Date   

Re: Engine installation

Bruce Crain
 


Re: Engine installation

Patrick Panzera
 

Hi Bruce, 

I'm just wondering how you came up with 207 lbs for the Revmaster? 

Thanks! 

Pat


On Apr 18, 2017 8:04 PM, "'jcrain2@...' jcrain2@... [Q-LIST]" <Q-LIST@...> wrote:
 

With an engine that weighs only 167 lbs and putting out 107 hp you should have a rocket!  You're a good 75 lbs lighter than the Continental 0200 and 40 lbs lighter than the Revmaster!  If the rest of the air frame is light and straight.  You might be able to put the battery next to the PAX right calf if the weight and balance works out.  Don't the UL engines pick up the horse power by upping the rpm a bit say 2700 to 3000?  Jay Scheevel what say you about the engine center line?  Is there a good reason for that?  The float planes don't seem to be much interested in engine center line (see Sea Wind Aircraft).  If you end up cruising about 180 mph you could open up something new and exciting for the Quickie!
Got our eyes on you Bro!
Bruce Crain
   Reply to sender






Re: Engine installation

Murry Rozansky
 

Engine weights are difficult to pin down. Installed verses dry.  Does FWF include prop? Cowling? etc. UL and Jabaru both rate their engines at > 3000 rpm; that is why their power to weight looks better than O-200 and O-235(3). That means a smaller prop but that is not much of a negative on a clean, fast aircraft like a Q.  Any Rotax  four stroke engines on Qs? Being geared, they can swing a bigger prop and would be a bit of a challenge to prop correctly.
 
Murry
 

From: 'jcrain2@...' jcrain2@... [Q-LIST]
Sent: Tuesday, April 18, 2017 8:02 PM
To: Q-LIST@...
Subject: Re: [Q-LIST] Engine installation
 
 

With an engine that weighs only 167 lbs and putting out 107 hp you should have a rocket!  You're a good 75 lbs lighter than the Continental 0200 and 40 lbs lighter than the Revmaster!  If the rest of the air frame is light and straight.  You might be able to put the battery next to the PAX right calf if the weight and balance works out.  Don't the UL engines pick up the horse power by upping the rpm a bit say 2700 to 3000?  Jay Scheevel what say you about the engine center line?  Is there a good reason for that?  The float planes don't seem to be much interested in engine center line (see Sea Wind Aircraft).  If you end up cruising about 180 mph you could open up something new and exciting for the Quickie!
Got our eyes on you Bro!
Bruce Crain

---------- Original Message ----------
From: "johnogr@... [Q-LIST]"
To: Q-LIST@...
Subject: [Q-LIST] Engine installation
Date: 18 Apr 2017 22:58:26 +0000

 

Hi all
In short l am building a Q2 and not far from installing an UL260isa engine. It has been suggested that the engines center line be lowered by one and three eighths of an inch from the VW engine centre line as shown in the plans.
I am a little nervous about lowering the engine as I'm not shore what flight characteristics this may change.
As some of you have installed different sized and weight engines, what have others done.
Any suggestions would be appreciated.
Ray
OZ

 



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Re: Engine installation

Bruce Crain
 


Engine installation

Raymond Johnson
 

Hi all
In short l am building a Q2 and not far from installing an UL260isa engine. It has been suggested that the engines center line be lowered by one and three eighths of an inch from the VW engine centre line as shown in the plans.
I am a little nervous about lowering the engine as I'm not shore what flight characteristics this may change.
As some of you have installed different sized and weight engines, what have others done.
Any suggestions would be appreciated.
Ray
OZ


Re: Quickie Tri-Q200

Jay Scheevel
 

Hi Jon,

I will echo what Imron said. I have about 600+ hours in a Cherokee 235 (old constant chord or "Hersey Bar" wing). It has the same power loading, and wing loading as the Q, so as a result, the pattern numbers are nearly the same as the Tri-Q-200.  If you do not use flaps, it lands at nearly the same speed as the Tri-Q. The Cherokee also has a laminar flow wing, that gives as very solid sink rate, once it gets at high angle of attack and has a limited flare and float at low airspeed in ground effect, but it does have a steeper approach than the Q because it is draggier.

You may want to give it a try if you can find one to fly. Other than those details, there is not much in common with a Q. In other words, the Cherokee ground handling is nothing like a Tri-Q and of course the sight picture is different for the pilot and the more sluggish handling in the air is nothing like a Q, but flying one may get you comfortable with approach speeds and the concept of "getting behind the curve", on a laminar flow wing which is a valuable lesson.

Cheers,
Jay Scheevel, Tri-Q, still building


Re: Quickie Tri-Q200

Jay Scheevel
 

Jon,

My answer may not be that helpful to you because I have a Jabiru 3300 engine. But anyway, my alternator is a belt driven B&C 40 amp. The flywheel is on the back of the engine. It has a pulley mounted on it to drive the alternator.

Cheers,
Jay


Re: Quickie Tri-Q200

Jim Patillo
 

Sorry, meant to say 100% full throttle at 7,500' msl

Jim Patillo
N46JP - Q200


Re: Quickie Tri-Q200

quickieaircraft
 

Approaches and landings in the Cherokee with no flaps and power on may be helpful for expecting what to see on final (I found it to be), but its ground handling didn't remind me of the Q's.  I'm choosing to see this as good news because you don't like the Cherokee so it means you'll love the Quickie.

For a student pilot, my reaction is that any flying time is good experience.  I flew every possible airplane model I could find as a student, and while it wasn't probably the fastest way to get a license, I had to focus on the things that were in common to the flying small planes and it has made transitioning between planes easier.


Re: Quickie Tri-Q200

Richard Thomson
 


Re: Quickie Tri-Q200

Eric Waxman <ekwaxman@...>
 

Aircraft cylinders can be removed and reinstalled without re-hone/break-in. I'm a general aviation A&P and I think its common knowledge, done often. Consider all the prop strikes on low-time engines that may occur..What if one had six cylinders(or a Lycoming 720 ;-)

Instead of sliding cylinder off all the way, slide only until wrist pin is exposed, take wrist pin out, leaving piston halfway in cylinder. Set aside cylinder assemblies and secure them(so piston doesn't move). Reverse process when reinstalling cylinder. No break-in required.

Eric

On Mon, Apr 17, 2017 at 2:56 PM, 'Jon Matcho' jonmatcho@... [Q-LIST] <Q-LIST@...> wrote:


Paul Fischer asked:  “BTW, what does the term "IRAN'd" mean?”

 

IRAN:  Inspect and Repair as Necessary.  I have been told to expect $2,500 to open the engine into pieces and inspect tolerances, a $2,500 parts allowance, and $2,500 to put back together.  I am betting it will easily top $10,000 either for parts, inflation, or this equation just isn’t right.

 

Emron wrote:  “Jon, I'm pretty sure that any real tear down is going to require some form of break-in because the cylinders will get a new hone.”

 

Yes, there is little-to-no reasonable choice but to tear down the engine because of a prop strike.

 

Since I do not “want” to afford a rebuild of the MT constant speed hub and two new blades for $8,000+ I am moving the aircraft to use a fixed pitch prop for which I need a different prop extension.  Rather than machine or clamp-on a forward belt-drive slot, I decided to go with a rear-mounted B&C 30-amp alternator.  If I have to move the battery forward I’ll save a couple more pounds in weight.

 

Kevin Boddicker wrote:  “The reason that the alt was moved to the front in the first place was because of the poor design of the mounting hardware with the original Denso alt. Some of the units made metal shavings, some had bad bearings etc.”

 

That was a concern of mine as well and I have heard of issues with gear-driven accessories doing that.  I am not sure of the timing, but there are new alternator gear part numbers that superseded older part numbers which is why I bought new gears to fit the B&C alternator.  I am going to have the engine shop mount and test the alternator.

 

Jay Scheevel wrote:  “Set my alternator up so it can be removed without removing the engine from the plane…”

 

Jay, are you going with a rear mounted gear-driven setup as well?  I plan to use a B&C 30-amp gear-driven alternator in the back and would love to know more about how you’re going to provide access to it without removing the engine.

 

Emron wrote:  “The big area I can see this impacting is your taxi-time familiarity. For the TriQ this will be a lot easier. If ~30 mins won't be enough time, is it possible for you to get taxi-comfortable before the rebuild or in a different aircraft?  It's not clear what your experience is, but I did find that a little bit of Grumman Cheetah/Tiger and Diamond DA/20 time was helpful to me to get used to similar(-ish) ground handling.”

 

I am still a student pilot and am considering having my instructor transitioned into the aircraft (he is willing and is also an A&P) so that he may keep it airworthy and train me in it.  Thanks, I knew about the Grumman but not the Diamond having similar braking.  Do you know if the Piper Cherokee close as well (I do not care for that plane much at all)?

 

Thanks everyone, I am now looking to maintain as much of my existing hardware as possible; replace with new only when necessary – especially considering the challenging transition I will have to break-in the engine. 

 

Jon

 

 

 

Jon Matcho

Repairing a Quickie Tri-Q200 N479E

Quickie Builders Association Administrator www.quickheads.com

Canard Zone Administrator www.canardzone.com

Canard Avaitors Mailing List Administrator https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/canard-aviators

 

 





Re: Quickie Tri-Q200

Jim Patillo
 

John,

Follow the break in advise from the Continental Service Manual and you won't go wrong. Don't use chrome rings or you may regret it. Running hard at 7,500 MSL will break the engine in at about 75% full throttle. Running at 2,500' msl 100% could cause glazing and poor oil consumption. (Mike can let you know shortly).😋

I bought a run out 0200, disassembled everything,
Had all the parts magnafluxed or zyglowed and then had everything yellow tagged before putting it back together. After a couple hundred hours, tore it down and installed high compression pistons and dual electronic Lightspeed Ignitions.

Heed the "Sage"advice on this list. We've been there and done that.


You might want to give Bob Malacek a call and see if he wants to rebuild it for you. He does excellent engine work and had one of the fastest Q200's ever.

As for other planes to fly, try an American Yankee to get the feel of a light, stick sensitive airplane.

Regards,
Jim Patillo
Q200 - N46JP


Re: Quickie Tri-Q200

Bruce Crain
 


Re: Quickie Tri-Q200

Jerry Marstall <jnmarstall@...>
 

I have been running a Denso since 1997.  First on the Revmaster and now on the 0-200.  Charges at idle. No problems.

Jerry

 

From: Q-LIST@... [mailto:Q-LIST@...]
Sent: Monday, April 17, 2017 7:36 PM
To: Quickie List
Subject: RE: [Q-LIST] Quickie Tri-Q200

 

 

I have had the B&C 30 amp alternator for several years.  It works great. Just remember that it doesn't produce power until 1,500 RPM or so. 


Sam

Sent via wireless Gizmo.

 

On Apr 17, 2017 4:56 PM, "'Jon Matcho' jonmatcho@... [Q-LIST]" <Q-LIST@...> wrote:

 

Paul Fischer asked:  “BTW, what does the term "IRAN'd" mean?”

 

IRAN:  Inspect and Repair as Necessary.  I have been told to expect $2,500 to open the engine into pieces and inspect tolerances, a $2,500 parts allowance, and $2,500 to put back together.  I am betting it will easily top $10,000 either for parts, inflation, or this equation just isn’t right

 

Emron wrote:  “Jon, I'm pretty sure that any real tear down is going to require some form of break-in because the cylinders will get a new hone.”

 

Yes, there is little-to-no reasonable choice but to tear down the engine because of a prop strike.

 

Since I do not “want” to afford a rebuild of the MT constant speed hub and two new blades for $8,000+ I am moving the aircraft to use a fixed pitch prop for which I need a different prop extension.  Rather than machine or clamp-on a forward belt-drive slot, I decided to go with a rear-mounted B&C 30-amp alternator.  If I have to move the battery forward I’ll save a couple more pounds in weight.

 

Kevin Boddicker wrote:  “The reason that the alt was moved to the front in the first place was because of the poor design of the mounting hardware with the original Denso alt. Some of the units made metal shavings, some had bad bearings etc.”

 

That was a concern of mine as well and I have heard of issues with gear-driven accessories doing that.  I am not sure of the timing, but there are new alternator gear part numbers that superseded older part numbers which is why I bought new gears to fit the B&C alternator.  I am going to have the engine shop mount and test the alternator.

 

Jay Scheevel wrote:  “Set my alternator up so it can be removed without removing the engine from the plane…”

 

Jay, are you going with a rear mounted gear-driven setup as well?  I plan to use a B&C 30-amp gear-driven alternator in the back and would love to know more about how you’re going to provide access to it without removing the engine.

 

Emron wrote:  “The big area I can see this impacting is your taxi-time familiarity. For the TriQ this will be a lot easier. If ~30 mins won't be enough time, is it possible for you to get taxi-comfortable before the rebuild or in a different aircraft?  It's not clear what your experience is, but I did find that a little bit of Grumman Cheetah/Tiger and Diamond DA/20 time was helpful to me to get used to similar(-ish) ground handling.”

 

I am still a student pilot and am considering having my instructor transitioned into the aircraft (he is willing and is also an A&P) so that he may keep it airworthy and train me in it.  Thanks, I knew about the Grumman but not the Diamond having similar braking.  Do you know if the Piper Cherokee close as well (I do not care for that plane much at all)?

 

Thanks everyone, I am now looking to maintain as much of my existing hardware as possible; replace with new only when necessary – especially considering the challenging transition I will have to break-in the engine. 

 

Jon

 

 

 

Jon Matcho

Repairing a Quickie Tri-Q200 N479E

Quickie Builders Association Administrator www.quickheads.com

Canard Zone Administrator www.canardzone.com

Canard Avaitors Mailing List Administrator https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/canard-aviators

 

 


Re: Quickie Tri-Q200

Sam Hoskins
 

I have had the B&C 30 amp alternator for several years.  It works great. Just remember that it doesn't produce power until 1,500 RPM or so. 


Sam

Sent via wireless Gizmo.

On Apr 17, 2017 4:56 PM, "'Jon Matcho' jonmatcho@... [Q-LIST]" <Q-LIST@...> wrote:
 

Paul Fischer asked:  “BTW, what does the term "IRAN'd" mean?”

 

IRAN:  Inspect and Repair as Necessary.  I have been told to expect $2,500 to open the engine into pieces and inspect tolerances, a $2,500 parts allowance, and $2,500 to put back together.  I am betting it will easily top $10,000 either for parts, inflation, or this equation just isn’t right.

 

Emron wrote:  “Jon, I'm pretty sure that any real tear down is going to require some form of break-in because the cylinders will get a new hone.”

 

Yes, there is little-to-no reasonable choice but to tear down the engine because of a prop strike.

 

Since I do not “want” to afford a rebuild of the MT constant speed hub and two new blades for $8,000+ I am moving the aircraft to use a fixed pitch prop for which I need a different prop extension.  Rather than machine or clamp-on a forward belt-drive slot, I decided to go with a rear-mounted B&C 30-amp alternator.  If I have to move the battery forward I’ll save a couple more pounds in weight.

 

Kevin Boddicker wrote:  “The reason that the alt was moved to the front in the first place was because of the poor design of the mounting hardware with the original Denso alt. Some of the units made metal shavings, some had bad bearings etc.”

 

That was a concern of mine as well and I have heard of issues with gear-driven accessories doing that.  I am not sure of the timing, but there are new alternator gear part numbers that superseded older part numbers which is why I bought new gears to fit the B&C alternator.  I am going to have the engine shop mount and test the alternator.

 

Jay Scheevel wrote:  “Set my alternator up so it can be removed without removing the engine from the plane…”

 

Jay, are you going with a rear mounted gear-driven setup as well?  I plan to use a B&C 30-amp gear-driven alternator in the back and would love to know more about how you’re going to provide access to it without removing the engine.

 

Emron wrote:  “The big area I can see this impacting is your taxi-time familiarity. For the TriQ this will be a lot easier. If ~30 mins won't be enough time, is it possible for you to get taxi-comfortable before the rebuild or in a different aircraft?  It's not clear what your experience is, but I did find that a little bit of Grumman Cheetah/Tiger and Diamond DA/20 time was helpful to me to get used to similar(-ish) ground handling.”

 

I am still a student pilot and am considering having my instructor transitioned into the aircraft (he is willing and is also an A&P) so that he may keep it airworthy and train me in it.  Thanks, I knew about the Grumman but not the Diamond having similar braking.  Do you know if the Piper Cherokee close as well (I do not care for that plane much at all)?

 

Thanks everyone, I am now looking to maintain as much of my existing hardware as possible; replace with new only when necessary – especially considering the challenging transition I will have to break-in the engine. 

 

Jon

 

 

 

Jon Matcho

Repairing a Quickie Tri-Q200 N479E

Quickie Builders Association Administrator www.quickheads.com

Canard Zone Administrator www.canardzone.com

Canard Avaitors Mailing List Administrator https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/canard-aviators

 

 


Re: Quickie Tri-Q200

Jon Matcho
 

Paul Fischer asked:  “BTW, what does the term "IRAN'd" mean?”

 

IRAN:  Inspect and Repair as Necessary.  I have been told to expect $2,500 to open the engine into pieces and inspect tolerances, a $2,500 parts allowance, and $2,500 to put back together.  I am betting it will easily top $10,000 either for parts, inflation, or this equation just isn’t right.

 

Emron wrote:  “Jon, I'm pretty sure that any real tear down is going to require some form of break-in because the cylinders will get a new hone.”

 

Yes, there is little-to-no reasonable choice but to tear down the engine because of a prop strike.

 

Since I do not “want” to afford a rebuild of the MT constant speed hub and two new blades for $8,000+ I am moving the aircraft to use a fixed pitch prop for which I need a different prop extension.  Rather than machine or clamp-on a forward belt-drive slot, I decided to go with a rear-mounted B&C 30-amp alternator.  If I have to move the battery forward I’ll save a couple more pounds in weight.

 

Kevin Boddicker wrote:  “The reason that the alt was moved to the front in the first place was because of the poor design of the mounting hardware with the original Denso alt. Some of the units made metal shavings, some had bad bearings etc.”

 

That was a concern of mine as well and I have heard of issues with gear-driven accessories doing that.  I am not sure of the timing, but there are new alternator gear part numbers that superseded older part numbers which is why I bought new gears to fit the B&C alternator.  I am going to have the engine shop mount and test the alternator.

 

Jay Scheevel wrote:  “Set my alternator up so it can be removed without removing the engine from the plane…”

 

Jay, are you going with a rear mounted gear-driven setup as well?  I plan to use a B&C 30-amp gear-driven alternator in the back and would love to know more about how you’re going to provide access to it without removing the engine.

 

Emron wrote:  “The big area I can see this impacting is your taxi-time familiarity. For the TriQ this will be a lot easier. If ~30 mins won't be enough time, is it possible for you to get taxi-comfortable before the rebuild or in a different aircraft?  It's not clear what your experience is, but I did find that a little bit of Grumman Cheetah/Tiger and Diamond DA/20 time was helpful to me to get used to similar(-ish) ground handling.”

 

I am still a student pilot and am considering having my instructor transitioned into the aircraft (he is willing and is also an A&P) so that he may keep it airworthy and train me in it.  Thanks, I knew about the Grumman but not the Diamond having similar braking.  Do you know if the Piper Cherokee close as well (I do not care for that plane much at all)?

 

Thanks everyone, I am now looking to maintain as much of my existing hardware as possible; replace with new only when necessary – especially considering the challenging transition I will have to break-in the engine. 

 

Jon

 

 

 

Jon Matcho

Repairing a Quickie Tri-Q200 N479E

Quickie Builders Association Administrator www.quickheads.com

Canard Zone Administrator www.canardzone.com

Canard Avaitors Mailing List Administrator https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/canard-aviators

 

 


Re: Quickie Tri-Q200

Jay Scheevel
 

Set my alternator up so it can be removed without removing the engine from the plane, so I hope that it follows the same rule as Paul's and never gives me trouble. In fact, almost everything I put on my plane was designed so that it could be removed fairly easily for maintenance. I am hoping that, according to Paul's rule, the entire plane will be very reliable.

Cheers,
Jay Scheevel, Tri-Q, still building


Re: Quickie Tri-Q200

Paul Fisher
 

Agreed Kevin!  I played that game too.  I don't know how many times I took the engine off and back on again trying to resolve my alternator problem, but I know it was a LOT!  I put a belt driven B&C alternator up front and it hasn't given me a lick of problem since.  I think the lesson is - if you make it easy to work on, you won't have to work on it!!

Just for another data point - my battery is in the tail just aft of the split line right in front of the bulkhead (FS120?).  Other than needing long (heavy) battery cables, it has worked well there.  But mine is a conventional gear, not a Tri-Q, so this may not be relevant!

BTW, what does the term "IRAN'd" mean? 

Paul Fisher
Q-200, N17PF

On Sat, Apr 15, 2017 at 11:10 AM, Kevin Boddicker trumanst@... [Q-LIST] <Q-LIST@...> wrote:
 

Jon,

I would leave the alternator up front unless you just can’t stand it.
I do have a Plane Power alternator on the rear of my engine, and have had no trouble. 
The reason that the alt was moved to the front in the first place was because of the poor design of the mounting hardware with the original Denso alt. Some of the units made metal shavings, some had bad bearings etc.
Each time there was a problem, the engine had to come off, no small task! Don’t ask how I know, but seven times the first year will educate one.
I would leave the alt there until it needs to be replaced for whatever reason, and then make a decision, fore or aft.
my 2 cents.





Kevin Boddicker
TriQ 200 N7868B   416 hrs
Luana, IA.



On Apr 15, 2017, at 7:35 AM, 'Jon Matcho' jonmatcho@... [Q-LIST] <Q-LIST@...> wrote:


Hello, thanks for the replies.  I left out a detail that this was a flying Tri-Q200 with ~1,200 hours on the airframe and more on the engine.  It’s been well kept, but with the nose gear collapse and prop strike I am having a full tear-down done by a certified shop.  Is it possible to have my O-200 IRAN’d and not need a break-in?

 

Going from the 40lb MT constant speed prop to a fixed pitch and moving the alternator to the rear of the engine, I am expecting to move one or both batteries back to the firewall.  I am not sure how the W&B will come in just yet, but this may be close to a prior configuration for this aircraft – I’ll try to find out.

 

I am also wondering how to manage the break-in with essentially a new/repaired engine, new airframe configuration, and new pilot (me).  

 

Thanks again,

Jon

 

 

 

 

Jon Matcho

 

Repairing a Quickie Tri-Q200 N479E

Quickie Builders Association Administrator www.quickheads.com

Canard Zone Administrator www.canardzone.com

Canard Avaitors Mailing List Administrator https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/canard-aviators

 

 





Re: Quickie Tri-Q200

Kevin Boddicker
 

Jon,
I would leave the alternator up front unless you just can’t stand it.
I do have a Plane Power alternator on the rear of my engine, and have had no trouble. 
The reason that the alt was moved to the front in the first place was because of the poor design of the mounting hardware with the original Denso alt. Some of the units made metal shavings, some had bad bearings etc.
Each time there was a problem, the engine had to come off, no small task! Don’t ask how I know, but seven times the first year will educate one.
I would leave the alt there until it needs to be replaced for whatever reason, and then make a decision, fore or aft.
my 2 cents.





Kevin Boddicker
TriQ 200 N7868B   416 hrs
Luana, IA.



On Apr 15, 2017, at 7:35 AM, 'Jon Matcho' jonmatcho@... [Q-LIST] <Q-LIST@...> wrote:


Hello, thanks for the replies.  I left out a detail that this was a flying Tri-Q200 with ~1,200 hours on the airframe and more on the engine.  It’s been well kept, but with the nose gear collapse and prop strike I am having a full tear-down done by a certified shop.  Is it possible to have my O-200 IRAN’d and not need a break-in?

 

Going from the 40lb MT constant speed prop to a fixed pitch and moving the alternator to the rear of the engine, I am expecting to move one or both batteries back to the firewall.  I am not sure how the W&B will come in just yet, but this may be close to a prior configuration for this aircraft – I’ll try to find out.

 

I am also wondering how to manage the break-in with essentially a new/repaired engine, new airframe configuration, and new pilot (me).  

 

Thanks again,

Jon

 

 

 

 

Jon Matcho

 

Repairing a Quickie Tri-Q200 N479E

Quickie Builders Association Administrator www.quickheads.com

Canard Zone Administrator www.canardzone.com

Canard Avaitors Mailing List Administrator https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/canard-aviators

 

 




Re: Quickie Tri-Q200

quickieaircraft
 

Jon, I'm pretty sure that any real tear down is going to require some form of break-in because the cylinders will get a new hone.  Continental wants >75% power for first hour and then alternating 65-75% for the next hour or two. Several mechanics said "go fly to start the break in process right away," but upon further questioning revealed that they regularly run re-assembled engines up to a total of 30-40 mins to get them set up properly before they turn them over to the pilot with instructions to start break-in immediately.

The big area I can see this impacting is your taxi-time familiarity. For the TriQ this will be a lot easier. If ~30 mins won't be enough time, is it possible for you to get taxi-comfortable before the rebuild or in a different aircraft?  It's not clear what your experience is, but I did find that a little bit of Grumman Cheetah/Tiger and Diamond DA/20 time was helpful to me to get used to similar(-ish) ground handling.

Best,
Emron
TriQ200 ~20hrs

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