the large dark mountain is the Grand Mesa southeast of Grand Junction, which is a very scenic, flat topped mountain at 10,500’  I loaded the two short videos to YouTube. Hope you enjoy the flight as much as I did.

 

Cheers,

Jay Scheevel, Quickie Tri-Q2 N8WQ, 126 hours.

 

https://youtu.be/pxZejWwnXdU

https://youtu.be/dVV1EtykKIE

 


New Years Day Flight Report

Jay Scheevel
 

Well, I finally have been able to take advantage of good weather on New Years Day and get a flight in. What a nice flight it was. Dead calm on the ground and very smooth in the air. A few degrees below freezing on take off in the early afternoon. We had some snow earlier in the week, so there was lots of snow around my airport, but taxiways and runway were clear and dry for nice takeoff and landing. When I first took off, I headed south to go over the Interstate (70), then over the Colorado river. It was a very nice view with the snow combined with the pink sandstone cliffs along the river. I made a partial turn with rudder only, holding my camera phone and taking short video while looking out the right side of the plane. I was surprised when I looked back at the ball and it seemed to be pretty coordinated using just rudder. Maybe I will try this more often. I then turned SE and followed the Colorado river, to the Junction of the Gunnison then along the Gunnison river canyon to about 40 miles southeast of Grand Junction and took another short video out the left side of the plane. The distant peaks are the West Elk mountains near Crested Butte and the large dark mountain is the Grand Mesa southeast of Grand Junction, which is a very scenic, flat topped mountain at 10,500’  I loaded the two short videos to YouTube. Hope you enjoy the flight as much as I did.

 

Cheers,

Jay Scheevel, Quickie Tri-Q2 N8WQ, 126 hours.

 

https://youtu.be/pxZejWwnXdU

https://youtu.be/dVV1EtykKIE

 


Re: Flight report

Richard Thomson
 

Hi Mike,  Glad to see you are still experimenting, thats what it is all about.

Great report. Thanks for the encouragement. I hope the New Year will be better than last.

Rich T.

On 30/12/2020 21:53, Mike Dwyer wrote:
I had some airplane projects to work on today so went to the airport to fix some things.  My Oil T on the last landing went bonkers.  I found a dirty connector, just unplugged it and plugged it back in.  Yes, easy.  My RPM digital gauge freaks out sometimes when I start the engine.  In the cockpit I can reach the 12v power connector and that makes it work again.  I added a 100uf cap to the power side to see if that would help.  It didn't.  I had started building an engine monitor device made with an Arduino and bluetooth device.  It collects the engine data and sends it to my Android tablet where I use the app called Torque to display the data.  I got the Voltage, Oil P, Oil T and RPM working so far.  Now onto the current sensors, EGT, CHT sensors.

To test the Engine monitor I got to at least start the engine, so let's go flying!  There is a cold front approaching and the wind is shifting from a North wind to a South wind tomorrow.  So I fire up and taxi to 36.  The wind is from 90 degrees at 16 gusting to 25, I'm paying attention.  After lift off I'm drifting to the left side of the runway so I crab more to the right.  No problem.  At about 200 feet I get slammed into the canopy due to turbulence.  I tighten my seatbelt all the way and had a brief thought that maybe this isn't the best day to go flying...  At 1000' I'm getting beat up but figure I might as well finish doing what I came for.  The Engine Monitor RPM is way low.  Needs a 4x multiplier.  The oil P is awesome and the Oil T needs a tweak.  I also brought my Camera and a gyro stabilizer to see if I can get some of the bumps and rolls out of my videos.  Let's just say that you don't really want one of these in the airplane.  Every time I turned or climbed, whatever, the thing tried pointing where it was originally.  Not the way I had envisioned it.  And my Stratux ADS-B in has quit working.  Probably from all that powering on and off that I had been doing on the ground.  Oh well, don't really need that anyway.

Back to the airport.  ATIS says the wind is still from 90 degrees and 16K.  I setup for a base to rwy 4, that's only a 50 degree right crosswind.  I've done worse.  Still getting pounded around as I turn final.  A firm arrival and on the brakes I make my turn off.  Survived again.

So far my Android engine monitor the Oil P and RPM work better than my older gauges.  The RPM is much more steady.  With the old digital RPM Meter it jumps around a fair amount.  I'm liking the new engine monitor with one flight under it's belt!

Fly Safe, and Happy New Year.
Mike Dwyer

Q200 Website: http://goo.gl/V8IrJF


Re: Flight report

 

You’re politically correct Jim, probably felt like a beating. Lol

Mike 


On Dec 30, 2020, at 9:23 PM, Paul Poulsen <paul.poulsen1957@...> wrote:


Well done again Mike :)
Thanks for the video, 8/8 cu with TS due tonight...and this is Summer :)
All the best
Paul

Virus-free. www.avg.com

On Thu, Dec 31, 2020 at 8:54 AM Mike Dwyer <q200pilot@...> wrote:
I had some airplane projects to work on today so went to the airport to fix some things.  My Oil T on the last landing went bonkers.  I found a dirty connector, just unplugged it and plugged it back in.  Yes, easy.  My RPM digital gauge freaks out sometimes when I start the engine.  In the cockpit I can reach the 12v power connector and that makes it work again.  I added a 100uf cap to the power side to see if that would help.  It didn't.  I had started building an engine monitor device made with an Arduino and bluetooth device.  It collects the engine data and sends it to my Android tablet where I use the app called Torque to display the data.  I got the Voltage, Oil P, Oil T and RPM working so far.  Now onto the current sensors, EGT, CHT sensors.

To test the Engine monitor I got to at least start the engine, so let's go flying!  There is a cold front approaching and the wind is shifting from a North wind to a South wind tomorrow.  So I fire up and taxi to 36.  The wind is from 90 degrees at 16 gusting to 25, I'm paying attention.  After lift off I'm drifting to the left side of the runway so I crab more to the right.  No problem.  At about 200 feet I get slammed into the canopy due to turbulence.  I tighten my seatbelt all the way and had a brief thought that maybe this isn't the best day to go flying...  At 1000' I'm getting beat up but figure I might as well finish doing what I came for.  The Engine Monitor RPM is way low.  Needs a 4x multiplier.  The oil P is awesome and the Oil T needs a tweak.  I also brought my Camera and a gyro stabilizer to see if I can get some of the bumps and rolls out of my videos.  Let's just say that you don't really want one of these in the airplane.  Every time I turned or climbed, whatever, the thing tried pointing where it was originally.  Not the way I had envisioned it.  And my Stratux ADS-B in has quit working.  Probably from all that powering on and off that I had been doing on the ground.  Oh well, don't really need that anyway.

Back to the airport.  ATIS says the wind is still from 90 degrees and 16K.  I setup for a base to rwy 4, that's only a 50 degree right crosswind.  I've done worse.  Still getting pounded around as I turn final.  A firm arrival and on the brakes I make my turn off.  Survived again.

So far my Android engine monitor the Oil P and RPM work better than my older gauges.  The RPM is much more steady.  With the old digital RPM Meter it jumps around a fair amount.  I'm liking the new engine monitor with one flight under it's belt!

Fly Safe, and Happy New Year.
Mike Dwyer

Q200 Website: http://goo.gl/V8IrJF



--


Virus-free. www.avg.com


Re: Flight report

Paul Poulsen
 

Well done again Mike :)
Thanks for the video, 8/8 cu with TS due tonight...and this is Summer :)
All the best
Paul

Virus-free. www.avg.com


On Thu, Dec 31, 2020 at 8:54 AM Mike Dwyer <q200pilot@...> wrote:
I had some airplane projects to work on today so went to the airport to fix some things.  My Oil T on the last landing went bonkers.  I found a dirty connector, just unplugged it and plugged it back in.  Yes, easy.  My RPM digital gauge freaks out sometimes when I start the engine.  In the cockpit I can reach the 12v power connector and that makes it work again.  I added a 100uf cap to the power side to see if that would help.  It didn't.  I had started building an engine monitor device made with an Arduino and bluetooth device.  It collects the engine data and sends it to my Android tablet where I use the app called Torque to display the data.  I got the Voltage, Oil P, Oil T and RPM working so far.  Now onto the current sensors, EGT, CHT sensors.

To test the Engine monitor I got to at least start the engine, so let's go flying!  There is a cold front approaching and the wind is shifting from a North wind to a South wind tomorrow.  So I fire up and taxi to 36.  The wind is from 90 degrees at 16 gusting to 25, I'm paying attention.  After lift off I'm drifting to the left side of the runway so I crab more to the right.  No problem.  At about 200 feet I get slammed into the canopy due to turbulence.  I tighten my seatbelt all the way and had a brief thought that maybe this isn't the best day to go flying...  At 1000' I'm getting beat up but figure I might as well finish doing what I came for.  The Engine Monitor RPM is way low.  Needs a 4x multiplier.  The oil P is awesome and the Oil T needs a tweak.  I also brought my Camera and a gyro stabilizer to see if I can get some of the bumps and rolls out of my videos.  Let's just say that you don't really want one of these in the airplane.  Every time I turned or climbed, whatever, the thing tried pointing where it was originally.  Not the way I had envisioned it.  And my Stratux ADS-B in has quit working.  Probably from all that powering on and off that I had been doing on the ground.  Oh well, don't really need that anyway.

Back to the airport.  ATIS says the wind is still from 90 degrees and 16K.  I setup for a base to rwy 4, that's only a 50 degree right crosswind.  I've done worse.  Still getting pounded around as I turn final.  A firm arrival and on the brakes I make my turn off.  Survived again.

So far my Android engine monitor the Oil P and RPM work better than my older gauges.  The RPM is much more steady.  With the old digital RPM Meter it jumps around a fair amount.  I'm liking the new engine monitor with one flight under it's belt!

Fly Safe, and Happy New Year.
Mike Dwyer

Q200 Website: http://goo.gl/V8IrJF



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Re: Flight report

Jim Patillo
 

Didn’t you mean to say”take a licking and keep on ticking”. It sounds much more civilized! Just sayin’😊

Jim
N46JP Q200


Sent from Outer Space


From: main@Q-List.groups.io <main@Q-List.groups.io> on behalf of Mike via groups.io <n7000t@...>
Sent: Wednesday, December 30, 2020 3:54:07 PM
To: main@q-list.groups.io <main@q-list.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [Q-List] Flight report
 
Good to hear she can take a beating and keep on ticking!   
Any chance of you putting out a video when your tablet is operating and to see how it looks?

Thanks 

Mike 


On Dec 30, 2020, at 1:54 PM, Mike Dwyer <q200pilot@...> wrote:


I had some airplane projects to work on today so went to the airport to fix some things.  My Oil T on the last landing went bonkers.  I found a dirty connector, just unplugged it and plugged it back in.  Yes, easy.  My RPM digital gauge freaks out sometimes when I start the engine.  In the cockpit I can reach the 12v power connector and that makes it work again.  I added a 100uf cap to the power side to see if that would help.  It didn't.  I had started building an engine monitor device made with an Arduino and bluetooth device.  It collects the engine data and sends it to my Android tablet where I use the app called Torque to display the data.  I got the Voltage, Oil P, Oil T and RPM working so far.  Now onto the current sensors, EGT, CHT sensors.

To test the Engine monitor I got to at least start the engine, so let's go flying!  There is a cold front approaching and the wind is shifting from a North wind to a South wind tomorrow.  So I fire up and taxi to 36.  The wind is from 90 degrees at 16 gusting to 25, I'm paying attention.  After lift off I'm drifting to the left side of the runway so I crab more to the right.  No problem.  At about 200 feet I get slammed into the canopy due to turbulence.  I tighten my seatbelt all the way and had a brief thought that maybe this isn't the best day to go flying...  At 1000' I'm getting beat up but figure I might as well finish doing what I came for.  The Engine Monitor RPM is way low.  Needs a 4x multiplier.  The oil P is awesome and the Oil T needs a tweak.  I also brought my Camera and a gyro stabilizer to see if I can get some of the bumps and rolls out of my videos.  Let's just say that you don't really want one of these in the airplane.  Every time I turned or climbed, whatever, the thing tried pointing where it was originally.  Not the way I had envisioned it.  And my Stratux ADS-B in has quit working.  Probably from all that powering on and off that I had been doing on the ground.  Oh well, don't really need that anyway.

Back to the airport.  ATIS says the wind is still from 90 degrees and 16K.  I setup for a base to rwy 4, that's only a 50 degree right crosswind.  I've done worse.  Still getting pounded around as I turn final.  A firm arrival and on the brakes I make my turn off.  Survived again.

So far my Android engine monitor the Oil P and RPM work better than my older gauges.  The RPM is much more steady.  With the old digital RPM Meter it jumps around a fair amount.  I'm liking the new engine monitor with one flight under it's belt!

Fly Safe, and Happy New Year.
Mike Dwyer

Q200 Website: http://goo.gl/V8IrJF


Re: Flight report

 

Good to hear she can take a beating and keep on ticking!   
Any chance of you putting out a video when your tablet is operating and to see how it looks?

Thanks 

Mike 


On Dec 30, 2020, at 1:54 PM, Mike Dwyer <q200pilot@...> wrote:


I had some airplane projects to work on today so went to the airport to fix some things.  My Oil T on the last landing went bonkers.  I found a dirty connector, just unplugged it and plugged it back in.  Yes, easy.  My RPM digital gauge freaks out sometimes when I start the engine.  In the cockpit I can reach the 12v power connector and that makes it work again.  I added a 100uf cap to the power side to see if that would help.  It didn't.  I had started building an engine monitor device made with an Arduino and bluetooth device.  It collects the engine data and sends it to my Android tablet where I use the app called Torque to display the data.  I got the Voltage, Oil P, Oil T and RPM working so far.  Now onto the current sensors, EGT, CHT sensors.

To test the Engine monitor I got to at least start the engine, so let's go flying!  There is a cold front approaching and the wind is shifting from a North wind to a South wind tomorrow.  So I fire up and taxi to 36.  The wind is from 90 degrees at 16 gusting to 25, I'm paying attention.  After lift off I'm drifting to the left side of the runway so I crab more to the right.  No problem.  At about 200 feet I get slammed into the canopy due to turbulence.  I tighten my seatbelt all the way and had a brief thought that maybe this isn't the best day to go flying...  At 1000' I'm getting beat up but figure I might as well finish doing what I came for.  The Engine Monitor RPM is way low.  Needs a 4x multiplier.  The oil P is awesome and the Oil T needs a tweak.  I also brought my Camera and a gyro stabilizer to see if I can get some of the bumps and rolls out of my videos.  Let's just say that you don't really want one of these in the airplane.  Every time I turned or climbed, whatever, the thing tried pointing where it was originally.  Not the way I had envisioned it.  And my Stratux ADS-B in has quit working.  Probably from all that powering on and off that I had been doing on the ground.  Oh well, don't really need that anyway.

Back to the airport.  ATIS says the wind is still from 90 degrees and 16K.  I setup for a base to rwy 4, that's only a 50 degree right crosswind.  I've done worse.  Still getting pounded around as I turn final.  A firm arrival and on the brakes I make my turn off.  Survived again.

So far my Android engine monitor the Oil P and RPM work better than my older gauges.  The RPM is much more steady.  With the old digital RPM Meter it jumps around a fair amount.  I'm liking the new engine monitor with one flight under it's belt!

Fly Safe, and Happy New Year.
Mike Dwyer

Q200 Website: http://goo.gl/V8IrJF


Flight report

Mike Dwyer
 

I had some airplane projects to work on today so went to the airport to fix some things.  My Oil T on the last landing went bonkers.  I found a dirty connector, just unplugged it and plugged it back in.  Yes, easy.  My RPM digital gauge freaks out sometimes when I start the engine.  In the cockpit I can reach the 12v power connector and that makes it work again.  I added a 100uf cap to the power side to see if that would help.  It didn't.  I had started building an engine monitor device made with an Arduino and bluetooth device.  It collects the engine data and sends it to my Android tablet where I use the app called Torque to display the data.  I got the Voltage, Oil P, Oil T and RPM working so far.  Now onto the current sensors, EGT, CHT sensors.

To test the Engine monitor I got to at least start the engine, so let's go flying!  There is a cold front approaching and the wind is shifting from a North wind to a South wind tomorrow.  So I fire up and taxi to 36.  The wind is from 90 degrees at 16 gusting to 25, I'm paying attention.  After lift off I'm drifting to the left side of the runway so I crab more to the right.  No problem.  At about 200 feet I get slammed into the canopy due to turbulence.  I tighten my seatbelt all the way and had a brief thought that maybe this isn't the best day to go flying...  At 1000' I'm getting beat up but figure I might as well finish doing what I came for.  The Engine Monitor RPM is way low.  Needs a 4x multiplier.  The oil P is awesome and the Oil T needs a tweak.  I also brought my Camera and a gyro stabilizer to see if I can get some of the bumps and rolls out of my videos.  Let's just say that you don't really want one of these in the airplane.  Every time I turned or climbed, whatever, the thing tried pointing where it was originally.  Not the way I had envisioned it.  And my Stratux ADS-B in has quit working.  Probably from all that powering on and off that I had been doing on the ground.  Oh well, don't really need that anyway.

Back to the airport.  ATIS says the wind is still from 90 degrees and 16K.  I setup for a base to rwy 4, that's only a 50 degree right crosswind.  I've done worse.  Still getting pounded around as I turn final.  A firm arrival and on the brakes I make my turn off.  Survived again.

So far my Android engine monitor the Oil P and RPM work better than my older gauges.  The RPM is much more steady.  With the old digital RPM Meter it jumps around a fair amount.  I'm liking the new engine monitor with one flight under it's belt!

Fly Safe, and Happy New Year.
Mike Dwyer

Q200 Website: http://goo.gl/V8IrJF


Re: Canard angle of incidence

Chris Walterson
 

Yes sir Mike, kinda far up north. i noticed in you photo, you had a paint booth.  Most of us are jealous. My shop was brand new before I started and it looks like a tornado ran through it now. This is my fourth composite--- Dragonfly, Super Quickie and Glass Goose.

Also lots of wisdom on this site , so don't be shy to  ask lots of questions.   Before I started flying and building I thought an aileron was someone from area 51.  Take care and enjoy the building---------  Chris


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