FW: Rudders big and small


Kevin Fortin <kfortin@...>
 

Hey guys,



Even with the Pitts big rudder, it is still one twitchy bird.



After going thru 10 dual hours of armpit sweating stress in the Pitts,
WITH DUAL HELP, I finally got to solo it. I can't imagine trying to
learn to fly it by myself, which is what you guy have had (or will have)
to do. If I had to learn to fly the Pitts by myself, I am pretty sure at
some point I would blame the airplane and want to start changing it.
This sounds a bit like what some of you are thinking.



In that 10 hours, 80% of what I learned was how to dance the dance on
the rudder pedals. Nothing more. (When I started on the Pitts I had 40
or so hours in a Decathlon).



My thought (and I reserve the right to change it) is, it's most likely
learning to dance the dance on the rudder pedals, not the size of the
rudder.



If the Q is anything like the Pitts, the steepness of the learning curve
is unexpected, to say the least. I admire anyone who can make it through
that on their own.



BTW: I still plan to taxi, taxi, and taxi some more.



Kevin Fortin

sales@...


HawkiDoug <hawkidoug@...>
 

Your getting the idea Kevin!!!

Doug "Hawkeye" Humble
www.asignabove.net
Omaha NE
N25974

----- Original Message -----
From: "Kevin Fortin" <kfortin@...>
To: <q-list@...>
Sent: Wednesday, November 24, 2004 12:13 PM
Subject: [Q-LIST] FW: Rudders big and small


Hey guys,
Even with the Pitts big rudder, it is still one twitchy bird. After going thru 10 dual hours of armpit sweating stress in the Pitts,
WITH DUAL HELP, I finally got to solo it. I can't imagine trying to
learn to fly it by myself, which is what you guy have had (or will have)
to do. If I had to learn to fly the Pitts by myself, I am pretty sure at
some point I would blame the airplane and want to start changing it.
This sounds a bit like what some of you are thinking.
In that 10 hours, 80% of what I learned was how to dance the dance on
the rudder pedals. Nothing more. (When I started on the Pitts I had 40
or so hours in a Decathlon).
My thought (and I reserve the right to change it) is, it's most likely
learning to dance the dance on the rudder pedals, not the size of the
rudder. If the Q is anything like the Pitts, the steepness of the learning curve
is unexpected, to say the least. I admire anyone who can make it through
that on their own.
BTW: I still plan to taxi, taxi, and taxi some more.
Kevin Fortin
sales@...
Quickie Builders Association WEB site
http://www.quickiebuilders.org
Yahoo! Groups Links


haiqu
 

Hi Kevin,

I'm in a similar preparation phase for the arrival of my Quickie. Even
though I don't expect it to be flying for 12 months I decided that it
was time to do some more flying again. Previous experience was 20
hours in a Warrior, which is like driving a bus, and that was 18 years
ago anyhow.

So last week I headed 200km off to a small aerodrome in Yarram,
Victoria for some ultralight lessons. Before going the CFI asked me by
email what I thought I'd need to get an UL license and I brashly said
"Oh, about 3 hrs dual and 5-7 solo". Hah!! What I didn't realize I
could write a book about, and that statement sure looks stupid now.

Yarram airfield is between the coast and a small mountain range, and
it's almost summer. The only time you can fly as a student is two
hours in the morning and evenings, the rest of the time there's so
much thermal activity it just gets too bumpy. But there's also the
onshore breezes and adiabatic winds to contend with, and most takeoffs
were into a 10-15 kt crosswind.

So although I managed to fly the area fairly well after a couple of
hours, I could never manage a landing without the instructor having to
help out, and the takeoffs weren't all that straight either. So I
would highly recommend some time in a Thruster or similar two-seater
taildragger ultralight as damned good experience prior to taking to
the skies in a Q.

This is also the first time I've found an airport that even vaguely
approximates the kind of grassroots ambiance seen in the USA. My
previous school in Lilydale was all business and filled with youngish
instructors who were just on a stepping-stone to a better commercial
job. You could hang around all day and learn nothing at all. Yarram
was full of relatively old guys - and I'm 51 so speaking in the
absolute sense they were ancient - who had mostly built their own
airplanes and knew every bolt, and who were keen to talk about them.

The barbeque on Sunday brought out a Jodel, several Jabirus, a
beautiful new Kara One, an ancient Zenair and even an autogyro. During
the week I got a ride in a Lightwing, and saw several other
interesting craft from a single-seat Jeep to an Airvan and a Seneca
II. Yarram is also a stepping-stone to Tasmania, and a very schmick
C-150 driven by an American couple refuelled midweek on route
Launceston to visit their daughters. The place was literally hopping
with fanatical fliers. Needless to say, I joined the local club and
will be going back again regularly.

I got home last night humbled, sunburnt and with an 88% pass in the
BAK on my logbook. It was a great week, now all I need is to do some
more flying.

Rob

--- In Q-LIST@..., "Kevin Fortin" <kfortin@p...> wrote:


Hey guys,



Even with the Pitts big rudder, it is still one twitchy bird.



After going thru 10 dual hours of armpit sweating stress in the Pitts,
WITH DUAL HELP, I finally got to solo it. I can't imagine trying to
learn to fly it by myself, which is what you guy have had (or will have)
to do. If I had to learn to fly the Pitts by myself, I am pretty sure at
some point I would blame the airplane and want to start changing it.
This sounds a bit like what some of you are thinking.



In that 10 hours, 80% of what I learned was how to dance the dance on
the rudder pedals. Nothing more. (When I started on the Pitts I had 40
or so hours in a Decathlon).



My thought (and I reserve the right to change it) is, it's most likely
learning to dance the dance on the rudder pedals, not the size of the
rudder.



If the Q is anything like the Pitts, the steepness of the learning curve
is unexpected, to say the least. I admire anyone who can make it through
that on their own.



BTW: I still plan to taxi, taxi, and taxi some more.



Kevin Fortin

sales@p...














John ten Have <Jtenhave@...>
 

Rob,

may I suggest a few laps in a glass sailplane as well? The accuracy required to fly a sailplane and the sensitivity of control is a very good indicator of the required standard. As is the need to grip up speed control, attitude flying and all those things that make the difference in something that will punish you if you do not get it right. - not to mention engine out familiarity.

John

----- Original Message -----
From: HAIQU_OZ
To: Q-LIST@...
Sent: Tuesday, November 30, 2004 11:34 AM
Subject: [Q-LIST] Re: FW: Rudders big and small



Hi Kevin,

I'm in a similar preparation phase for the arrival of my Quickie. Even
though I don't expect it to be flying for 12 months I decided that it
was time to do some more flying again. Previous experience was 20
hours in a Warrior, which is like driving a bus, and that was 18 years
ago anyhow.

So last week I headed 200km off to a small aerodrome in Yarram,
Victoria for some ultralight lessons. Before going the CFI asked me by
email what I thought I'd need to get an UL license and I brashly said
"Oh, about 3 hrs dual and 5-7 solo". Hah!! What I didn't realize I
could write a book about, and that statement sure looks stupid now.

Yarram airfield is between the coast and a small mountain range, and
it's almost summer. The only time you can fly as a student is two
hours in the morning and evenings, the rest of the time there's so
much thermal activity it just gets too bumpy. But there's also the
onshore breezes and adiabatic winds to contend with, and most takeoffs
were into a 10-15 kt crosswind.

So although I managed to fly the area fairly well after a couple of
hours, I could never manage a landing without the instructor having to
help out, and the takeoffs weren't all that straight either. So I
would highly recommend some time in a Thruster or similar two-seater
taildragger ultralight as damned good experience prior to taking to
the skies in a Q.

This is also the first time I've found an airport that even vaguely
approximates the kind of grassroots ambiance seen in the USA. My
previous school in Lilydale was all business and filled with youngish
instructors who were just on a stepping-stone to a better commercial
job. You could hang around all day and learn nothing at all. Yarram
was full of relatively old guys - and I'm 51 so speaking in the
absolute sense they were ancient - who had mostly built their own
airplanes and knew every bolt, and who were keen to talk about them.

The barbeque on Sunday brought out a Jodel, several Jabirus, a
beautiful new Kara One, an ancient Zenair and even an autogyro. During
the week I got a ride in a Lightwing, and saw several other
interesting craft from a single-seat Jeep to an Airvan and a Seneca
II. Yarram is also a stepping-stone to Tasmania, and a very schmick
C-150 driven by an American couple refuelled midweek on route
Launceston to visit their daughters. The place was literally hopping
with fanatical fliers. Needless to say, I joined the local club and
will be going back again regularly.

I got home last night humbled, sunburnt and with an 88% pass in the
BAK on my logbook. It was a great week, now all I need is to do some
more flying.

Rob


--- In Q-LIST@..., "Kevin Fortin" <kfortin@p...> wrote:
>
>
> Hey guys,
>
>
>
> Even with the Pitts big rudder, it is still one twitchy bird.
>
>
>
> After going thru 10 dual hours of armpit sweating stress in the Pitts,
> WITH DUAL HELP, I finally got to solo it. I can't imagine trying to
> learn to fly it by myself, which is what you guy have had (or will have)
> to do. If I had to learn to fly the Pitts by myself, I am pretty sure at
> some point I would blame the airplane and want to start changing it.
> This sounds a bit like what some of you are thinking.
>
>
>
> In that 10 hours, 80% of what I learned was how to dance the dance on
> the rudder pedals. Nothing more. (When I started on the Pitts I had 40
> or so hours in a Decathlon).
>
>
>
> My thought (and I reserve the right to change it) is, it's most likely
> learning to dance the dance on the rudder pedals, not the size of the
> rudder.
>
>
>
> If the Q is anything like the Pitts, the steepness of the learning curve
> is unexpected, to say the least. I admire anyone who can make it through
> that on their own.
>
>
>
> BTW: I still plan to taxi, taxi, and taxi some more.
>
>
>
> Kevin Fortin
>
> sales@p...
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>





Quickie Builders Association WEB site
http://www.quickiebuilders.org




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haiqu
 

Hi John,

I dropped into Leongatha on the way back and there's plenty of gliding
going on at that strip. It's only an hour from here so I'll be likely
to take that advice. One of my friends (who is coming over tonight for
a beer) is a long-time glider pilot, so I'll be enlisting his assistance.

Rob

--- In Q-LIST@..., "John ten Have" <Jtenhave@m...> wrote:
Rob,

may I suggest a few laps in a glass sailplane as well? The
accuracy required to fly a sailplane and the sensitivity of control is
a very good indicator of the required standard. As is the need to grip
up speed control, attitude flying and all those things that make the
difference in something that will punish you if you do not get it
right. - not to mention engine out familiarity.

John


John ten Have <Jtenhave@...>
 

with the beer?

John

----- Original Message -----
From: HAIQU_OZ
To: Q-LIST@...
Sent: Tuesday, November 30, 2004 12:31 PM
Subject: [Q-LIST] Re: FW: Rudders big and small



Hi John,

I dropped into Leongatha on the way back and there's plenty of gliding
going on at that strip. It's only an hour from here so I'll be likely
to take that advice. One of my friends (who is coming over tonight for
a beer) is a long-time glider pilot, so I'll be enlisting his assistance.

Rob

--- In Q-LIST@..., "John ten Have" <Jtenhave@m...> wrote:
> Rob,
>
> may I suggest a few laps in a glass sailplane as well? The
accuracy required to fly a sailplane and the sensitivity of control is
a very good indicator of the required standard. As is the need to grip
up speed control, attitude flying and all those things that make the
difference in something that will punish you if you do not get it
right. - not to mention engine out familiarity.
>
> John






Quickie Builders Association WEB site
http://www.quickiebuilders.org




Yahoo! Groups Sponsor

Get unlimited calls to

U.S./Canada




------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Yahoo! Groups Links

a.. To visit your group on the web, go to:
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haiqu
 

Heh. Yeah, that too.

--- In Q-LIST@..., "John ten Have" <Jtenhave@m...> wrote:
with the beer?

John
----- Original Message -----
From: HAIQU_OZ
To: Q-LIST@...
Sent: Tuesday, November 30, 2004 12:31 PM
Subject: [Q-LIST] Re: FW: Rudders big and small



Hi John,

I dropped into Leongatha on the way back and there's plenty of gliding
going on at that strip. It's only an hour from here so I'll be likely
to take that advice. One of my friends (who is coming over tonight for
a beer) is a long-time glider pilot, so I'll be enlisting his
assistance.

Rob

--- In Q-LIST@..., "John ten Have" <Jtenhave@m...> wrote:
> Rob,
>
> may I suggest a few laps in a glass sailplane as well? The
accuracy required to fly a sailplane and the sensitivity of control is
a very good indicator of the required standard. As is the need to grip
up speed control, attitude flying and all those things that make the
difference in something that will punish you if you do not get it
right. - not to mention engine out familiarity.
>
> John






Quickie Builders Association WEB site
http://www.quickiebuilders.org




Yahoo! Groups Sponsor

Get unlimited calls to

U.S./Canada




------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Yahoo! Groups Links

a.. To visit your group on the web, go to:
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b.. To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
Q-LIST-unsubscribe@...

c.. Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of
Service.




Arthur & Margaret <warreen@...>
 

Rob, you told me that you would have fixed up the problems in 4 to 5 hours
and have it flying which is it, I think you have a lot to learn maybe you
have brought a lemon.

----- Original Message -----
From: "HAIQU_OZ" <judd@...>
To: <Q-LIST@...>
Sent: Tuesday, November 30, 2004 11:34 AM
Subject: [Q-LIST] Re: FW: Rudders big and small




Hi Kevin,

I'm in a similar preparation phase for the arrival of my Quickie. Even
though I don't expect it to be flying for 12 months I decided that it
was time to do some more flying again. Previous experience was 20
hours in a Warrior, which is like driving a bus, and that was 18 years
ago anyhow.

So last week I headed 200km off to a small aerodrome in Yarram,
Victoria for some ultralight lessons. Before going the CFI asked me by
email what I thought I'd need to get an UL license and I brashly said
"Oh, about 3 hrs dual and 5-7 solo". Hah!! What I didn't realize I
could write a book about, and that statement sure looks stupid now.

Yarram airfield is between the coast and a small mountain range, and
it's almost summer. The only time you can fly as a student is two
hours in the morning and evenings, the rest of the time there's so
much thermal activity it just gets too bumpy. But there's also the
onshore breezes and adiabatic winds to contend with, and most takeoffs
were into a 10-15 kt crosswind.

So although I managed to fly the area fairly well after a couple of
hours, I could never manage a landing without the instructor having to
help out, and the takeoffs weren't all that straight either. So I
would highly recommend some time in a Thruster or similar two-seater
taildragger ultralight as damned good experience prior to taking to
the skies in a Q.

This is also the first time I've found an airport that even vaguely
approximates the kind of grassroots ambiance seen in the USA. My
previous school in Lilydale was all business and filled with youngish
instructors who were just on a stepping-stone to a better commercial
job. You could hang around all day and learn nothing at all. Yarram
was full of relatively old guys - and I'm 51 so speaking in the
absolute sense they were ancient - who had mostly built their own
airplanes and knew every bolt, and who were keen to talk about them.

The barbeque on Sunday brought out a Jodel, several Jabirus, a
beautiful new Kara One, an ancient Zenair and even an autogyro. During
the week I got a ride in a Lightwing, and saw several other
interesting craft from a single-seat Jeep to an Airvan and a Seneca
II. Yarram is also a stepping-stone to Tasmania, and a very schmick
C-150 driven by an American couple refuelled midweek on route
Launceston to visit their daughters. The place was literally hopping
with fanatical fliers. Needless to say, I joined the local club and
will be going back again regularly.

I got home last night humbled, sunburnt and with an 88% pass in the
BAK on my logbook. It was a great week, now all I need is to do some
more flying.

Rob


--- In Q-LIST@..., "Kevin Fortin" <kfortin@p...> wrote:


Hey guys,



Even with the Pitts big rudder, it is still one twitchy bird.



After going thru 10 dual hours of armpit sweating stress in the Pitts,
WITH DUAL HELP, I finally got to solo it. I can't imagine trying to
learn to fly it by myself, which is what you guy have had (or will have)
to do. If I had to learn to fly the Pitts by myself, I am pretty sure at
some point I would blame the airplane and want to start changing it.
This sounds a bit like what some of you are thinking.



In that 10 hours, 80% of what I learned was how to dance the dance on
the rudder pedals. Nothing more. (When I started on the Pitts I had 40
or so hours in a Decathlon).



My thought (and I reserve the right to change it) is, it's most likely
learning to dance the dance on the rudder pedals, not the size of the
rudder.



If the Q is anything like the Pitts, the steepness of the learning curve
is unexpected, to say the least. I admire anyone who can make it through
that on their own.



BTW: I still plan to taxi, taxi, and taxi some more.



Kevin Fortin

sales@p...


















Quickie Builders Association WEB site
http://www.quickiebuilders.org


Yahoo! Groups Links







haiqu
 

Arthur,

I said nothing of the sort, either by email or in person, to you or
anyone else. I am perfectly aware of the amount of work involved in
getting this plane flying again.

And it will still cost me a total of around $2000 less - and about 4
years less work - than the shambling pile of Q2 parts you offered me,
even including shipping it here and building the engine. I'm satisfied
with the deal.

Rob


--- In Q-LIST@..., "Arthur & Margaret" <warreen@n...> wrote:
Rob, you told me that you would have fixed up the problems in 4 to 5
hours
and have it flying which is it, I think you have a lot to learn
maybe you
have brought a lemon.
----- Original Message -----
From: "HAIQU_OZ" <judd@o...>
To: <Q-LIST@...>
Sent: Tuesday, November 30, 2004 11:34 AM
Subject: [Q-LIST] Re: FW: Rudders big and small




Hi Kevin,

I'm in a similar preparation phase for the arrival of my Quickie. Even
though I don't expect it to be flying for 12 months I decided that it
was time to do some more flying again. Previous experience was 20
hours in a Warrior, which is like driving a bus, and that was 18 years
ago anyhow.

So last week I headed 200km off to a small aerodrome in Yarram,
Victoria for some ultralight lessons. Before going the CFI asked me by
email what I thought I'd need to get an UL license and I brashly said
"Oh, about 3 hrs dual and 5-7 solo". Hah!! What I didn't realize I
could write a book about, and that statement sure looks stupid now.

Yarram airfield is between the coast and a small mountain range, and
it's almost summer. The only time you can fly as a student is two
hours in the morning and evenings, the rest of the time there's so
much thermal activity it just gets too bumpy. But there's also the
onshore breezes and adiabatic winds to contend with, and most takeoffs
were into a 10-15 kt crosswind.

So although I managed to fly the area fairly well after a couple of
hours, I could never manage a landing without the instructor having to
help out, and the takeoffs weren't all that straight either. So I
would highly recommend some time in a Thruster or similar two-seater
taildragger ultralight as damned good experience prior to taking to
the skies in a Q.

This is also the first time I've found an airport that even vaguely
approximates the kind of grassroots ambiance seen in the USA. My
previous school in Lilydale was all business and filled with youngish
instructors who were just on a stepping-stone to a better commercial
job. You could hang around all day and learn nothing at all. Yarram
was full of relatively old guys - and I'm 51 so speaking in the
absolute sense they were ancient - who had mostly built their own
airplanes and knew every bolt, and who were keen to talk about them.

The barbeque on Sunday brought out a Jodel, several Jabirus, a
beautiful new Kara One, an ancient Zenair and even an autogyro. During
the week I got a ride in a Lightwing, and saw several other
interesting craft from a single-seat Jeep to an Airvan and a Seneca
II. Yarram is also a stepping-stone to Tasmania, and a very schmick
C-150 driven by an American couple refuelled midweek on route
Launceston to visit their daughters. The place was literally hopping
with fanatical fliers. Needless to say, I joined the local club and
will be going back again regularly.

I got home last night humbled, sunburnt and with an 88% pass in the
BAK on my logbook. It was a great week, now all I need is to do some
more flying.

Rob


--- In Q-LIST@..., "Kevin Fortin" <kfortin@p...> wrote:


Hey guys,



Even with the Pitts big rudder, it is still one twitchy bird.



After going thru 10 dual hours of armpit sweating stress in the
Pitts,
WITH DUAL HELP, I finally got to solo it. I can't imagine trying to
learn to fly it by myself, which is what you guy have had (or
will have)
to do. If I had to learn to fly the Pitts by myself, I am pretty
sure at
some point I would blame the airplane and want to start changing it.
This sounds a bit like what some of you are thinking.



In that 10 hours, 80% of what I learned was how to dance the
dance on
the rudder pedals. Nothing more. (When I started on the Pitts I
had 40
or so hours in a Decathlon).



My thought (and I reserve the right to change it) is, it's most
likely
learning to dance the dance on the rudder pedals, not the size
of the
rudder.



If the Q is anything like the Pitts, the steepness of the
learning curve
is unexpected, to say the least. I admire anyone who can make it
through
that on their own.



BTW: I still plan to taxi, taxi, and taxi some more.



Kevin Fortin

sales@p...


















Quickie Builders Association WEB site
http://www.quickiebuilders.org


Yahoo! Groups Links







Arthur & Margaret <warreen@...>
 

Well I am glad to see that you have final seen the light, as to the
shambling pile of Q2 parts, after your remarks on Q-list I had them checked
out by CASA inspector who deals in composites and in his words THIS IS A
VERY GOOD STARTERS KIT. My kit was imported from Seattle in the USA from
David Hiatt who has built his own Q2 and writes on Q-list from time to time
so you are bring his good name into question when you make remarks like
that. I would be v
ery careful in rebuilding the aircraft you have purchased and all work
should be cover by TC if you consider your Safety . Arthur

----- Original Message -----
From: "HAIQU_OZ" <judd@...>
To: <Q-LIST@...>
Sent: Thursday, December 02, 2004 1:34 AM
Subject: [Q-LIST] Re: FW: Rudders big and small




Arthur,

I said nothing of the sort, either by email or in person, to you or
anyone else. I am perfectly aware of the amount of work involved in
getting this plane flying again.

And it will still cost me a total of around $2000 less - and about 4
years less work - than the shambling pile of Q2 parts you offered me,
even including shipping it here and building the engine. I'm satisfied
with the deal.

Rob


--- In Q-LIST@..., "Arthur & Margaret" <warreen@n...> wrote:
Rob, you told me that you would have fixed up the problems in 4 to 5
hours
and have it flying which is it, I think you have a lot to learn
maybe you
have brought a lemon.
----- Original Message -----
From: "HAIQU_OZ" <judd@o...>
To: <Q-LIST@...>
Sent: Tuesday, November 30, 2004 11:34 AM
Subject: [Q-LIST] Re: FW: Rudders big and small




Hi Kevin,

I'm in a similar preparation phase for the arrival of my Quickie. Even
though I don't expect it to be flying for 12 months I decided that it
was time to do some more flying again. Previous experience was 20
hours in a Warrior, which is like driving a bus, and that was 18 years
ago anyhow.

So last week I headed 200km off to a small aerodrome in Yarram,
Victoria for some ultralight lessons. Before going the CFI asked me by
email what I thought I'd need to get an UL license and I brashly said
"Oh, about 3 hrs dual and 5-7 solo". Hah!! What I didn't realize I
could write a book about, and that statement sure looks stupid now.

Yarram airfield is between the coast and a small mountain range, and
it's almost summer. The only time you can fly as a student is two
hours in the morning and evenings, the rest of the time there's so
much thermal activity it just gets too bumpy. But there's also the
onshore breezes and adiabatic winds to contend with, and most takeoffs
were into a 10-15 kt crosswind.

So although I managed to fly the area fairly well after a couple of
hours, I could never manage a landing without the instructor having to
help out, and the takeoffs weren't all that straight either. So I
would highly recommend some time in a Thruster or similar two-seater
taildragger ultralight as damned good experience prior to taking to
the skies in a Q.

This is also the first time I've found an airport that even vaguely
approximates the kind of grassroots ambiance seen in the USA. My
previous school in Lilydale was all business and filled with youngish
instructors who were just on a stepping-stone to a better commercial
job. You could hang around all day and learn nothing at all. Yarram
was full of relatively old guys - and I'm 51 so speaking in the
absolute sense they were ancient - who had mostly built their own
airplanes and knew every bolt, and who were keen to talk about them.

The barbeque on Sunday brought out a Jodel, several Jabirus, a
beautiful new Kara One, an ancient Zenair and even an autogyro. During
the week I got a ride in a Lightwing, and saw several other
interesting craft from a single-seat Jeep to an Airvan and a Seneca
II. Yarram is also a stepping-stone to Tasmania, and a very schmick
C-150 driven by an American couple refuelled midweek on route
Launceston to visit their daughters. The place was literally hopping
with fanatical fliers. Needless to say, I joined the local club and
will be going back again regularly.

I got home last night humbled, sunburnt and with an 88% pass in the
BAK on my logbook. It was a great week, now all I need is to do some
more flying.

Rob


--- In Q-LIST@..., "Kevin Fortin" <kfortin@p...> wrote:


Hey guys,



Even with the Pitts big rudder, it is still one twitchy bird.



After going thru 10 dual hours of armpit sweating stress in the
Pitts,
WITH DUAL HELP, I finally got to solo it. I can't imagine trying to
learn to fly it by myself, which is what you guy have had (or
will have)
to do. If I had to learn to fly the Pitts by myself, I am pretty
sure at
some point I would blame the airplane and want to start changing it.
This sounds a bit like what some of you are thinking.



In that 10 hours, 80% of what I learned was how to dance the
dance on
the rudder pedals. Nothing more. (When I started on the Pitts I
had 40
or so hours in a Decathlon).



My thought (and I reserve the right to change it) is, it's most
likely
learning to dance the dance on the rudder pedals, not the size
of the
rudder.



If the Q is anything like the Pitts, the steepness of the
learning curve
is unexpected, to say the least. I admire anyone who can make it
through
that on their own.



BTW: I still plan to taxi, taxi, and taxi some more.



Kevin Fortin

sales@p...


















Quickie Builders Association WEB site
http://www.quickiebuilders.org


Yahoo! Groups Links











Quickie Builders Association WEB site
http://www.quickiebuilders.org


Yahoo! Groups Links







haiqu
 

Arthur,

So far you have accused me of being a tire-kicker, called my Quickie a
lemon and are now becoming defensive about my fairly innocuous comment
as regards your Q2 kit. This is going beyond sour grapes at my
non-purchase and entering the surreal.

I made a decision based on my financial abilities, space available and
the amount of time and effort needed to get an airplane flying,
nothing more. You don't have to justify anything to me. I'm sure that
someone with the required time and money could build it, I just took
an easier path. In the long run I'll want a two-seater, but right now
I need something I can fly fairly soon.

Your continuing dire warnings about ZK-JGZ are entirely without
foundation, you don't know the aircraft. Please get a grip.

Rob


--- In Q-LIST@..., "Arthur & Margaret" <warreen@n...> wrote:
Well I am glad to see that you have final seen the light, as to the
shambling pile of Q2 parts, after your remarks on Q-list I had them
checked
out by CASA inspector who deals in composites and in his words THIS IS A
VERY GOOD STARTERS KIT. My kit was imported from Seattle in the USA from
David Hiatt who has built his own Q2 and writes on Q-list from time
to time
so you are bring his good name into question when you make remarks like
that. I would be v
ery careful in rebuilding the aircraft you have purchased and all work
should be cover by TC if you consider your Safety . Arthur
----- Original Message -----
From: "HAIQU_OZ" <judd@o...>
To: <Q-LIST@...>
Sent: Thursday, December 02, 2004 1:34 AM
Subject: [Q-LIST] Re: FW: Rudders big and small




Arthur,

I said nothing of the sort, either by email or in person, to you or
anyone else. I am perfectly aware of the amount of work involved in
getting this plane flying again.

And it will still cost me a total of around $2000 less - and about 4
years less work - than the shambling pile of Q2 parts you offered me,
even including shipping it here and building the engine. I'm satisfied
with the deal.

Rob


--- In Q-LIST@..., "Arthur & Margaret" <warreen@n...>
wrote:
Rob, you told me that you would have fixed up the problems in 4 to 5
hours
and have it flying which is it, I think you have a lot to learn
maybe you
have brought a lemon.
----- Original Message -----
From: "HAIQU_OZ" <judd@o...>
To: <Q-LIST@...>
Sent: Tuesday, November 30, 2004 11:34 AM
Subject: [Q-LIST] Re: FW: Rudders big and small




Hi Kevin,

I'm in a similar preparation phase for the arrival of my
Quickie. Even
though I don't expect it to be flying for 12 months I decided
that it
was time to do some more flying again. Previous experience was 20
hours in a Warrior, which is like driving a bus, and that was
18 years
ago anyhow.

So last week I headed 200km off to a small aerodrome in Yarram,
Victoria for some ultralight lessons. Before going the CFI
asked me by
email what I thought I'd need to get an UL license and I
brashly said
"Oh, about 3 hrs dual and 5-7 solo". Hah!! What I didn't realize I
could write a book about, and that statement sure looks stupid
now.

Yarram airfield is between the coast and a small mountain
range, and
it's almost summer. The only time you can fly as a student is two
hours in the morning and evenings, the rest of the time there's so
much thermal activity it just gets too bumpy. But there's also the
onshore breezes and adiabatic winds to contend with, and most
takeoffs
were into a 10-15 kt crosswind.

So although I managed to fly the area fairly well after a
couple of
hours, I could never manage a landing without the instructor
having to
help out, and the takeoffs weren't all that straight either. So I
would highly recommend some time in a Thruster or similar
two-seater
taildragger ultralight as damned good experience prior to
taking to
the skies in a Q.

This is also the first time I've found an airport that even
vaguely
approximates the kind of grassroots ambiance seen in the USA. My
previous school in Lilydale was all business and filled with
youngish
instructors who were just on a stepping-stone to a better
commercial
job. You could hang around all day and learn nothing at all.
Yarram
was full of relatively old guys - and I'm 51 so speaking in the
absolute sense they were ancient - who had mostly built their own
airplanes and knew every bolt, and who were keen to talk about
them.

The barbeque on Sunday brought out a Jodel, several Jabirus, a
beautiful new Kara One, an ancient Zenair and even an
autogyro. During
the week I got a ride in a Lightwing, and saw several other
interesting craft from a single-seat Jeep to an Airvan and a
Seneca
II. Yarram is also a stepping-stone to Tasmania, and a very
schmick
C-150 driven by an American couple refuelled midweek on route
Launceston to visit their daughters. The place was literally
hopping
with fanatical fliers. Needless to say, I joined the local
club and
will be going back again regularly.

I got home last night humbled, sunburnt and with an 88% pass
in the
BAK on my logbook. It was a great week, now all I need is to
do some
more flying.

Rob


--- In Q-LIST@..., "Kevin Fortin" <kfortin@p...>
wrote:


Hey guys,



Even with the Pitts big rudder, it is still one twitchy bird.



After going thru 10 dual hours of armpit sweating stress in the
Pitts,
WITH DUAL HELP, I finally got to solo it. I can't imagine
trying to
learn to fly it by myself, which is what you guy have had (or
will have)
to do. If I had to learn to fly the Pitts by myself, I am pretty
sure at
some point I would blame the airplane and want to start
changing it.
This sounds a bit like what some of you are thinking.



In that 10 hours, 80% of what I learned was how to dance the
dance on
the rudder pedals. Nothing more. (When I started on the Pitts I
had 40
or so hours in a Decathlon).



My thought (and I reserve the right to change it) is, it's most
likely
learning to dance the dance on the rudder pedals, not the size
of the
rudder.



If the Q is anything like the Pitts, the steepness of the
learning curve
is unexpected, to say the least. I admire anyone who can make it
through
that on their own.



BTW: I still plan to taxi, taxi, and taxi some more.



Kevin Fortin

sales@p...


















Quickie Builders Association WEB site
http://www.quickiebuilders.org


Yahoo! Groups Links











Quickie Builders Association WEB site
http://www.quickiebuilders.org


Yahoo! Groups Links