Date   

Re: Intake Elbow

Deems Herring
 

Bruce,
Once TCM started making the ones with the bosses on them that became the only kind they make. If you order new ones for any of the small continentals you will get the kind you have. You need to find some used ones. I know the 75, 85 and 90 ones will fit right in place, I am not 100% sure that the A 65 ones have the same internal size. They show up on ebay and barnstormers quite often and you can usually get them for less than what people pay for the O-200 ones for some reason. It seems obvious but when buying used make sure they are selling 2 for cylinders 1 & 4 and 2 for cylinders 2 & 3 (don't ask me why I mention that).

Deems

----- Original Message ----
From: "jcrain2@..." <jcrain2@...>
To: Q-LIST@...
Sent: Tuesday, February 19, 2008 8:42:20 PM
Subject: Re: [Q-LIST] Intake Elbow














Thanks Deems,

So I could just order elbows for say a C90 and the amount of air flow and the bolt holes would be the exact same as the 0200? Without the little extra knuckles for an injection system.

Bruce Crain



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Re: Tri Q Rudder Cables

Ron Weiss <ronweiss4@...>
 

--Thanks Mark....I guess no one out there has a flying Quickie? Ron-
In Q-LIST@..., "Ron Weiss" <ronweiss4@...> wrote:

Hey Guy's,
Just curious to know how the rudder linkage works in an
open
system attached to the firewall with springs?
According to the Tri Q manuel, the system is open and not a 'pull
pull' which is what I'm used to. With the cables running through
nyloflex tubing and bending slightly in a few areas, I encountered
some
resistance. No matter how I hooked up the cables and springs, the
pedals felt weird!
My solution was to close out the system with pulley's and cable
to
make it a pull pull arrangement. This feels much better to me and
seems
a safer system all around.
I left the springs in place with just enough tension to center
the
rudder. I'm much happier with this system, but , interested in how
some
of you are setting yours up and how they work?
Ron


Flight contol - corrosion inspection

fitzair4@...
 

To Q-Group

Some? inspection tips for Quickie builders and pilots.

?After 25+ years of working on them, Corrosion is a very big problem
on the rudders, elevators and ailerons. Water on the outside?surface of the fuselage, will get into them.

Worked on projects, the builders didn't work on for many years. They never
epoxy primed painted the outside?or seal coated the inside of the tubing before assembling.
Disassembling these corroded controls took a long time, to keep from damaging them.
Had to replaced them.

For the pilots that have time on their Q2, during your annual inspection. Remove the rudder and
check the CSA10 bellcrank?into the CS21. Aileron controls CS 11 into CS9, Elevators CSA8 into CS16.
Check them for wear and corrosion.
This is also the time to replace the flange steel bearings QCSM4 and QCSM6?with Oil lite bronze bearings.
Steel on steel with no lube is bad wear and corrosion. Take them to any local bearing supplier for replacements.

Don't take a spray can to lube your controls. Put?the oil?on a Q tip and apply it. Over spray will go where
you don't want it.

As some of you know that live near a ocean. Salt is in the air. Over a year ago, there was a complaint
about Canard alum lift tabs corrosion. They complain about it 15 years after they received it.

I worked for 11 years at
OMC engineering, 1969 to 1980. We had one Paint Research Dept next to our Stress Lab. We sent out sample to test stations, one
in Stuart, Fla. The experimental test to find the right paint, was a very interesting study. I talked to Scott Swing
about his problems, at his Velocity location.. He told me that if they leave any untreated metal out side for one day,
corrosions starts very fast. Just store anything from your projects in a very dry inveriment.

I still like white epoxy primers for the outside surfaces. Better protection from UL & direct sun light? heat,
on any assembly that is left in a bad location and you forgot about it..

Don,t store your composite assemblies in the attic of a building. The temps, will get over 140 Deg F.

Last Saturday I attended for the 16th time,?our yearly Wisconsin?IA & A&P seminar. Many interesting tips
on engine care to write up about on?at another E-mail some day. Was attended by over 340 Mechanics,?Aircraft MFG
and FAA. There was a 1 1/2 hour talk from a Lawyer, about aircraft maintenance liability. At the Seminar, there was very few people there under 45 years old. After his talk, it is very obvious why being a A & P is a dying trade. Last year was 405 there in attendance.??? http://www.dot.wisconsin.gov/news/docs/mech-agenda.pdf

We have two sets of Tri-Q wheel, brakes, tires, tubes, axles assemblies and wheel pants in storage, never installed.
Many other assemblies listed in our web site.

www.fitzair.net

Larry Fitzgerald

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

-----Original Message-----
From: Dave Dugas <davedq2@...>
To: Q-LIST@...
Sent: Mon, 18 Feb 2008 9:59 am
Subject: Re: [Q-LIST] Elevator Binding






Lynn and Jon,
I routinely check the outboard pivots too. I discovered the left outboard pivot loosened, so I removed my elevators and checked everything. The center pivots were fine, but both outboard pivots needed tightening. I think they may have worked loose because a small amount of corrosion was found on the pivot. I believe it was caused by water from rain or washing/rinsing, running downhill to that point, and causing the pivot to seize a little, eventually loosening the pivot bolt. after tightening, I used a heavy grease on both the outboard and inboard pivots. When I originally assembled them, I just used a thin spray oil to lube them. I think that the grease will protect much better. There is enough flex in the elevator to easily see if the pivots are loose, like Jon says, by pushing up and down on the elevator at these points.
Dave D


LJFrench <LJFrench@...> wrote:
Jon,
Thanks for the info.
Do you think you would have been able to detect this loose pin during a
preflight by trying to move the elevator up and down in the vicinity of the
attachment?
Thanks
LF
----- Original Message -----
From: "Jon Finley" <jon@...>
To: <Q-LIST@...>
Sent: Sunday, February 17, 2008 11:30 AM
Subject: RE: [Q-LIST] Elevator Binding

Hi Lynn,

Nothing helpful, just some comments...

I just had me elevators off for my condition inspection. My center pivot
pins were slightly loose but no where close to falling out or being
dangerous (my opinion). When installing my elevators (with the plane on
it's gear), the alignment of the center pin is pretty close to right on.
While reinstalling, I did have a question about lateral freeplay in the
elevator pivot assembly and found that the plans call for .05" for the GU
canard (page 10-10, item #9 on that page).

Jon

-----Original Message-----
From: Q-LIST@... [mailto:Q-LIST@...]On Behalf Of
LJFrench
Sent: Saturday, February 16, 2008 11:07 AM
To: Q-LIST@...
Subject: Re: [Q-LIST] Elevator Binding


I would think the area you mention on the bracket would be the most
suseptable to failure and that the hinge pin would be the most likely
thing
to start working loose on the elevator. It is hard for me to understand
why
we have not seen more problems in this area. Maybe it is a better design
than appears on the surface. I had considered a slight vertical slot in
the
backet to allow for the flexing of the elevator torque tube, but that
seems
to have questions in my mind as well.

Has anyone else experienced issues in this area or seen any variations of
attachment?

LJ French


----- Original Message -----
From: "Brad/Iris Baerg" <brirbrg@...>
To: <Q-LIST@...>
Sent: Friday, February 15, 2008 11:33 PM
Subject: Re: [Q-LIST] Elevator Binding


Group
I've seen one centre bracket failure (cs?). It broke at the part of the
bracket where it narrows to clear the elevator tube.
The problem was discovered on the pre-flight, so it was not known if it
occurred in flight or on the last landing.
That centre mount should definitely be on every checklist .

Brad
Tri-Q
CGTA
---------------------------------
Looking for last minute shopping deals? Find them fast with Yahoo! Search.







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Re: Fillet rule of thumb?

Peter Harris <peterjfharris@...>
 

Is there any value in making a fillet at the LE joint with the hull?

Peter



_____

From: Q-LIST@... [mailto:Q-LIST@...] On Behalf Of
larry severson
Sent: Thursday, 21 February 2008 2:19 AM
To: Q-LIST@...
Subject: Re: [Q-LIST] Re: Fillet rule of thumb?



At 06:24 AM 2/20/2008, you wrote:

It occurred to me that all this discussion has been entertaining for
all of us non-engineers and that for (maybe) the vast majority of
"us" a fillet is an esthetic thing, but you serous guys are serious.
Hope it helps you squeeze an additional tenth of a knot out of her, Sammy.
It will do a lot more than that. Any fuselage/wing join greater than
60 degrees creates HIGH drag.

Larry Severson
Fountain Valley, CA 92708
(714) 968-9852
larry2@socal. <mailto:larry2%40socal.rr.com> rr.com


Re: Q1 Hydraulic Brakes - advice please

Stan Susman <stanpfa@...>
 

Many years ago Dick Rutan put 1/16 stainless tubing inside his old nylo-flow tubeing and the brakes worked fine. I have the 25 year old nylo flow on my long EZ and it's still ok, I have alu vari tube in the trailing edge of my LG and it will make replacement a snap.


Re: Fillet rule of thumb?

Larry Severson
 

At 06:24 AM 2/20/2008, you wrote:

It occurred to me that all this discussion has been entertaining for all of us non-engineers and that for (maybe) the vast majority of "us" a fillet is an esthetic thing, but you serous guys are serious. Hope it helps you squeeze an additional tenth of a knot out of her, Sammy.
It will do a lot more than that. Any fuselage/wing join greater than 60 degrees creates HIGH drag.


Larry Severson
Fountain Valley, CA 92708
(714) 968-9852
larry2@...


Re: Fillet rule of thumb?

Larry Severson
 

At 01:47 AM 2/20/2008, you wrote:

Sam,

I do not know if you have used it before but the NACA report server
has a wealth of the real deal aero research carried out by "real
engineers" Some of them might even have been professionals ;-)
I got the suggestion from an engineer with 30 years experience at Northrup and extensive Rutan design build activity.


Larry Severson
Fountain Valley, CA 92708
(714) 968-9852
larry2@...


Re: Fillet rule of thumb?

Doug Humble <hawkidoug@...>
 

I believe the beer can is used prior to figuring out the dimensions. The more cans you use, the better it looks.

Doug "Hawkeye" Humble
A Sign Above www.asignabove.net
Omaha NE
N25974

----- Original Message -----
From: johntenhave
To: Q-LIST@...
Sent: Wednesday, February 20, 2008 3:47 AM
Subject: [Q-LIST] Re: Fillet rule of thumb?


Sam,

I do not know if you have used it before but the NACA report server
has a wealth of the real deal aero research carried out by "real
engineers" Some of them might even have been professionals ;-)

Do a search on interference drag (report 518 for an example) It is a
treasure trove. I have searched carefully but can find no reference
to beer cans as an aerodynamic unit of measurement, although it may be
a derived figure. Some of the earlier pre-computer papers have
excellent explanations which will help.

Some of the list members with access to an engineering library may be
able to hunt up the bible. If you get stuck I can get it on interloan
and see what is there.

Report back

regards

John

--- In Q-LIST@..., "Sam Hoskins" <sam.hoskins@...> wrote:
>
> Hi gang,
>
> Once again, I'm up to no good. Would anyone happen to know the rule
> of thumb regarding the radius required for wing root fillets? I seem
> to recall that the radius is a percentage of the chord. Can't
> remember the numbers, though.
>
> Does anyone know?
>
>
> Jealous of Paul F. (He's flying).
>
> Sam Hoskins
> Murphysboro, IL
>


Re: Fillet rule of thumb?

Mark A. Pearson <wlkabout@...>
 

It occurred to me that all this discussion has been entertaining for all of us non-engineers and that for (maybe) the vast majority of "us" a fillet is an esthetic thing, but you serous guys are serious. Hope it helps you squeeze an additional tenth of a knot out of her, Sammy.

----- Original Message -----
From: Sam Hoskins
To: Q-LIST@...
Sent: Wednesday, February 20, 2008 6:58 AM
Subject: Re: [Q-LIST] Re: Fillet rule of thumb?


That is what I was looking for, Charlie. Thanks!

I also received some photos of various aircraft, from some of the
guys. My challenge is introducing a fillet, where there is so little
space betwixt the inboard edge of the elevator and the fuselage. i
have already built up the area with two-part foam, now I just need to
carve and glass it.

I think I may use the vertical versions seen on so many of today's
jets. I have seen some Lancair Legacy's with that set-up. It will be
simple, doable, and a lot better than what I used to have.

Thanks all!

Sam Hoskins
Murphysboro, IL

On Feb 20, 2008 6:51 AM, <oneskydog@...> wrote:
>
>
>
>
>
>
> Sam and John,
>
> I looked in Horton at the interference drag graph for wing to fuselage 6 to
> 8% of chord at the root.
>
> Regards,
>
> Charlie
>
>
> In a message dated 2/20/2008 2:47:50 A.M. Mountain Standard Time,
>
> johntenhave@... writes:
>
> Sam,
>
> I do not know if you have used it before but the NACA report server
> has a wealth of the real deal aero research carried out by "real
> engineers" Some of them might even have been professionals ;-)
>
> Do a search on interference drag (report 518 for an example) It is a
> treasure trove. I have searched carefully but can find no reference
> to beer cans as an aerodynamic unit of measurement, although it may be
> a derived figure. Some of the earlier pre-computer papers have
> excellent explanations which will help.
>
> Some of the list members with access to an engineering library may be
> able to hunt up the bible. If you get stuck I can get it on interloan
> and see what is there.
>
> Report back
>
> regards
>
> John
>
> --- In _Q-LIST@... (mailto:Q-LIST@...) , "Sam
>
> Hoskins" <sam.hoskins@sam> wrote:
> >
> > Hi gang,
> >
> > Once again, I'm up to no good. Would anyone happen to know the rule
> > of thumb regarding the radius required for wing root fillets? I seem
> > to recall that the radius is a percentage of the chord. Can't
> > remember the numbers, though.
> >
> > Does anyone know?
> >
> >
> > Jealous of Paul F. (He's flying).
> >
> > Sam Hoskins
> > Murphysboro, IL
> >
>
> **************Ideas to please picky eaters. Watch video on AOL Living.
>
> (http://living.aol.com/video/how-to-please-your-picky-eater/rachel-campos-duffy/
> 2050827?NCID=aolcmp00300000002598)
>
>
>
>


Re: Fillet rule of thumb?

Sam Hoskins
 

That is what I was looking for, Charlie. Thanks!

I also received some photos of various aircraft, from some of the
guys. My challenge is introducing a fillet, where there is so little
space betwixt the inboard edge of the elevator and the fuselage. i
have already built up the area with two-part foam, now I just need to
carve and glass it.

I think I may use the vertical versions seen on so many of today's
jets. I have seen some Lancair Legacy's with that set-up. It will be
simple, doable, and a lot better than what I used to have.

Thanks all!

Sam Hoskins
Murphysboro, IL

On Feb 20, 2008 6:51 AM, <oneskydog@...> wrote:






Sam and John,

I looked in Horton at the interference drag graph for wing to fuselage 6 to
8% of chord at the root.

Regards,

Charlie


In a message dated 2/20/2008 2:47:50 A.M. Mountain Standard Time,

johntenhave@... writes:

Sam,

I do not know if you have used it before but the NACA report server
has a wealth of the real deal aero research carried out by "real
engineers" Some of them might even have been professionals ;-)

Do a search on interference drag (report 518 for an example) It is a
treasure trove. I have searched carefully but can find no reference
to beer cans as an aerodynamic unit of measurement, although it may be
a derived figure. Some of the earlier pre-computer papers have
excellent explanations which will help.

Some of the list members with access to an engineering library may be
able to hunt up the bible. If you get stuck I can get it on interloan
and see what is there.

Report back

regards

John

--- In _Q-LIST@... (mailto:Q-LIST@...) , "Sam

Hoskins" <sam.hoskins@sam> wrote:
>
> Hi gang,
>
> Once again, I'm up to no good. Would anyone happen to know the rule
> of thumb regarding the radius required for wing root fillets? I seem
> to recall that the radius is a percentage of the chord. Can't
> remember the numbers, though.
>
> Does anyone know?
>
>
> Jealous of Paul F. (He's flying).
>
> Sam Hoskins
> Murphysboro, IL
>

**************Ideas to please picky eaters. Watch video on AOL Living.

(http://living.aol.com/video/how-to-please-your-picky-eater/rachel-campos-duffy/
2050827?NCID=aolcmp00300000002598)




Re: Fillet rule of thumb?

MartinErni@...
 

Doug,
I just love the way your mind works.
E

In a message dated 2/20/2008 9:49:01 A.M. Eastern Standard Time,
hawkidoug@... writes:




I believe the beer can is used prior to figuring out the dimensions. The
more cans you use, the better it looks.

Doug "Hawkeye" Humble
A Sign Above www.asignabove.A S
Omaha NE
N25974
----- Original Message -----
From: johntenhave
To: _Q-LIST@... (mailto:Q-LIST@...)
Sent: Wednesday, February 20, 2008 3:47 AM
Subject: [Q-LIST] Re: Fillet rule of thumb?

Sam,

I do not know if you have used it before but the NACA report server
has a wealth of the real deal aero research carried out by "real
engineers" Some of them might even have been professionals ;-)

Do a search on interference drag (report 518 for an example) It is a
treasure trove. I have searched carefully but can find no reference
to beer cans as an aerodynamic unit of measurement, although it may be
a derived figure. Some of the earlier pre-computer papers have
excellent explanations which will help.

Some of the list members with access to an engineering library may be
able to hunt up the bible. If you get stuck I can get it on interloan
and see what is there.

Report back

regards

John

--- In _Q-LIST@... (mailto:Q-LIST@...) , "Sam
Hoskins" <sam.hoskins@sam> wrote:

Hi gang,

Once again, I'm up to no good. Would anyone happen to know the rule
of thumb regarding the radius required for wing root fillets? I seem
to recall that the radius is a percentage of the chord. Can't
remember the numbers, though.

Does anyone know?


Jealous of Paul F. (He's flying).

Sam Hoskins
Murphysboro, IL
[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]







**************Ideas to please picky eaters. Watch video on AOL Living.
(http://living.aol.com/video/how-to-please-your-picky-eater/rachel-campos-duffy/
2050827?NCID=aolcmp00300000002598)


Re: Fillet rule of thumb?

JMasal@...
 

In a message dated 2/20/2008 8:28:01 A.M. Central Standard Time,
wlkabout@... writes:

but you serous guys are serious. Hope it helps you squeeze an additional
tenth of a knot out of her, Sammy.




A Prof of mine once said: We are becoming so smart these days that we are
knowing more and more about less and less so that soon we will know all there is
to know about nothing.
Many of us know that FIRST you get the plane out of the garage and into the
air. Then you can fiddle-fart around with the miniscule details. If you don't,
there is a high probability you will never finish your project... and some
other guy may. A number of you guys have acquired earlier started projects to
prove that.
Now as for Sam, he has a thousand flying hours on his and now is a fine time
to look for that tenth of a knot here and there.
When you get in the air... and IF you get in the air, you will be tickled
plum to death if you are flying along at even 140kts. So FIRST get out in the
shop and DO something... regularly! (and enjoy the arcane discussions late in
the evening when you are outta the shop and dont let them divert your
attentino).

And finally: Better is the enemy of Good.

j.



**************Ideas to please picky eaters. Watch video on AOL Living.
(http://living.aol.com/video/how-to-please-your-picky-eater/rachel-campos-duffy/
2050827?NCID=aolcmp00300000002598)


Re: Fillet rule of thumb?

John ten
 

Sam,

I do not know if you have used it before but the NACA report server
has a wealth of the real deal aero research carried out by "real
engineers" Some of them might even have been professionals ;-)

Do a search on interference drag (report 518 for an example) It is a
treasure trove. I have searched carefully but can find no reference
to beer cans as an aerodynamic unit of measurement, although it may be
a derived figure. Some of the earlier pre-computer papers have
excellent explanations which will help.

Some of the list members with access to an engineering library may be
able to hunt up the bible. If you get stuck I can get it on interloan
and see what is there.

Report back

regards

John

--- In Q-LIST@..., "Sam Hoskins" <sam.hoskins@...> wrote:

Hi gang,

Once again, I'm up to no good. Would anyone happen to know the rule
of thumb regarding the radius required for wing root fillets? I seem
to recall that the radius is a percentage of the chord. Can't
remember the numbers, though.

Does anyone know?


Jealous of Paul F. (He's flying).

Sam Hoskins
Murphysboro, IL


Re: Fillet rule of thumb?

One Sky Dog
 

Sam and John,

I looked in Horton at the interference drag graph for wing to fuselage 6 to
8% of chord at the root.

Regards,

Charlie

In a message dated 2/20/2008 2:47:50 A.M. Mountain Standard Time,
johntenhave@... writes:




Sam,

I do not know if you have used it before but the NACA report server
has a wealth of the real deal aero research carried out by "real
engineers" Some of them might even have been professionals ;-)

Do a search on interference drag (report 518 for an example) It is a
treasure trove. I have searched carefully but can find no reference
to beer cans as an aerodynamic unit of measurement, although it may be
a derived figure. Some of the earlier pre-computer papers have
excellent explanations which will help.

Some of the list members with access to an engineering library may be
able to hunt up the bible. If you get stuck I can get it on interloan
and see what is there.

Report back

regards

John

--- In _Q-LIST@... (mailto:Q-LIST@...) , "Sam
Hoskins" <sam.hoskins@sam> wrote:

Hi gang,

Once again, I'm up to no good. Would anyone happen to know the rule
of thumb regarding the radius required for wing root fillets? I seem
to recall that the radius is a percentage of the chord. Can't
remember the numbers, though.

Does anyone know?


Jealous of Paul F. (He's flying).

Sam Hoskins
Murphysboro, IL






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Re: Q1 Hydraulic Brakes - advice please

Kerri & Mark <ksm@...>
 

Hi Paul

how is Vicky her photo is still on the workshop wall,
send your email and I can send pictures.
I also thought about hydraulic systems but the system was cable and has worked for this long why add fluid in an old pipe and risk over stressing it. as yet no testing has been done I am planing on making half a pant and belt driving the wheel for test and service life tests
Mark Fitzgerald Q1 NZ


Re: Intake Elbow

Bruce Crain
 

Thanks Deems,
So I could just order elbows for say a C90 and the amount of air flow and the bolt holes would be the exact same as the 0200? Without the little extra knuckles for an injection system.
Bruce Crain

Please note: message attached


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Re: Intake Elbow

Deems Herring
 

They are the same for all the engines. continental just started making them with the injector bosses when they started making the O-200.

Deems

----- Original Message ----
From: "jcrain2@..." <jcrain2@...>
To: Q-LIST@...
Sent: Monday, February 18, 2008 10:44:05 PM
Subject: Re: [Q-LIST] Intake Elbow


Thanks
Deems,
Will
the
65
75
85
or
90
fit
the
0200
correctly?
Bruce

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Re: Fillet rule of thumb?

denpau@...
 

Sam,

I work on commercial aviation aircraft, more years than I care to mention.
All of the most recent designs (Jets) that I have come across have as close
to 90 degree junctions between the upper wing surface and the fuselage as
practical. Fillets forward and aft of the wing and blending on the under side
are about the limit of streamlining. Maybe the wind tunnels show something us
amatures cannot visualize?

Dennis


---------------------- Original Message: ---------------------
From: "Sam Hoskins" <sam.hoskins@...>
To: "Quickie List" <Q-LIST@...>
Subject: [Q-LIST] Fillet rule of thumb?
Date: Tue, 19 Feb 2008 01:54:33 +0000

Hi gang,

Once again, I'm up to no good. Would anyone happen to know the rule
of thumb regarding the radius required for wing root fillets? I seem
to recall that the radius is a percentage of the chord. Can't
remember the numbers, though.

Does anyone know?


Jealous of Paul F. (He's flying).

Sam Hoskins
Murphysboro, IL


Re: Q1 Hydraulic Brakes - a load of pants?

denpau@...
 

Dr. Paul,

Some years back at Sun&Fun, Starlite (sp) Wheels had a display. The spun
aluminum wheels (two halves welded together) with integral hydraulic disk
brakes, fitting within the wheel profile (no bulge on side of wheel pants)
impressed me. Tubeless tires could be used, saving some weight. Not too long
ago I located their web page, still could not afford the price.

Dennis


---------------------- Original Message: ---------------------
From: "Dr Paul M Wright" <paul@...>
To: Q-LIST@...
Subject: [Q-LIST] Q1 Hydraulic Brakes - a load of pants?
Date: Mon, 18 Feb 2008 10:35:45 +0000

Thanks for such a comprehensive response everyone!
I used Nylaflow in my Q2 ... 800 hours without problems .... for
hydraulics. As the tube is glassed into the canard of my Q1 (with,
thankfully, enough room to get a compression fitting on each end)
this appears the obvious route to take.

The cockpit end is easy to sort out.

I'm still scratching my head about the actual discs and fittings. I
have the option of stepping down in wheel size and fitting the pad
assembly inside the pants, probably with the 'blister', or building
bigger pants.

I just wondered if someone else had already done this to save me
reinventing my wheels (sic) :-)

Imagine a Quickie that will go AND stop. Wow!

Finally, 500 hours is the total on my Q1, 390 on the Rotax (after
Onan, need thermals, Global which busted a crankcase lug - remember
that Jim?, and a Mosler). I broke down the Rotax last week, and the
bores and bearings are all just fine. I'm gonna fly it for another
200 hours and do it again. Not a long job. After that I may go for a
CDI (2 plugs are better than one, especially over water).

Cheers,

Paul

--- In Q-LIST@..., jerry kennedy <jerrykennedy2001@...>
wrote:


--- Peter Harris <peterjfharris@...> wrote:

No problems, original equipment 20 years.

Peter



_____

From: Q-LIST@...
[mailto:Q-LIST@...] On Behalf Of
Mike Dwyer
Sent: Sunday, 17 February 2008 10:47 AM
To: Q-LIST@...
Subject: Re: [Q-LIST] Re: Q1 Hydraulic Brakes -
advice please



No problems,
Airheart single lever.
Mike Q200 N3QP 1000+ hours

Richard Hole wrote:
Let's take a poll of long-term Q2 flyers. Has the
Nylaflow brake
tubing caused difficulties due to ruptured lines,
tubing blown off
fittings, abraded through, etc. I am fairly new to
Q2, but have seen
this same tubing used extensively in other
experimental designs
successfully in service for 20+ years. Perhaps the
old adage: "If it
ain't broke, don't fix it" may have some use here.
One caveat: I would
not use Nylaflow for a brake system which keeps
the lines pressurized
as a parking brake. The high pressure maintained
over long periods of
time just can't be all that good an idea...



Quickie Builders Association WEB site
http://www.quickieb
<http://www.quickiebuilders.org> uilders.org


Yahoo! Groups Links


23 years with on problems. Hand brake as well as
toe brakes.

Jerry Kennedy
Q2- 214FK





[Non-text portions of this message have been
removed]



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Re: Fillet rule of thumb?

John ten
 

Sam,

Charlie disturbed the cobwebs sufficiently to recall that the bible on
the subject is Hoerner S., Fluid-Dynamic Drag. Highly recommended. It
was the design reference used by Mike Arnold for the AR5 as an example..

The Horton brothers wing to fuselage fillets are sometimes quite hard
to find - but not nearly as hard to find as the tail group fillets...;-)

regards

John




--- In Q-LIST@..., oneskydog@... wrote:

Sam,

Going from memory I think Horton recommends 10% of chord, at least
that is
what I am doing on my Dragonfly canard (oops it was supposed to be a
secret, I
got Marstall in my sights).

Regards,

Charlie


In a message dated 2/18/2008 6:55:06 P.M. Mountain Standard Time,
sam.hoskins@... writes:




Hi gang,

Once again, I'm up to no good. Would anyone happen to know the rule
of thumb regarding the radius required for wing root fillets? I seem
to recall that the radius is a percentage of the chord. Can't
remember the numbers, though.

Does anyone know?

Jealous of Paul F. (He's flying).

Sam Hoskins
Murphysboro, IL








**************Ideas to please picky eaters. Watch video on AOL
Living.
(http://living.aol.com/video/how-to-please-your-picky-eater/rachel-campos-duffy/
2050827?NCID=aolcmp00300000002598)


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]