Date   

Re: Typical RPM on Static Ground Test?

Jim Patillo
 

Corbin,

Glad to hear you found the problem. I check filters yearly for that very reason. Do you live around Bentonville, AR? I get back there a couple times a year.

I went to school in Fayetteville.

Regards,
Fly safe!

Jim
N46JP - Q200


Re: Typical RPM on Static Ground Test?

Corbin Geiser <c_geiser@...>
 

No worries at all. I forgot about it until yesterday afternoon. 🙂

Corbin


Re: Typical RPM on Static Ground Test?

Sam Hoskins
 

The Inlet Filter!

Shoot, that was on our list to check and we got distracted by the mis-firing spark plugs that we (I) forgot to check it.  Sorry about that!

Sam


Re: Typical RPM on Static Ground Test?

One Sky Dog
 

Jay,

My perspective comes from most of my airtime in unconventional aerial vehicles. I am also struggling with transition training from a reverse perspective.

I had over 500 hours of airtime and at least 600 dead stick landings and had flown 120 miles without an engine before I walked into a flight school. I walked out with 56 hours logged in a C-150. I had purchased a flying Dragonfly so I thought I should add a tail wheel endorsement and got 10 hrs in a C-140 with 85 hp.

I managed to get an hour of instruction in a Dragonfly with a CFI shooting touch and go’s before 15 hours of taxi time in my plane before first flight. Looking back that was marginal and I had a few landings that were completely wrong and took out a few props.
&
Now with over 1350 hrs of logged airtime. Today I am going for my 7 th lesson in my new airplane and hope to figure out the 3 point landings in it. It is a beast a highly STC’ed back country Super Pacer 180 hp with controllable propeller that likes to bounce unless set down just right.
I will be returning to my hangar at OGD to continue rebuilding my Dragonfly this summer. I am planning on going to the big Oshkosh event this year camping in Scholler area.

Regards,

Charlie 


On Apr 5, 2019, at 4:03 PM, 'Jay Scheevel SGT' jay@... [Q-LIST] <Q-LIST@...> wrote:

Interesting way to look at it Charlie. Does that mean that I am in a “conventional” taildragger, with a tundra tailwheel, the engine mounted on the tail, AND flying it backwards while looking out the rear window, YIKES!  That’s just what I needed.

 

Cheers,

Jay

 

From: Q-LIST@... <Q-LIST@...>
Sent: Friday, April 05, 2019 1:12 PM
To: Q-LIST@...
Subject: Re: [Q-LIST] Re: Typical RPM on Static Ground Test?

 

 

Jim,

Excellent point! I know a 17,000 hr pilot with lots of tailwheel experience , he almost wrecked a Dragonfly on a ferry flight for a customer.

Flying a tail dragged with the horizontal stab in back is quite different than a tail dragger with the horizontal stab in front.

Regards,

Charlie



> On Apr 5, 2019, at 11:12 AM, logistics_engineering@... [Q-LIST] <Q-LIST@...> wrote:
>
> Corbin,
>
> I would be careful of who you get to fly your plane south. Some nice Q’s have been destroyed by pilots claiming to be tailwheel wizards or instructor pilots that jump in only to find they have a bull by the horns..
> This is a hybrid. Not a tricycle or a tail dragged but a variant. You might be better off trailering it and get it there in one piece.
> One that comes to mind is Barry Weber’s beautiful Q bird that was relocated by someone other than the owner and smashed it on landing in Vegas.
>
> Another is the two jokers that picked up Jon’ Q in New Mexico to fly it directly to New Jersey. Everything worked fine until they tried the first landing in Albuquerque. After several attempts to land they crashed it.
>
> Jim
> N46JP - Q200
>
> ------------------------------------
> Posted by: logistics_engineering@...
> ------------------------------------
>
> Quickie Builders Association WEB site
> http://www.quickiebuilders.org
>
>
> ------------------------------------
>
> Yahoo Groups Links
>
>
>


Re: Typical RPM on Static Ground Test?

Michel Royer
 

Great ... Thx for sharing .  


Re: Typical RPM on Static Ground Test?

Corbin Geiser <c_geiser@...>
 

I am proud to share that we have now identified and fixed the problem! I removed the fuel inlet filter and placed it an ultrasonic cleaner for 50 minutes. It then produced 200 more RPM than it had been the last three weeks (ground static test). Also, it is no longer having any hesitations/surges at full throttle.

Test flight Saturday or Sunday...

Corbin


Re: Typical RPM on Static Ground Test?

Jim Patillo
 

Just sayin’

Jim
N46JP - Q200
2200+ takeoff/landings IN TYPE


Re: Typical RPM on Static Ground Test?

Jay Scheevel
 

Interesting way to look at it Charlie. Does that mean that I am in a “conventional” taildragger, with a tundra tailwheel, the engine mounted on the tail, AND flying it backwards while looking out the rear window, YIKES!  That’s just what I needed.

 

Cheers,

Jay

 

From: Q-LIST@...
Sent: Friday, April 05, 2019 1:12 PM
To: Q-LIST@...
Subject: Re: [Q-LIST] Re: Typical RPM on Static Ground Test?

 

 

Jim,

Excellent point! I know a 17,000 hr pilot with lots of tailwheel experience , he almost wrecked a Dragonfly on a ferry flight for a customer.

Flying a tail dragged with the horizontal stab in back is quite different than a tail dragger with the horizontal stab in front.

Regards,

Charlie



> On Apr 5, 2019, at 11:12 AM, logistics_engineering@... [Q-LIST] <Q-LIST@...> wrote:
>
> Corbin,
>
> I would be careful of who you get to fly your plane south. Some nice Q’s have been destroyed by pilots claiming to be tailwheel wizards or instructor pilots that jump in only to find they have a bull by the horns..
> This is a hybrid. Not a tricycle or a tail dragged but a variant. You might be better off trailering it and get it there in one piece.
> One that comes to mind is Barry Weber’s beautiful Q bird that was relocated by someone other than the owner and smashed it on landing in Vegas.
>
> Another is the two jokers that picked up Jon’ Q in New Mexico to fly it directly to New Jersey. Everything worked fine until they tried the first landing in Albuquerque. After several attempts to land they crashed it.
>
> Jim
> N46JP - Q200
>
> ------------------------------------
> Posted by: logistics_engineering@...
> ------------------------------------
>
> Quickie Builders Association WEB site
> http://www.quickiebuilders.org
>
>
> ------------------------------------
>
> Yahoo Groups Links
>
>
>


Re: Typical RPM on Static Ground Test?

Corbin Geiser <c_geiser@...>
 

Remember though, hours don’t mean everything.  Number of landings/takeoffs is a better indicator of experience for the example presented.  A five hour flight might only have one landing.  Extrapolate from there...

Corbin

On Apr 5, 2019, at 2:11 PM, Charlie oneskydog@... [Q-LIST] <Q-LIST@...> wrote:

 

Jim,

Excellent point! I know a 17,000 hr pilot with lots of tailwheel experience , he almost wrecked a Dragonfly on a ferry flight for a customer.

Flying a tail dragged with the horizontal stab in back is quite different than a tail dragger with the horizontal stab in front.

Regards,

Charlie



> On Apr 5, 2019, at 11:12 AM, logistics_engineering@... [Q-LIST] <Q-LIST@...> wrote:
>
> Corbin,
>
> I would be careful of who you get to fly your plane south. Some nice Q’s have been destroyed by pilots claiming to be tailwheel wizards or instructor pilots that jump in only to find they have a bull by the horns..
> This is a hybrid. Not a tricycle or a tail dragged but a variant. You might be better off trailering it and get it there in one piece.
> One that comes to mind is Barry Weber’s beautiful Q bird that was relocated by someone other than the owner and smashed it on landing in Vegas.
>
> Another is the two jokers that picked up Jon’ Q in New Mexico to fly it directly to New Jersey. Everything worked fine until they tried the first landing in Albuquerque. After several attempts to land they crashed it.
>
> Jim
> N46JP - Q200
>
> ------------------------------------
> Posted by: logistics_engineering@...
> ------------------------------------
>
> Quickie Builders Association WEB site
> http://www.quickiebuilders.org
>
>
> ------------------------------------
>
> Yahoo Groups Links
>
>
>


Re: Typical RPM on Static Ground Test?

Jay Scheevel
 

Funny you should ask, Jim. 😊 Attached  is the complete database (up to YE 2017) as an excel workbook. The tab labelled “All Q-types” has links to every NTSB report I could find highlighted in blue, so you just click on the link and  you can get it straight from the NTSB horse’s mouth.

 

Cheers,

Jay

 

From: Q-LIST@...
Sent: Friday, April 05, 2019 3:16 PM
To: Q-LIST@...
Subject: RE: [Q-LIST] Re: Typical RPM on Static Ground Test?

 

 

Jay, I knew that was coming, thanks. 😊

What about NTSB reports. Can you republish as well?

Jim
N46JP -Q200


Re: Typical RPM on Static Ground Test?

Jim Patillo
 

Jay, I knew that was coming, thanks. 😊

What about NTSB reports. Can you republish as well?

Jim
N46JP -Q200


Re: Typical RPM on Static Ground Test?

Jay Scheevel
 

Seems like a good time to repost the accident analysis and PIC time analysis of Q’s that I put together last year. Old news for some of you, but may be useful to some that are new to the group and to Q’s.

 

Cheers,

Jay Scheevel, Tri-Q2 N8WQ

 

From: Q-LIST@...
Sent: Friday, April 05, 2019 2:06 PM
To: Q-LIST@...
Subject: Re: [Q-LIST] Re: Typical RPM on Static Ground Test?

 

 

And the fellow who bought Phil Haxton's Q2 who killed himself taking off after the sale.

 

-------- Original message --------

From: "logistics_engineering@... [Q-LIST]"

Date: 4/5/19 2:12 PM (GMT-05:00)

To: Q-LIST@...

Subject: Re: [Q-LIST] Re: Typical RPM on Static Ground Test?

 

 

Corbin,

I would be careful of who you get to fly your plane south. Some nice Q’s have been destroyed by pilots claiming to be tailwheel wizards or instructor pilots that jump in only to find they have a bull by the horns.
This is a hybrid. Not a tricycle or a tail dragged but a variant. You might be better off trailering it and get it there in one piece.
One that comes to mind is Barry Weber’s beautiful Q bird that was relocated by someone other than the owner and smashed it on landing in Vegas.

Another is the two jokers that picked up Jon’ Q in New Mexico to fly it directly to New Jersey. Everything worked fine until they tried the first landing in Albuquerque. After several attempts to land they crashed it.

Jim
N46JP - Q200


Re: Typical RPM on Static Ground Test?

Jerry Marstall <jnmarstall@...>
 

And the fellow who bought Phil Haxton's Q2 who killed himself taking off after the sale.

-------- Original message --------
From: "logistics_engineering@... [Q-LIST]" <Q-LIST@...>
Date: 4/5/19 2:12 PM (GMT-05:00)
To: Q-LIST@...
Subject: Re: [Q-LIST] Re: Typical RPM on Static Ground Test?

 

Corbin,

I would be careful of who you get to fly your plane south. Some nice Q’s have been destroyed by pilots claiming to be tailwheel wizards or instructor pilots that jump in only to find they have a bull by the horns.
This is a hybrid. Not a tricycle or a tail dragged but a variant. You might be better off trailering it and get it there in one piece.
One that comes to mind is Barry Weber’s beautiful Q bird that was relocated by someone other than the owner and smashed it on landing in Vegas.

Another is the two jokers that picked up Jon’ Q in New Mexico to fly it directly to New Jersey. Everything worked fine until they tried the first landing in Albuquerque. After several attempts to land they crashed it.

Jim
N46JP - Q200


Re: Typical RPM on Static Ground Test?

Corbin Geiser <c_geiser@...>
 

I’m very picky on that. He’s a great tailwheel pilot and did very well today. Impressive actually. However, we still aren’t developing full power so back to the drawing board.

Corbin


Re: Typical RPM on Static Ground Test?

One Sky Dog
 

Jim,

Excellent point! I know a 17,000 hr pilot with lots of tailwheel experience , he almost wrecked a Dragonfly on a ferry flight for a customer.

Flying a tail dragged with the horizontal stab in back is quite different than a tail dragger with the horizontal stab in front.

Regards,

Charlie

On Apr 5, 2019, at 11:12 AM, logistics_engineering@... [Q-LIST] <Q-LIST@...> wrote:

Corbin,

I would be careful of who you get to fly your plane south. Some nice Q’s have been destroyed by pilots claiming to be tailwheel wizards or instructor pilots that jump in only to find they have a bull by the horns.
This is a hybrid. Not a tricycle or a tail dragged but a variant. You might be better off trailering it and get it there in one piece.
One that comes to mind is Barry Weber’s beautiful Q bird that was relocated by someone other than the owner and smashed it on landing in Vegas.

Another is the two jokers that picked up Jon’ Q in New Mexico to fly it directly to New Jersey. Everything worked fine until they tried the first landing in Albuquerque. After several attempts to land they crashed it.

Jim
N46JP - Q200

------------------------------------
Posted by: logistics_engineering@...
------------------------------------

Quickie Builders Association WEB site
http://www.quickiebuilders.org


------------------------------------

Yahoo Groups Links



Re: Typical RPM on Static Ground Test?

Jim Patillo
 

Corbin,

I would be careful of who you get to fly your plane south. Some nice Q’s have been destroyed by pilots claiming to be tailwheel wizards or instructor pilots that jump in only to find they have a bull by the horns.
This is a hybrid. Not a tricycle or a tail dragged but a variant. You might be better off trailering it and get it there in one piece.
One that comes to mind is Barry Weber’s beautiful Q bird that was relocated by someone other than the owner and smashed it on landing in Vegas.

Another is the two jokers that picked up Jon’ Q in New Mexico to fly it directly to New Jersey. Everything worked fine until they tried the first landing in Albuquerque. After several attempts to land they crashed it.

Jim
N46JP - Q200


Re: Typical RPM on Static Ground Test?

britmcman99
 

There is a joke in there somewhere. As a motorcycle rider I can attest to the fact that bugs I have invested have indeed improved lubrication. 

Phil 


On Apr 4, 2019, at 4:09 AM, Sam Hoskins sam.hoskins@... [Q-LIST] <Q-LIST@...> wrote:

 

This might be old news, but I thought I would correct it just for the record. This is an air flow performance fuel injection system, which utilizes a fuel injector mounted on the intake port of each cylinder. There is no carburetor and there is no carburetor heat. 

The system is set up so you can use filtered air or unfiltered air, your choice. There's a control in the cockpit that allows you to make the switch. So obviously, if you are on ground operations and you want to be having filtered air  you put pull that on. If you're looking for performance you use the unfiltered.

I really like the setup, and the Builder did a really nice job of installation. If I was to do mine over, I would probably use this airflow performance system rather than the automotive type injectors that I have.

For what it's worth, I do not have an air filter on my engine. I think that the bugs I ingest improve cylinder lubrication.

Sam

On Mon, Apr 1, 2019, 11:28 AM 'Jay Scheevel SGT' jay@... [Q-LIST] <Q-LIST@...> wrote:
 

Saw one more thing in your video that could result in your manifold pressure, mixture and performance changes. Your air intake manifold appears to be set up to take carb heat through a cone filter inside the lower cowl area, and/or ram air directly from the exterior scoop. There appears to be a linked pair of butterflies to open/close depending on the carb heat selector setting. If this linkage may have slipped, leaving the hot air side slightly open, then the mixture will be lean and because the lower half interior of the cowl is significantly lower pressure than the ram air, the manifold pressure will be lower. I would check the butterfly linkage to make sure the butterfly to hot air is completely closed when you intending to be running direct ram/outside air. If the linkage has slipped, this could be the reason that you have noticed a change appear all of a sudden. Maybe while pulling the carb heat on too hard you could have caused the linkage to “redadjust”?

 

Cheers,

Jay

 

From: Q-LIST@... <Q-LIST@...>
Sent: Monday, April 01, 2019 5:51 AM
To: Q-LIST@...
Subject: [Q-LIST] Re: Typical RPM on Static Ground Test?

 

 

Is the screen the fuel inlet on intake or something else?


Re: Typical RPM on Static Ground Test?

Jay Scheevel
 

That sounds like what it is Sam. Looks like a great system.  Here is the video of Corbin scratching his head about the problem you helped him solve. The best view of the system and the component I was asking about is at 1:43 in the video. Thanks for the reference material.

 

Cheers,

Jay

 

https://youtu.be/azNk7yIp4I0

 

 

 

From: Q-LIST@...
Sent: Thursday, April 04, 2019 2:27 PM
To: Q-LIST@...
Subject: Re: [Q-LIST] Re: Typical RPM on Static Ground Test?

 

 

Jay, I can't seem to locate the video, but I believe you are talkin about the part of the device that measures the mass air flow and then apportions the fuel to the flow divider. Here is a link to the page, go to the API page and you can see the owner's manual for this system.

 

 

On Thu, Apr 4, 2019, 9:30 AM 'Jay Scheevel SGT' jay@... [Q-LIST] <Q-LIST@...> wrote:

 

Thanks for that info, Sam. From the video, it looks like there is a hockey-puck sized device on top of the induction tube, in front of the bend leading to the throttle. It has a hose fitted to it (looks like fuel line). What is the purpose of that? Thanks.

 

Cheers,

Jay

 

From: Q-LIST@... <Q-LIST@...>
Sent: Thursday, April 04, 2019 5:09 AM
To: Q-LIST@...
Subject: Re: [Q-LIST] Re: Typical RPM on Static Ground Test?

 

 

This might be old news, but I thought I would correct it just for the record. This is an air flow performance fuel injection system, which utilizes a fuel injector mounted on the intake port of each cylinder. There is no carburetor and there is no carburetor heat. 

 

The system is set up so you can use filtered air or unfiltered air, your choice. There's a control in the cockpit that allows you to make the switch. So obviously, if you are on ground operations and you want to be having filtered air  you put pull that on. If you're looking for performance you use the unfiltered.

 

I really like the setup, and the Builder did a really nice job of installation. If I was to do mine over, I would probably use this airflow performance system rather than the automotive type injectors that I have.

 

For what it's worth, I do not have an air filter on my engine. I think that the bugs I ingest improve cylinder lubrication.

 

Sam

On Mon, Apr 1, 2019, 11:28 AM 'Jay Scheevel SGT' jay@... [Q-LIST] <Q-LIST@...> wrote:

 

Saw one more thing in your video that could result in your manifold pressure, mixture and performance changes. Your air intake manifold appears to be set up to take carb heat through a cone filter inside the lower cowl area, and/or ram air directly from the exterior scoop. There appears to be a linked pair of butterflies to open/close depending on the carb heat selector setting. If this linkage may have slipped, leaving the hot air side slightly open, then the mixture will be lean and because the lower half interior of the cowl is significantly lower pressure than the ram air, the manifold pressure will be lower. I would check the butterfly linkage to make sure the butterfly to hot air is completely closed when you intending to be running direct ram/outside air. If the linkage has slipped, this could be the reason that you have noticed a change appear all of a sudden. Maybe while pulling the carb heat on too hard you could have caused the linkage to “redadjust”?

 

Cheers,

Jay

 

From: Q-LIST@... <Q-LIST@...>
Sent: Monday, April 01, 2019 5:51 AM
To: Q-LIST@...
Subject: [Q-LIST] Re: Typical RPM on Static Ground Test?

 

 

Is the screen the fuel inlet on intake or something else?


Re: Typical RPM on Static Ground Test?

Sam Hoskins
 

Jay, I can't seem to locate the video, but I believe you are talkin about the part of the device that measures the mass air flow and then apportions the fuel to the flow divider. Here is a link to the page, go to the API page and you can see the owner's manual for this system.


On Thu, Apr 4, 2019, 9:30 AM 'Jay Scheevel SGT' jay@... [Q-LIST] <Q-LIST@...> wrote:
 

Thanks for that info, Sam. From the video, it looks like there is a hockey-puck sized device on top of the induction tube, in front of the bend leading to the throttle. It has a hose fitted to it (looks like fuel line). What is the purpose of that? Thanks.

 

Cheers,

Jay

 

From: Q-LIST@... <Q-LIST@...>
Sent: Thursday, April 04, 2019 5:09 AM
To: Q-LIST@...
Subject: Re: [Q-LIST] Re: Typical RPM on Static Ground Test?

 

 

This might be old news, but I thought I would correct it just for the record. This is an air flow performance fuel injection system, which utilizes a fuel injector mounted on the intake port of each cylinder. There is no carburetor and there is no carburetor heat. 

 

The system is set up so you can use filtered air or unfiltered air, your choice. There's a control in the cockpit that allows you to make the switch. So obviously, if you are on ground operations and you want to be having filtered air  you put pull that on. If you're looking for performance you use the unfiltered.

 

I really like the setup, and the Builder did a really nice job of installation. If I was to do mine over, I would probably use this airflow performance system rather than the automotive type injectors that I have.

 

For what it's worth, I do not have an air filter on my engine. I think that the bugs I ingest improve cylinder lubrication.

 

Sam

On Mon, Apr 1, 2019, 11:28 AM 'Jay Scheevel SGT' jay@... [Q-LIST] <Q-LIST@...> wrote:

 

Saw one more thing in your video that could result in your manifold pressure, mixture and performance changes. Your air intake manifold appears to be set up to take carb heat through a cone filter inside the lower cowl area, and/or ram air directly from the exterior scoop. There appears to be a linked pair of butterflies to open/close depending on the carb heat selector setting. If this linkage may have slipped, leaving the hot air side slightly open, then the mixture will be lean and because the lower half interior of the cowl is significantly lower pressure than the ram air, the manifold pressure will be lower. I would check the butterfly linkage to make sure the butterfly to hot air is completely closed when you intending to be running direct ram/outside air. If the linkage has slipped, this could be the reason that you have noticed a change appear all of a sudden. Maybe while pulling the carb heat on too hard you could have caused the linkage to “redadjust”?

 

Cheers,

Jay

 

From: Q-LIST@... <Q-LIST@...>
Sent: Monday, April 01, 2019 5:51 AM
To: Q-LIST@...
Subject: [Q-LIST] Re: Typical RPM on Static Ground Test?

 

 

Is the screen the fuel inlet on intake or something else?


Re: Typical RPM on Static Ground Test?

Jay Scheevel
 

Thanks for that info, Sam. From the video, it looks like there is a hockey-puck sized device on top of the induction tube, in front of the bend leading to the throttle. It has a hose fitted to it (looks like fuel line). What is the purpose of that? Thanks.

 

Cheers,

Jay

 

From: Q-LIST@...
Sent: Thursday, April 04, 2019 5:09 AM
To: Q-LIST@...
Subject: Re: [Q-LIST] Re: Typical RPM on Static Ground Test?

 

 

This might be old news, but I thought I would correct it just for the record. This is an air flow performance fuel injection system, which utilizes a fuel injector mounted on the intake port of each cylinder. There is no carburetor and there is no carburetor heat. 

 

The system is set up so you can use filtered air or unfiltered air, your choice. There's a control in the cockpit that allows you to make the switch. So obviously, if you are on ground operations and you want to be having filtered air  you put pull that on. If you're looking for performance you use the unfiltered.

 

I really like the setup, and the Builder did a really nice job of installation. If I was to do mine over, I would probably use this airflow performance system rather than the automotive type injectors that I have.

 

For what it's worth, I do not have an air filter on my engine. I think that the bugs I ingest improve cylinder lubrication.

 

Sam

On Mon, Apr 1, 2019, 11:28 AM 'Jay Scheevel SGT' jay@... [Q-LIST] <Q-LIST@...> wrote:

 

Saw one more thing in your video that could result in your manifold pressure, mixture and performance changes. Your air intake manifold appears to be set up to take carb heat through a cone filter inside the lower cowl area, and/or ram air directly from the exterior scoop. There appears to be a linked pair of butterflies to open/close depending on the carb heat selector setting. If this linkage may have slipped, leaving the hot air side slightly open, then the mixture will be lean and because the lower half interior of the cowl is significantly lower pressure than the ram air, the manifold pressure will be lower. I would check the butterfly linkage to make sure the butterfly to hot air is completely closed when you intending to be running direct ram/outside air. If the linkage has slipped, this could be the reason that you have noticed a change appear all of a sudden. Maybe while pulling the carb heat on too hard you could have caused the linkage to “redadjust”?

 

Cheers,

Jay

 

From: Q-LIST@... <Q-LIST@...>
Sent: Monday, April 01, 2019 5:51 AM
To: Q-LIST@...
Subject: [Q-LIST] Re: Typical RPM on Static Ground Test?

 

 

Is the screen the fuel inlet on intake or something else?

8081 - 8100 of 55461