Date   

Re: Conditional inspections and checkouts

Fredd Baber
 

Sam,,

I don’t have any photos but I’ve seen the aircraft 149 times.  N58WH (or maybe it’s 85WH)???  Built by Rick Dyer.  Aircraft is disassembled and in his basement.  Engine removed and pickled since about 2010.  Had about 60 hours TT. 
Excellent workmanship.  He’s a great guy. Aircraft was built by him and would be reassembled by both of us so that I can be very familiar with it.  
VW engine (2185).  He disassembled when he lost his medical.  

Fredd Baber


On Mar 13, 2022, at 6:26 PM, Anthony P <solarant@...> wrote:

How does the LSA Inspection Authorization change the 4800 hours and exams passed needed to become an A&P?

I've heard of the LSA path, but have never gotten an answer on how it makes anything faster.

You can go to work for an A&P shop as an apprentice and work for 30 months and then study and pass the exams.

The local community college had an A&P program (36 months) but it got shut down.  Bad rumors.

National Aviation Academy says they can have an A&P certificate for me in 14 months and $38K!
They have a campus near me and one very near Mike Dwyer


--
Q2 N86KL


Re: Conditional inspections and checkouts

Anthony P
 

How does the LSA Inspection Authorization change the 4800 hours and exams passed needed to become an A&P?

I've heard of the LSA path, but have never gotten an answer on how it makes anything faster.

You can go to work for an A&P shop as an apprentice and work for 30 months and then study and pass the exams.

The local community college had an A&P program (36 months) but it got shut down.  Bad rumors.

National Aviation Academy says they can have an A&P certificate for me in 14 months and $38K!
They have a campus near me and one very near Mike Dwyer


--
Q2 N86KL


Re: Conditional inspections and checkouts

Sam Hoskins
 

Fredd, now that we have that legal understanding out of the way, we have some questions, like:

What is the current condition?  

When was the last time it flew?

How long has it been in storage?

What engine does it have?

Why is it apart?

Who is going to put it back together?

Is the current owner going to deliver a flying aircraft to you, or just a pile of parts?

Please provide photographs.

Sam




On Sun, Mar 13, 2022 at 4:57 AM Fredd Baber <freddb43@...> wrote:
Good morning,

Trying to be well informed before I buy…

Can the person who built the aircraft I’m buying (and holds the repairman certificate) continue to perform the conditional inspections even after I buy it or will I have to go to another licensed A&P?  In other words, is the owner of the repairman’s certificate only allowed to inspect an aircraft that they still own? 
Since the aircraft had an airworthiness certificate before it was disassembled and stored, will it need to go through another inspection and sign off once it’s rebuilt, including another 40 hours of “local” flight time before I can perform cross country flights?  Or is only required to have a sign off by the holder of the repairman’s certificate? 
Who can. I get a checkout I’m it from in the New England area?  I saw on another thread about two instructors but I thought they were more out west. 

Thanks all!!

Fredd Baber






Re: Conditional inspections and checkouts

Pat Weaver
 

Giid to know, I will look into it.


On Sun, Mar 13, 2022, 5:56 PM Jerry Marstall <jerrylm1986@...> wrote:
A local guy just completed the course at Blue Ridge Community College, Weyers Cave, VA.  4 parts online. 5th was a week of hands on.  Course $1900 ($1000 for vets) plus expenses for last week. For him, $2500 total.
He says Missouri folks wanted $6000 for course.
Jerry  M


On Sun, Mar 13, 2022, 5:34 PM Martin Skiby <mskiby@...> wrote:
Yes

Martin

 


On Mar 13, 2022, at 11:34 AM, Frankenbird Vern <smeshno1@...> wrote:


 All provided to you is correct information, Fredd.  You do need to have a chat with your local EMDO office person only if you intend to make changes that WILL affect your W&B or Operation Limitations. FAA District offices vary in opinion as to Phase 1 requirements. 
 
 Presuming you are retaining the same powerplant design (example: O-200 Continental), same propeller you would not have any further Phase 1 requirements. If you change from a VW based Q2 to an O-200  you will.  Some grey areas are still there but just keep the major components as theyare and you should be ok to go. 

 As for Mechanic certification.. here is an option now you might consider. Rainbow Aviation in Missouri offers LSA Inspection Authorization courses. YOU DO NOT have to own or operate an LSA aircraft to earn the rating.  If possible for you, this will permit you to perform Conditional Inspections on LSA aircraft (such as Aircoupe, and several other of the same type) to earn your "time as a performing mechanic" leading up to your writtens and practical on all three sections of the A&P rating.  This is a much faster track to an A&P Certification than when I did it, and a LOT less expensive.  It can also allow you to earn income to keep your own aviation activities because there is a large requirement for certificated LSA mechanics. 

 It is an option if you are so inclined, but one that the FAA has opened up to US citizens. It is well worth the time and cost to be trained in Missouri by Rainbow Aviation. Personally for me it was a great refresher, especially in Rotax engine work, which make up the bulk of the LSA powerplants.   

Vern   


From: main@Q-List.groups.io <main@Q-List.groups.io> on behalf of Fredd Baber <freddb43@...>
Sent: Sunday, March 13, 2022 4:57 AM
To: main@q-list.groups.io <main@q-list.groups.io>
Subject: [Q-List] Conditional inspections and checkouts
 
Good morning,

Trying to be well informed before I buy…

Can the person who built the aircraft I’m buying (and holds the repairman certificate) continue to perform the conditional inspections even after I buy it or will I have to go to another licensed A&P?  In other words, is the owner of the repairman’s certificate only allowed to inspect an aircraft that they still own? 
Since the aircraft had an airworthiness certificate before it was disassembled and stored, will it need to go through another inspection and sign off once it’s rebuilt, including another 40 hours of “local” flight time before I can perform cross country flights?  Or is only required to have a sign off by the holder of the repairman’s certificate? 
Who can. I get a checkout I’m it from in the New England area?  I saw on another thread about two instructors but I thought they were more out west. 

Thanks all!!

Fredd Baber






Re: Conditional inspections and checkouts

Jerry Marstall
 

A local guy just completed the course at Blue Ridge Community College, Weyers Cave, VA.  4 parts online. 5th was a week of hands on.  Course $1900 ($1000 for vets) plus expenses for last week. For him, $2500 total.
He says Missouri folks wanted $6000 for course.
Jerry  M


On Sun, Mar 13, 2022, 5:34 PM Martin Skiby <mskiby@...> wrote:
Yes

Martin

 


On Mar 13, 2022, at 11:34 AM, Frankenbird Vern <smeshno1@...> wrote:


 All provided to you is correct information, Fredd.  You do need to have a chat with your local EMDO office person only if you intend to make changes that WILL affect your W&B or Operation Limitations. FAA District offices vary in opinion as to Phase 1 requirements. 
 
 Presuming you are retaining the same powerplant design (example: O-200 Continental), same propeller you would not have any further Phase 1 requirements. If you change from a VW based Q2 to an O-200  you will.  Some grey areas are still there but just keep the major components as theyare and you should be ok to go. 

 As for Mechanic certification.. here is an option now you might consider. Rainbow Aviation in Missouri offers LSA Inspection Authorization courses. YOU DO NOT have to own or operate an LSA aircraft to earn the rating.  If possible for you, this will permit you to perform Conditional Inspections on LSA aircraft (such as Aircoupe, and several other of the same type) to earn your "time as a performing mechanic" leading up to your writtens and practical on all three sections of the A&P rating.  This is a much faster track to an A&P Certification than when I did it, and a LOT less expensive.  It can also allow you to earn income to keep your own aviation activities because there is a large requirement for certificated LSA mechanics. 

 It is an option if you are so inclined, but one that the FAA has opened up to US citizens. It is well worth the time and cost to be trained in Missouri by Rainbow Aviation. Personally for me it was a great refresher, especially in Rotax engine work, which make up the bulk of the LSA powerplants.   

Vern   


From: main@Q-List.groups.io <main@Q-List.groups.io> on behalf of Fredd Baber <freddb43@...>
Sent: Sunday, March 13, 2022 4:57 AM
To: main@q-list.groups.io <main@q-list.groups.io>
Subject: [Q-List] Conditional inspections and checkouts
 
Good morning,

Trying to be well informed before I buy…

Can the person who built the aircraft I’m buying (and holds the repairman certificate) continue to perform the conditional inspections even after I buy it or will I have to go to another licensed A&P?  In other words, is the owner of the repairman’s certificate only allowed to inspect an aircraft that they still own? 
Since the aircraft had an airworthiness certificate before it was disassembled and stored, will it need to go through another inspection and sign off once it’s rebuilt, including another 40 hours of “local” flight time before I can perform cross country flights?  Or is only required to have a sign off by the holder of the repairman’s certificate? 
Who can. I get a checkout I’m it from in the New England area?  I saw on another thread about two instructors but I thought they were more out west. 

Thanks all!!

Fredd Baber






Re: Conditional inspections and checkouts

Martin Skiby
 

Yes

Martin

 


On Mar 13, 2022, at 11:34 AM, Frankenbird Vern <smeshno1@...> wrote:


 All provided to you is correct information, Fredd.  You do need to have a chat with your local EMDO office person only if you intend to make changes that WILL affect your W&B or Operation Limitations. FAA District offices vary in opinion as to Phase 1 requirements. 
 
 Presuming you are retaining the same powerplant design (example: O-200 Continental), same propeller you would not have any further Phase 1 requirements. If you change from a VW based Q2 to an O-200  you will.  Some grey areas are still there but just keep the major components as theyare and you should be ok to go. 

 As for Mechanic certification.. here is an option now you might consider. Rainbow Aviation in Missouri offers LSA Inspection Authorization courses. YOU DO NOT have to own or operate an LSA aircraft to earn the rating.  If possible for you, this will permit you to perform Conditional Inspections on LSA aircraft (such as Aircoupe, and several other of the same type) to earn your "time as a performing mechanic" leading up to your writtens and practical on all three sections of the A&P rating.  This is a much faster track to an A&P Certification than when I did it, and a LOT less expensive.  It can also allow you to earn income to keep your own aviation activities because there is a large requirement for certificated LSA mechanics. 

 It is an option if you are so inclined, but one that the FAA has opened up to US citizens. It is well worth the time and cost to be trained in Missouri by Rainbow Aviation. Personally for me it was a great refresher, especially in Rotax engine work, which make up the bulk of the LSA powerplants.   

Vern   


From: main@Q-List.groups.io <main@Q-List.groups.io> on behalf of Fredd Baber <freddb43@...>
Sent: Sunday, March 13, 2022 4:57 AM
To: main@q-list.groups.io <main@q-list.groups.io>
Subject: [Q-List] Conditional inspections and checkouts
 
Good morning,

Trying to be well informed before I buy…

Can the person who built the aircraft I’m buying (and holds the repairman certificate) continue to perform the conditional inspections even after I buy it or will I have to go to another licensed A&P?  In other words, is the owner of the repairman’s certificate only allowed to inspect an aircraft that they still own? 
Since the aircraft had an airworthiness certificate before it was disassembled and stored, will it need to go through another inspection and sign off once it’s rebuilt, including another 40 hours of “local” flight time before I can perform cross country flights?  Or is only required to have a sign off by the holder of the repairman’s certificate? 
Who can. I get a checkout I’m it from in the New England area?  I saw on another thread about two instructors but I thought they were more out west. 

Thanks all!!

Fredd Baber






Re: Conditional inspections and checkouts

Fredd Baber
 

Thanks for the advice all!  Really appreciate it.

Fredd Baber


On Mar 13, 2022, at 2:34 PM, Frankenbird Vern <smeshno1@...> wrote:


 All provided to you is correct information, Fredd.  You do need to have a chat with your local EMDO office person only if you intend to make changes that WILL affect your W&B or Operation Limitations. FAA District offices vary in opinion as to Phase 1 requirements. 
 
 Presuming you are retaining the same powerplant design (example: O-200 Continental), same propeller you would not have any further Phase 1 requirements. If you change from a VW based Q2 to an O-200  you will.  Some grey areas are still there but just keep the major components as theyare and you should be ok to go. 

 As for Mechanic certification.. here is an option now you might consider. Rainbow Aviation in Missouri offers LSA Inspection Authorization courses. YOU DO NOT have to own or operate an LSA aircraft to earn the rating.  If possible for you, this will permit you to perform Conditional Inspections on LSA aircraft (such as Aircoupe, and several other of the same type) to earn your "time as a performing mechanic" leading up to your writtens and practical on all three sections of the A&P rating.  This is a much faster track to an A&P Certification than when I did it, and a LOT less expensive.  It can also allow you to earn income to keep your own aviation activities because there is a large requirement for certificated LSA mechanics. 

 It is an option if you are so inclined, but one that the FAA has opened up to US citizens. It is well worth the time and cost to be trained in Missouri by Rainbow Aviation. Personally for me it was a great refresher, especially in Rotax engine work, which make up the bulk of the LSA powerplants.   

Vern   


From: main@Q-List.groups.io <main@Q-List.groups.io> on behalf of Fredd Baber <freddb43@...>
Sent: Sunday, March 13, 2022 4:57 AM
To: main@q-list.groups.io <main@q-list.groups.io>
Subject: [Q-List] Conditional inspections and checkouts
 
Good morning,

Trying to be well informed before I buy…

Can the person who built the aircraft I’m buying (and holds the repairman certificate) continue to perform the conditional inspections even after I buy it or will I have to go to another licensed A&P?  In other words, is the owner of the repairman’s certificate only allowed to inspect an aircraft that they still own? 
Since the aircraft had an airworthiness certificate before it was disassembled and stored, will it need to go through another inspection and sign off once it’s rebuilt, including another 40 hours of “local” flight time before I can perform cross country flights?  Or is only required to have a sign off by the holder of the repairman’s certificate? 
Who can. I get a checkout I’m it from in the New England area?  I saw on another thread about two instructors but I thought they were more out west. 

Thanks all!!

Fredd Baber






Re: Conditional inspections and checkouts

Frankenbird Vern
 

 All provided to you is correct information, Fredd.  You do need to have a chat with your local EMDO office person only if you intend to make changes that WILL affect your W&B or Operation Limitations. FAA District offices vary in opinion as to Phase 1 requirements. 
 
 Presuming you are retaining the same powerplant design (example: O-200 Continental), same propeller you would not have any further Phase 1 requirements. If you change from a VW based Q2 to an O-200  you will.  Some grey areas are still there but just keep the major components as theyare and you should be ok to go. 

 As for Mechanic certification.. here is an option now you might consider. Rainbow Aviation in Missouri offers LSA Inspection Authorization courses. YOU DO NOT have to own or operate an LSA aircraft to earn the rating.  If possible for you, this will permit you to perform Conditional Inspections on LSA aircraft (such as Aircoupe, and several other of the same type) to earn your "time as a performing mechanic" leading up to your writtens and practical on all three sections of the A&P rating.  This is a much faster track to an A&P Certification than when I did it, and a LOT less expensive.  It can also allow you to earn income to keep your own aviation activities because there is a large requirement for certificated LSA mechanics. 

 It is an option if you are so inclined, but one that the FAA has opened up to US citizens. It is well worth the time and cost to be trained in Missouri by Rainbow Aviation. Personally for me it was a great refresher, especially in Rotax engine work, which make up the bulk of the LSA powerplants.   

Vern   


From: main@Q-List.groups.io <main@Q-List.groups.io> on behalf of Fredd Baber <freddb43@...>
Sent: Sunday, March 13, 2022 4:57 AM
To: main@q-list.groups.io <main@q-list.groups.io>
Subject: [Q-List] Conditional inspections and checkouts
 
Good morning,

Trying to be well informed before I buy…

Can the person who built the aircraft I’m buying (and holds the repairman certificate) continue to perform the conditional inspections even after I buy it or will I have to go to another licensed A&P?  In other words, is the owner of the repairman’s certificate only allowed to inspect an aircraft that they still own? 
Since the aircraft had an airworthiness certificate before it was disassembled and stored, will it need to go through another inspection and sign off once it’s rebuilt, including another 40 hours of “local” flight time before I can perform cross country flights?  Or is only required to have a sign off by the holder of the repairman’s certificate? 
Who can. I get a checkout I’m it from in the New England area?  I saw on another thread about two instructors but I thought they were more out west. 

Thanks all!!

Fredd Baber






Re: Conditional inspections and checkouts

Anthony P
 

Hi Fredd,

Where in New England are you and the plane?

I'm in southern NH.


--
Q2 N86KL


Re: Conditional inspections and checkouts

Sam Hoskins
 

The person who holds a repairman certificate for particular aircraft, holds that certificate for life unless they turn it back in. 

As long as there's no major changes to that aircraft, that repairman can sign off the annual condition inspection. Major changes would be, a different engine, converting from a tail dragger to a Tri Gear, things like that. I checked with my local physio when I went to all electronic ignition and they considered that a major change. They issued a new set of operating limitations for the aircraft. This will vary from district to district, depending on their whims.

By the way, I have an extensive inspection checklist listed in the files section of the Q-list. It's specifically for a tail dragger with a stock 0-200, but feel free to adapt it for whatever setup you have.


Sam

On Sun, Mar 13, 2022, 4:57 AM Fredd Baber <freddb43@...> wrote:
Good morning,

Trying to be well informed before I buy…

Can the person who built the aircraft I’m buying (and holds the repairman certificate) continue to perform the conditional inspections even after I buy it or will I have to go to another licensed A&P?  In other words, is the owner of the repairman’s certificate only allowed to inspect an aircraft that they still own? 
Since the aircraft had an airworthiness certificate before it was disassembled and stored, will it need to go through another inspection and sign off once it’s rebuilt, including another 40 hours of “local” flight time before I can perform cross country flights?  Or is only required to have a sign off by the holder of the repairman’s certificate? 
Who can. I get a checkout I’m it from in the New England area?  I saw on another thread about two instructors but I thought they were more out west. 

Thanks all!!

Fredd Baber






Re: Conditional inspections and checkouts

Mike Dwyer
 

I hold a repairman cert for my Q200.  It doesn't matter who owns the plane, I can do the condition inspection.

If you change the engine type, change a propeller type, ... Then you need to go to the fisdo for a new test period.  If you disassemble the plane but put back together without changes in the airframe that doesn't call for FAA involvement.

Just so you know, anyone can work on an experimental with a sign off from an AP mechanic.  AI not needed.  I've owned a couple of Experimentals that I didn't build.  Every year I'd do all the work and have an AP inspect and sign off on it for about $100.

I'm no law expert so the above is my understanding.  

Mike Dwyer Q200

On Sun, Mar 13, 2022, 5:57 AM Fredd Baber <freddb43@...> wrote:
Good morning,

Trying to be well informed before I buy…

Can the person who built the aircraft I’m buying (and holds the repairman certificate) continue to perform the conditional inspections even after I buy it or will I have to go to another licensed A&P?  In other words, is the owner of the repairman’s certificate only allowed to inspect an aircraft that they still own? 
Since the aircraft had an airworthiness certificate before it was disassembled and stored, will it need to go through another inspection and sign off once it’s rebuilt, including another 40 hours of “local” flight time before I can perform cross country flights?  Or is only required to have a sign off by the holder of the repairman’s certificate? 
Who can. I get a checkout I’m it from in the New England area?  I saw on another thread about two instructors but I thought they were more out west. 

Thanks all!!

Fredd Baber






Re: Conditional inspections and checkouts

Jon Finley
 

Hi Fred,

The holder of the repairman certificate can perform a condition inspection regardless of ownership. As you said, any A&P can also perform the condition inspection.

An aircraft goes thru the FAA/DAR inspection and is issued an airworthiness certificate once. As far as I am aware, there is no reason to go thru that process a second time. That includes typical changes such as avionics, engine, prop, etc. as well as major repairs such as a replacement wing/canard.  However; some of those changes may require you to put the aircraft back into phase 1 testing for a certain number of hours.  This is largely dependent on your operating limitations - the wording of them have evolved over the years.  The interpretation has also changed over the years. Of course, there is always a fair bit of confusion about the details and sometimes different information depending on who you talk to at the FAA. "Major change" is the key phrase in all of this and that generally means "significantly changes the W&B and/or the performance envelope of the aircraft." 

Given your description and assuming the aircraft completed phase 1 testing; I would guess that this aircraft needs only re-assembled and a condition inspection to be 'legal.' However; it is never that simple. I would treat any aircraft that I did not build as newly constructed and unproven aircraft. Disassembled/reassembled would make me even more suspect. Depending on the length of time that it is has been sitting, it may need lots of work (like an engine/carb overhaul, glass repairs, brake system overhaul, fuel system overhaul, etc.). None of this is a bad thing if you are looking for a project for the next year or two and with which you will become intimately familiar. On the other hand, if you are looking to tighten up a couple bolts and fly across the US, well... probably not a good thing.

Jon Finley
Flying an RV-4 - Truth or Consequences, NM


Conditional inspections and checkouts

Fredd Baber
 

Good morning,

Trying to be well informed before I buy…

Can the person who built the aircraft I’m buying (and holds the repairman certificate) continue to perform the conditional inspections even after I buy it or will I have to go to another licensed A&P? In other words, is the owner of the repairman’s certificate only allowed to inspect an aircraft that they still own?
Since the aircraft had an airworthiness certificate before it was disassembled and stored, will it need to go through another inspection and sign off once it’s rebuilt, including another 40 hours of “local” flight time before I can perform cross country flights? Or is only required to have a sign off by the holder of the repairman’s certificate?
Who can. I get a checkout I’m it from in the New England area? I saw on another thread about two instructors but I thought they were more out west.

Thanks all!!

Fredd Baber


Re: Quickie insurance

Jay Scheevel
 

That's a good one, Keith. Made me laugh!

Cheers,
Jay

-----Original Message-----
From: main@Q-List.groups.io <main@Q-List.groups.io> On Behalf Of Keith Welsh
Sent: Saturday, March 12, 2022 3:08 PM
To: main@Q-List.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Q-List] Quickie insurance

A little off subject…but while on the subject.
I had a conversation once with Avemco about my liability coverage on the Q1. With $300,000 liability I wondered about increasing it to $1,000,000 (my ins agent wifee told me to do that). The Avemco agent told me that he knew what a Quickie was and that besides killing myself how much other damage could it do. He said to just make sure to fly it into a brick building or something and that $300,000 liability coverage was plenty for a Quickie.
Keith


---------- Original Message ----------
From: "Martin Skiby" <mskiby@...>
To: main@q-list.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Q-List] Quickie insurance
Date: Sat, 12 Mar 2022 13:25:23 -0800

Find a non controlled airport to test fly it from. That’s an easy solution. Always worked for us.

Martin


On Mar 12, 2022, at 1:21 PM, Robert Cringely <bob@...> wrote:

Don't buy the airplane, buy the LLC that owns it. No sales tax for one and reduced liability as you note.


On Sat, Mar 12, 2022 at 11:56 AM Pat Weaver <pweaver311@...> wrote:
I ran into the same issues. I noticed the previous owner had his aircraft in his LLC. I am assuming the reason being that if anything happened in his experimental aircraft they could only come back on the LLC and not his personal property? May not be a bad idea.
On Sat, Mar 12, 2022, 2:32 PM Chris Walterson <dkeats@...> wrote:
I'm in Canada so it doesn't apply to most of you, but my insurance is around 600 bucks per year for basic coverage. No hull. The best thing is it is my insurance and not the airplane insurance. The company I deal with insures me for basic coverage so I can fly most small airplanes and still be covered for basic. Because I have more than one airplane I can use the same policy to cover them, plus, anyone with a pilots license living under the same roof is also covered. My wife flew back then so it worked out well.

For another 100 bucks I get Liability coverage on my hanger.

When I first test flew my Dragonfly, I saw that I needed 150 hrs to do the testing. They mentioned "type" but figured on a 150 Cessna if you push forward you go down and pull back you go up, so it is the same type as the Dragonfly . That was thirty years ago and it worked out well, mind you I did taxi a whole bunch. In the states you need a tail dragger rating in Canada, you just need big balls.

The question is, what does type really mean? I used to ride a KZ1000 turbocharged and also a 60 CC Yamaha with my standard motorcyle license. My A license let me drive a pulp truck with 220,000 lbs gross and a basic truck/ trailer with air brakes.

My approach may not be for everyone. Take care--------------- Chris


--
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus


Re: Quickie insurance

Pat Weaver
 

That's actually good advice! 😁


On Sat, Mar 12, 2022, 5:34 PM Robert Cringely <bob@...> wrote:
By the same token, Waldo Waterman once told me that when having a forced landing in an orchard, aim for a peach tree. They have shorter lives and are cheaper to replace. Waldo had better eyes than I do. 

On Sat, Mar 12, 2022 at 2:07 PM Keith Welsh <kw544@...> wrote:
A little off subject…but while on the subject.
I had a conversation once with Avemco about my liability coverage on the Q1.  With $300,000 liability I wondered about increasing it to $1,000,000 (my ins agent wifee told me to do that).  The Avemco agent told me that he knew what a Quickie was and that besides killing myself how much other damage could it do.  He said to just make sure to fly it into a brick building or something and that $300,000 liability coverage was plenty for a Quickie.
Keith


---------- Original Message ----------
From: "Martin Skiby" <mskiby@...>
To: main@q-list.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Q-List] Quickie insurance
Date: Sat, 12 Mar 2022 13:25:23 -0800

Find a non controlled airport to test fly it from.  That’s an easy solution.   Always worked for us. 

Martin


On Mar 12, 2022, at 1:21 PM, Robert Cringely <bob@...> wrote:

Don't buy the airplane, buy the LLC that owns it. No sales tax for one and reduced liability as you note.


On Sat, Mar 12, 2022 at 11:56 AM Pat Weaver <pweaver311@...> wrote:
I ran into the same issues. I noticed the previous owner had his aircraft in his LLC. I am assuming the reason being that if anything happened in his experimental aircraft they could only come back on the LLC and not his personal property? May not be a bad idea.
On Sat, Mar 12, 2022, 2:32 PM Chris Walterson <dkeats@...> wrote:
  I'm in Canada so it doesn't apply to most of you, but my insurance is
around 600 bucks per year for basic coverage. No hull. The best thing is
it is my insurance and not the airplane insurance. The company I deal
with insures me for basic coverage so I can fly most small airplanes and
still be covered for basic. Because I have more than one airplane I can
use the same policy to cover them, plus, anyone with a pilots license
living under the same roof is also covered.  My wife flew back then so
it worked out well.

  For another 100 bucks I get Liability coverage on my hanger.

When I first test flew my Dragonfly, I saw that I needed 150 hrs to do
the testing. They mentioned "type" but  figured on a 150 Cessna if you
push forward you go down and pull back you go up, so it is the same type
as the Dragonfly . That was thirty years ago and it worked out well,
mind you I did taxi a whole bunch. In the states you need a tail dragger
rating in Canada, you just need big balls.

  The question is, what does type really mean?  I used to ride a KZ1000
turbocharged and also a 60 CC Yamaha with my standard motorcyle
license.  My A license let me drive a pulp truck with 220,000 lbs gross
and a basic truck/ trailer with air brakes.

  My approach may not be for everyone.  Take care--------------- Chris


--
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus
























Re: Quickie insurance

Robert Cringely
 

By the same token, Waldo Waterman once told me that when having a forced landing in an orchard, aim for a peach tree. They have shorter lives and are cheaper to replace. Waldo had better eyes than I do. 


On Sat, Mar 12, 2022 at 2:07 PM Keith Welsh <kw544@...> wrote:
A little off subject…but while on the subject.
I had a conversation once with Avemco about my liability coverage on the Q1.  With $300,000 liability I wondered about increasing it to $1,000,000 (my ins agent wifee told me to do that).  The Avemco agent told me that he knew what a Quickie was and that besides killing myself how much other damage could it do.  He said to just make sure to fly it into a brick building or something and that $300,000 liability coverage was plenty for a Quickie.
Keith


---------- Original Message ----------
From: "Martin Skiby" <mskiby@...>
To: main@q-list.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Q-List] Quickie insurance
Date: Sat, 12 Mar 2022 13:25:23 -0800

Find a non controlled airport to test fly it from.  That’s an easy solution.   Always worked for us. 

Martin


On Mar 12, 2022, at 1:21 PM, Robert Cringely <bob@...> wrote:

Don't buy the airplane, buy the LLC that owns it. No sales tax for one and reduced liability as you note.


On Sat, Mar 12, 2022 at 11:56 AM Pat Weaver <pweaver311@...> wrote:
I ran into the same issues. I noticed the previous owner had his aircraft in his LLC. I am assuming the reason being that if anything happened in his experimental aircraft they could only come back on the LLC and not his personal property? May not be a bad idea.
On Sat, Mar 12, 2022, 2:32 PM Chris Walterson <dkeats@...> wrote:
  I'm in Canada so it doesn't apply to most of you, but my insurance is
around 600 bucks per year for basic coverage. No hull. The best thing is
it is my insurance and not the airplane insurance. The company I deal
with insures me for basic coverage so I can fly most small airplanes and
still be covered for basic. Because I have more than one airplane I can
use the same policy to cover them, plus, anyone with a pilots license
living under the same roof is also covered.  My wife flew back then so
it worked out well.

  For another 100 bucks I get Liability coverage on my hanger.

When I first test flew my Dragonfly, I saw that I needed 150 hrs to do
the testing. They mentioned "type" but  figured on a 150 Cessna if you
push forward you go down and pull back you go up, so it is the same type
as the Dragonfly . That was thirty years ago and it worked out well,
mind you I did taxi a whole bunch. In the states you need a tail dragger
rating in Canada, you just need big balls.

  The question is, what does type really mean?  I used to ride a KZ1000
turbocharged and also a 60 CC Yamaha with my standard motorcyle
license.  My A license let me drive a pulp truck with 220,000 lbs gross
and a basic truck/ trailer with air brakes.

  My approach may not be for everyone.  Take care--------------- Chris


--
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus
























Re: Quickie insurance

 

A little off subject…but while on the subject.
I had a conversation once with Avemco about my liability coverage on the Q1. With $300,000 liability I wondered about increasing it to $1,000,000 (my ins agent wifee told me to do that). The Avemco agent told me that he knew what a Quickie was and that besides killing myself how much other damage could it do. He said to just make sure to fly it into a brick building or something and that $300,000 liability coverage was plenty for a Quickie.
Keith

---------- Original Message ----------
From: "Martin Skiby" <mskiby@...>
To: main@q-list.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Q-List] Quickie insurance
Date: Sat, 12 Mar 2022 13:25:23 -0800

Find a non controlled airport to test fly it from. That’s an easy solution. Always worked for us.

Martin


On Mar 12, 2022, at 1:21 PM, Robert Cringely <bob@...> wrote:

Don't buy the airplane, buy the LLC that owns it. No sales tax for one and reduced liability as you note.


On Sat, Mar 12, 2022 at 11:56 AM Pat Weaver <pweaver311@...> wrote:
I ran into the same issues. I noticed the previous owner had his aircraft in his LLC. I am assuming the reason being that if anything happened in his experimental aircraft they could only come back on the LLC and not his personal property? May not be a bad idea.
On Sat, Mar 12, 2022, 2:32 PM Chris Walterson <dkeats@...> wrote:
I'm in Canada so it doesn't apply to most of you, but my insurance is
around 600 bucks per year for basic coverage. No hull. The best thing is
it is my insurance and not the airplane insurance. The company I deal
with insures me for basic coverage so I can fly most small airplanes and
still be covered for basic. Because I have more than one airplane I can
use the same policy to cover them, plus, anyone with a pilots license
living under the same roof is also covered. My wife flew back then so
it worked out well.

For another 100 bucks I get Liability coverage on my hanger.

When I first test flew my Dragonfly, I saw that I needed 150 hrs to do
the testing. They mentioned "type" but figured on a 150 Cessna if you
push forward you go down and pull back you go up, so it is the same type
as the Dragonfly . That was thirty years ago and it worked out well,
mind you I did taxi a whole bunch. In the states you need a tail dragger
rating in Canada, you just need big balls.

The question is, what does type really mean? I used to ride a KZ1000
turbocharged and also a 60 CC Yamaha with my standard motorcyle
license. My A license let me drive a pulp truck with 220,000 lbs gross
and a basic truck/ trailer with air brakes.

My approach may not be for everyone. Take care--------------- Chris


--
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus


Re: Quickie insurance

 

A little off subject…but while on the subject.
I had a conversation once with Avemco about my liability coverage on the Q1. With $300,000 liability I wondered about increasing it to $1,000,000 (my ins agent wifee told me to do that). The Avemco agent told me that he knew what a Quickie was and that besides killing myself how much other damage could it do. He said to just make sure to fly it into a brick building or something and that $300,000 liability coverage was plenty for a Quickie.
Keith

---------- Original Message ----------
From: "Martin Skiby" <mskiby@...>
To: main@q-list.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Q-List] Quickie insurance
Date: Sat, 12 Mar 2022 13:25:23 -0800

Find a non controlled airport to test fly it from. That’s an easy solution. Always worked for us.

Martin


On Mar 12, 2022, at 1:21 PM, Robert Cringely <bob@...> wrote:

Don't buy the airplane, buy the LLC that owns it. No sales tax for one and reduced liability as you note.


On Sat, Mar 12, 2022 at 11:56 AM Pat Weaver <pweaver311@...> wrote:
I ran into the same issues. I noticed the previous owner had his aircraft in his LLC. I am assuming the reason being that if anything happened in his experimental aircraft they could only come back on the LLC and not his personal property? May not be a bad idea.
On Sat, Mar 12, 2022, 2:32 PM Chris Walterson <dkeats@...> wrote:
I'm in Canada so it doesn't apply to most of you, but my insurance is
around 600 bucks per year for basic coverage. No hull. The best thing is
it is my insurance and not the airplane insurance. The company I deal
with insures me for basic coverage so I can fly most small airplanes and
still be covered for basic. Because I have more than one airplane I can
use the same policy to cover them, plus, anyone with a pilots license
living under the same roof is also covered. My wife flew back then so
it worked out well.

For another 100 bucks I get Liability coverage on my hanger.

When I first test flew my Dragonfly, I saw that I needed 150 hrs to do
the testing. They mentioned "type" but figured on a 150 Cessna if you
push forward you go down and pull back you go up, so it is the same type
as the Dragonfly . That was thirty years ago and it worked out well,
mind you I did taxi a whole bunch. In the states you need a tail dragger
rating in Canada, you just need big balls.

The question is, what does type really mean? I used to ride a KZ1000
turbocharged and also a 60 CC Yamaha with my standard motorcyle
license. My A license let me drive a pulp truck with 220,000 lbs gross
and a basic truck/ trailer with air brakes.

My approach may not be for everyone. Take care--------------- Chris


--
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus


Re: Quickie insurance

Martin Skiby
 

Find a non controlled airport to test fly it from.  That’s an easy solution.   Always worked for us.  

Martin

 


On Mar 12, 2022, at 1:21 PM, Robert Cringely <bob@...> wrote:


Don't buy the airplane, buy the LLC that owns it. No sales tax for one and reduced liability as you note.



On Sat, Mar 12, 2022 at 11:56 AM Pat Weaver <pweaver311@...> wrote:
I ran into the same issues. I noticed the previous owner had his aircraft in his LLC. I am assuming the reason being that if anything happened in his experimental aircraft they could only come back on the LLC and not his personal property? May not be a bad idea.

On Sat, Mar 12, 2022, 2:32 PM Chris Walterson <dkeats@...> wrote:
  I'm in Canada so it doesn't apply to most of you, but my insurance is
around 600 bucks per year for basic coverage. No hull. The best thing is
it is my insurance and not the airplane insurance. The company I deal
with insures me for basic coverage so I can fly most small airplanes and
still be covered for basic. Because I have more than one airplane I can
use the same policy to cover them, plus, anyone with a pilots license
living under the same roof is also covered.  My wife flew back then so
it worked out well.

  For another 100 bucks I get Liability coverage on my hanger.

When I first test flew my Dragonfly, I saw that I needed 150 hrs to do
the testing. They mentioned "type" but  figured on a 150 Cessna if you
push forward you go down and pull back you go up, so it is the same type
as the Dragonfly . That was thirty years ago and it worked out well,
mind you I did taxi a whole bunch. In the states you need a tail dragger
rating in Canada, you just need big balls.

  The question is, what does type really mean?  I used to ride a KZ1000
turbocharged and also a 60 CC Yamaha with my standard motorcyle
license.  My A license let me drive a pulp truck with 220,000 lbs gross
and a basic truck/ trailer with air brakes.

  My approach may not be for everyone.  Take care--------------- Chris


--
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus







Re: Quickie insurance

Robert Cringely
 

Don't buy the airplane, buy the LLC that owns it. No sales tax for one and reduced liability as you note.



On Sat, Mar 12, 2022 at 11:56 AM Pat Weaver <pweaver311@...> wrote:
I ran into the same issues. I noticed the previous owner had his aircraft in his LLC. I am assuming the reason being that if anything happened in his experimental aircraft they could only come back on the LLC and not his personal property? May not be a bad idea.

On Sat, Mar 12, 2022, 2:32 PM Chris Walterson <dkeats@...> wrote:
  I'm in Canada so it doesn't apply to most of you, but my insurance is
around 600 bucks per year for basic coverage. No hull. The best thing is
it is my insurance and not the airplane insurance. The company I deal
with insures me for basic coverage so I can fly most small airplanes and
still be covered for basic. Because I have more than one airplane I can
use the same policy to cover them, plus, anyone with a pilots license
living under the same roof is also covered.  My wife flew back then so
it worked out well.

  For another 100 bucks I get Liability coverage on my hanger.

When I first test flew my Dragonfly, I saw that I needed 150 hrs to do
the testing. They mentioned "type" but  figured on a 150 Cessna if you
push forward you go down and pull back you go up, so it is the same type
as the Dragonfly . That was thirty years ago and it worked out well,
mind you I did taxi a whole bunch. In the states you need a tail dragger
rating in Canada, you just need big balls.

  The question is, what does type really mean?  I used to ride a KZ1000
turbocharged and also a 60 CC Yamaha with my standard motorcyle
license.  My A license let me drive a pulp truck with 220,000 lbs gross
and a basic truck/ trailer with air brakes.

  My approach may not be for everyone.  Take care--------------- Chris


--
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus






1501 - 1520 of 55478