Date   

Re: Increased fuel capacity

ryan goodman
 

Hmm... Now I'm wondering which size tank I have on mine. I'll have to look tomorrow.


On Tue, Oct 20, 2020 at 5:53 PM, Michael
<dunningme@...> wrote:
Ryan,

Sam has a schematic of his aux. fuel system in his photos folder, in case that's helpful. I'm sure he can explain more:

https://q-list.groups.io/g/main/photo/115659/4?p=Name,,,100,1,0,0
--
-MD
#2827 (still thinking about planning on visualizing how to finish building)


Re: Increased fuel capacity

Michael Dunning
 

Ryan,

Sam has a schematic of his aux. fuel system in his photos folder, in case that's helpful. I'm sure he can explain more:

https://q-list.groups.io/g/main/photo/115659/4?p=Name,,,100,1,0,0
--
-MD
#2827 (still thinking about planning on visualizing how to finish building)


Re: Guidance on Removing the Tail

Corbin
 

Ahh...yep, Jerry's design on the tail cradle.  I just saw the 2.0 you linked and am going to replicate that tomorrow.  I hope I do Jerry justice!

Anyone know the torque of the tail bolts off the top of their head, for when I put it back together? 
--

Corbin 
N33QR


Re: Guidance on Removing the Tail

Sam Hoskins
 

Just to set the record straight, it's Jerry Marstall's rig. He made mine, but now he has his 2.0 version. You can see it on his Q-tour video. https://youtu.be/nAlcd_KCjko

I really like it, and it even folds up when I don't need it.

Sam

On Tue, Oct 20, 2020, 3:02 PM Corbin via groups.io <c_geiser=icloud.com@groups.io> wrote:
Michael,

Thanks for that link to the plans....I was trying to search for that earlier today.  I have been thinking about Sam's setup every since I started following his blog....I like that tail support.  For the  front end, I would probably just attach my engine stand and hold it in place that way.
--

Corbin 
N33QR


Re: Build times

Kevin Sheeley
 

Q200, dragger, 442 hours, O200A, 721# EW

29 Years to build starting in 1986. Too many hours of building to count (rebuilding, trying to redesign only to come back to plans, stopped counting dollars). In other words life got in the way during the build and I am now enjoying flying again.

On Monday, October 19, 2020, 02:34:36 PM EDT, Airheart <airheart@...> wrote:


test

 

From: main@Q-List.groups.io [mailto:main@Q-List.groups.io] On Behalf Of Jay Scheevel
Sent: Monday, October 19, 2020 2:16 PM
To: main@Q-List.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Q-List] Build times

 

Just your time

 

Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID



Michael <dunningme@...> wrote:

Do we include the previous builder's time (if known) in the partially built total or just personal years since buying it?
--
-MD
#2827 (still thinking about planning on visualizing how to finish building)


Re: Guidance on Removing the Tail

Michael Dunning
 

Glad to help, Corbin. Plus you helped me out; reminded me I've got 10 new AN525-10R10 bolts to order!
--
-MD
#2827 (still thinking about planning on visualizing how to finish building)


Re: Biaxial-traxial vs 7715 Fiberglass #epoxy

Mike Bergen
 

Cody, I had a similar career path as Charlie, but instead of things that fly it was things that float (think navy).

I am with the consensus to stick with the plans. There are benefits with the uni-directional fabric that are not quite obvious to the novice over a woven or knitted product.

There has never been a structural failure of the wings of these aircraft in flight. However, in the tail dragger version of the plane you will eventually see a wrinkling of the top skin due to the main gear being out board.

I would recommend however that you get with Sam and ask him to share with you the improved layout for the spar caps that help reduce or eliminate this issue. He has done this on the canard and main wings.

I can also guide you through how to make your carbon fiber panel to achieve the finish that you are looking for and have it pinhole free. You will get pinholes even with vacuum consolidation if you don't take a few initial steps.

Mike


Re: Guidance on Removing the Tail

John Hoxie
 

You may (depending on slack) also need to disconnect the static
port tubing and nav-com antenna wire.


On Tue, Oct 20, 2020 at 12:15 PM, Michael
<dunningme@...> wrote:
Corbin,

You should have fuselage screws and cable disconnects as shown here:
Q2 Plans Chapter 15 Page 15-02

Besides the tail cradle, the only thing might be to support the engine since the bird will be significantly nose heavy. Sam has a pretty handy solution...
http://samhoskins.blogspot.com/2014/08/making-progress-aint-always-easy.html
--
-MD
#2827 (still thinking about planning on visualizing how to finish building)


Re: Increased fuel capacity

Jay Scheevel
 

A common theme around here….The panels get younger and the pilots get older 😊

 

Cheers,

Jay

 

From: main@Q-List.groups.io <main@Q-List.groups.io> On Behalf Of Sam Hoskins
Sent: Tuesday, October 20, 2020 2:01 PM
To: main@q-list.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Q-List] Increased fuel capacity

 

My fuel tank is a pre-fab and I kept as much as possible to keep as much fuel as possible.  That results in the valley to accommodate the elevator push tubes, as can be seen in this very old photo. As I mentioned, it holds 16.5 gallons.

Panel_11-01-2007.JPG

 

 

On Tue, Oct 20, 2020 at 1:05 PM Michael <dunningme@...> wrote:

Awesome to finally see one of the prefab tanks!! I've only ever gathered the little bit of information in QAC Newsletter #15:

NUMBER: Q2BT35
DATE: 26 January, 1982

Q2 and Quickie prefabricated fuel tank; This fuel tank is manufactured with the forward face about 3.5” higher than what is shown in the basic plans. This fact will allow more fuel capacity, if desired. Be sure to check first pilot and passenger legroom, particularly if you are tall. It may also be necessary to build a tunnel for the pitch control arm. The builder can, of course, use the plan provided template to reduce the fuel tank height to the standard figure.


I imagine the warnings above would still apply today?
--
-MD
#2827 (still thinking about planning on visualizing how to finish building)


Re: Guidance on Removing the Tail

Corbin
 

Much appreciated, Mike.  I am going to read through that info a couple of times and keep it handy at the hangar.  Thanks for sending!!
--

Corbin 
N33QR


Re: Guidance on Removing the Tail

Corbin
 

Michael,

Thanks for that link to the plans....I was trying to search for that earlier today.  I have been thinking about Sam's setup every since I started following his blog....I like that tail support.  For the  front end, I would probably just attach my engine stand and hold it in place that way.
--

Corbin 
N33QR


Re: Increased fuel capacity

Sam Hoskins
 

My fuel tank is a pre-fab and I kept as much as possible to keep as much fuel as possible.  That results in the valley to accommodate the elevator push tubes, as can be seen in this very old photo. As I mentioned, it holds 16.5 gallons.
Panel_11-01-2007.JPG


On Tue, Oct 20, 2020 at 1:05 PM Michael <dunningme@...> wrote:
Awesome to finally see one of the prefab tanks!! I've only ever gathered the little bit of information in QAC Newsletter #15:

NUMBER: Q2BT35
DATE: 26 January, 1982

Q2 and Quickie prefabricated fuel tank; This fuel tank is manufactured with the forward face about 3.5” higher than what is shown in the basic plans. This fact will allow more fuel capacity, if desired. Be sure to check first pilot and passenger legroom, particularly if you are tall. It may also be necessary to build a tunnel for the pitch control arm. The builder can, of course, use the plan provided template to reduce the fuel tank height to the standard figure.


I imagine the warnings above would still apply today?
--
-MD
#2827 (still thinking about planning on visualizing how to finish building)


Re: Biaxial-traxial vs 7715 Fiberglass #epoxy

Jim Patillo
 

Thanks for the reply Cody. Sounds like you've got the Q bug! Good luck on your build. It's always nice to see someone new on this list furthering the cause. If you stick with it and get it flying, you won't ever regret it. The Q200 makes for a great little commuter and I use it weekly for that purpose. There is a reason this design is still popular, even though we had no support when we started. It's a fun and fast airplane!   

If I can be of any help, please email me off line. I'll give you my phone number so we can chat.

Welcome aboard.


From: main@Q-List.groups.io <main@Q-List.groups.io> on behalf of Cody <cody.craig1985@...>
Sent: Tuesday, October 20, 2020 9:29 AM
To: main@Q-List.groups.io <main@Q-List.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [Q-List] Biaxial-traxial vs 7715 Fiberglass #epoxy
 
Also, I had dreamed of owning a plane. As a kid I dreamed of a single seat airplane to just go anywhere anytime. But I grew up and learned planes are expensive. I had all but given up on that dream. This kit (less engine, and avionics) was given to me as a gift. I had never heard of a quickie till then. Now I'm smitten and I love them already. I intend to try to build this thing as someone fated to have it. Since this was a chance happening. But it wasnt planned for or intended originally. But I also intend on using it to commute to field repairs for my job. Or to do travelling 91.411/413 checks economically. Hence the focus on a potentially lighter airframe with maximum strength and safety. I also dont want to be stuck building this thing for 10 years. With potential manpower and help from some friends and a shop set to support private jets I hope to get a rolling chassis inside of a year.

Virus-free. www.avast.com


Re: Increased fuel capacity

Brian Larick
 

I have a nice collection of kit to build.  Very excited.  What I don’t currently have is time.  So I should have your signature as well.

Brian

On Oct 20, 2020, at 14:05, Michael <dunningme@...> wrote:

Awesome to finally see one of the prefab tanks!! I've only ever gathered the little bit of information in QAC Newsletter #15:

NUMBER: Q2BT35
DATE: 26 January, 1982

Q2 and Quickie prefabricated fuel tank; This fuel tank is manufactured with the forward face about 3.5” higher than what is shown in the basic plans. This fact will allow more fuel capacity, if desired. Be sure to check first pilot and passenger legroom, particularly if you are tall. It may also be necessary to build a tunnel for the pitch control arm. The builder can, of course, use the plan provided template to reduce the fuel tank height to the standard figure.


I imagine the warnings above would still apply today?
--
-MD
#2827 (still thinking about planning on visualizing how to finish building)


Re: Guidance on Removing the Tail

Mike Dwyer
 

With the tail dragger you don't need a fixture.
I have a piece of foam that I unroll under the rear shell.
Chalk the main wheels.  Important not to miss this step!
Use a hydraulic jack with a 6"x12" or so piece of plywood with an inch of foam (Let's call these Pads) on it to jack up the front behind the cowling.  Jack until the fuselage starts moving (not a lot).
Use another jack with a Pad to jack up the fuselage just in front of the split line.  Jack this until the tail wheel just lifts off.
Pull the rudder cables from the tail wheel.  Your design could differ here.
Pull all the screws around the shell.  Note: the jacks are supporting the fuselage.
Slide the rear shell back holding the inner aileron fairings and set it on the foam pad.
If your just inspecting, this should be good enough.  I have battery cable, antenna wires, ...  and each rudder cable has a disconnect there also.
Takes one person about 30 min when you have built the pads.

Mike Dwyer

Q200 Website: http://goo.gl/V8IrJF


On Tue, Oct 20, 2020 at 11:25 AM Corbin via groups.io <c_geiser=icloud.com@groups.io> wrote:
As my avionics guy is getting closer to finishing the wiring for my Lightspeed ignition, I need to remove the tail for better access to the battery.  The IA that did this during my conditional has passed away recently so I am unable to have him show me.

Aside from building a frame to support the two halves, what all do I need to disconnect to remove the tail?  Is it just the rudder cables that need disconnecting and would I remove them from the tailwheel or further up the fuselage/pedals?

Any guidance is appreciated.

--

Corbin 
N33QR


Re: Guidance on Removing the Tail

Michael Dunning
 

Corbin,

You should have fuselage screws and cable disconnects as shown here:
Q2 Plans Chapter 15 Page 15-02

Besides the tail cradle, the only thing might be to support the engine since the bird will be significantly nose heavy. Sam has a pretty handy solution...
http://samhoskins.blogspot.com/2014/08/making-progress-aint-always-easy.html
--
-MD
#2827 (still thinking about planning on visualizing how to finish building)


Re: Increased fuel capacity

Michael Dunning
 

Awesome to finally see one of the prefab tanks!! I've only ever gathered the little bit of information in QAC Newsletter #15:

NUMBER: Q2BT35
DATE: 26 January, 1982

Q2 and Quickie prefabricated fuel tank; This fuel tank is manufactured with the forward face about 3.5” higher than what is shown in the basic plans. This fact will allow more fuel capacity, if desired. Be sure to check first pilot and passenger legroom, particularly if you are tall. It may also be necessary to build a tunnel for the pitch control arm. The builder can, of course, use the plan provided template to reduce the fuel tank height to the standard figure.


I imagine the warnings above would still apply today?
--
-MD
#2827 (still thinking about planning on visualizing how to finish building)


Re: Biaxial-traxial vs 7715 Fiberglass #epoxy

 

Also, I had dreamed of owning a plane. As a kid I dreamed of a single seat airplane to just go anywhere anytime. But I grew up and learned planes are expensive. I had all but given up on that dream. This kit (less engine, and avionics) was given to me as a gift. I had never heard of a quickie till then. Now I'm smitten and I love them already. I intend to try to build this thing as someone fated to have it. Since this was a chance happening. But it wasnt planned for or intended originally. But I also intend on using it to commute to field repairs for my job. Or to do travelling 91.411/413 checks economically. Hence the focus on a potentially lighter airframe with maximum strength and safety. I also dont want to be stuck building this thing for 10 years. With potential manpower and help from some friends and a shop set to support private jets I hope to get a rolling chassis inside of a year.


Guidance on Removing the Tail

Corbin
 

As my avionics guy is getting closer to finishing the wiring for my Lightspeed ignition, I need to remove the tail for better access to the battery.  The IA that did this during my conditional has passed away recently so I am unable to have him show me.

Aside from building a frame to support the two halves, what all do I need to disconnect to remove the tail?  Is it just the rudder cables that need disconnecting and would I remove them from the tailwheel or further up the fuselage/pedals?

Any guidance is appreciated.

--

Corbin 
N33QR


Re: Increased fuel capacity

John Hoxie
 

Ryan,
mine isn't flying yet, still a project. My header tank was designed by a late Boeing engineer, Q1 and Q2 dealer-builder. The top of which doesn't extend forward toward the firewall. He did this for ease of build and maintenance. The sides of the header are not vertical, but teardrop shaped, for less unusable fuel. I don't know the capacity.
     I built my main tank with a taller forward wall like some others, necessitating removal of the sandwich for a small area for elevator torque tube clearance. I estimate from other's similar design at 16-1/2 to 17 gallons. I made my consoles wet, following layup build like the other tanks. I installed a one inch PVC tube in each console (wiring and tubing for side consoles and aileron torque tube for the center console), floxed to the console top and extending a half inch beyond the seatback bulkhead and the side console forward ends, floxed on each side of the bulkheads. For the center console, a dry bay was made, with the torque tube phenolic being the barrier at the top and a foam sandwich panel angling forward to the fuel tank top. A piece of larger tube section was fabricated to join the aft side of the phenolic to increase the dimensional area for the joystick to torque tube bolt. I floxed versatube pieces in the bottom areas for fuel flow to the main tank and in the top forward ends for vents. I believe I also installed some intake screens, I'd have to check my pictures. I had to make a tunnel at the bottom of the center console for the seat belt attach points. Measuring water before installing the tops, each side holds one gallon and the center two gallons. I figured its on the fuel tank and using the same materials and techniques and at CG, will give me another hour at 4 gph cruise. Also, in climbout, the fuel in the consoles will move aft, the seatback area full for slightly aft CG for better climb performance. The main with header should give me about 25 usable gallons.
    Was planning on making a fed dummy (person shaped) ferry tank of 25 usable gallons, that the lap/ shoulder belts on the passenger side would hold down. It would look like a torso with lap, which would extend forward to the front of the main tank. Again, this location normally holds a person, so a good location for the CG. 
    All together, this would give me about 50 usable gallons - ten hours at 5 gph if I find I ever need this kind of range. 

 
John Hoxie
He is no fool, who gives up what he can not keep, to gain what he can not loose -- Jim Elliot


On Monday, October 19, 2020, 07:33:19 PM MDT, ryan goodman via groups.io <elboy0712@...> wrote:


I'm curious if anyone has made modifications to their Q2s to increase fuel capacity. If so how did you go about it? How did it effect your CG?
     Thanks, Ryan

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