Original Builder Poll


Jim Patillo
 

Fella's,

I'm taking a general poll to find out how many original
builder/flyers we have amongst us. If you bought your kit from QAC
and are finishing, or have flown please let us know who you are. I
think you'll see something interesting here.

Please note how many hours you've flown your plane, serial #, what
engine you use or any that you've tried, any major structural,
engine or other problems over the years.

I'll go first:

Jim Patillo
Aircraft: Q200 N45JP Q200 - 650 hours
Serial Number:#2468 - Kit purchased October 1980
Engine: Continental - pumped up & dual electronic ignitions

This airplane has never suffered any deviation from the runway and
is totally controllable though all ranges of ground taxi and flight.

The engine has had three failures; The first - fuel starvation 100'
off the runway which was a vapor lock (throw those gascolators
away!). The second was also fuel starvation about 100' off the
runway where I had mistakenly taken off while pumping a full aux
tank into a full header/main tank. The other was a push rod seal
failure which lost all the oil and almost created a forced landing.

This airplane suffered what appeared to be the only documented
canard failure to date due to a poor testing process at the factory.

Other than that N46JP Q200 has been a pleasure to fly.

Regards,

JIm Patillo N46JP Q200


Bob Farnam <bfarnam@...>
 

Here's mine.

Bob Farnam
Aircraft: Q200 N200QK - 470 hours
Serial number 2351 - Purchased in 1981, first flight in May 1998
Engine: Continental O200A - stock engine with 700 hours SMOH
Based at Livermore, CA

The engine had an exhaust valve leak (low compression) which surfaced at
about 120 hours. Valve grind done on that cylinder. It has been fine since.
Erratic oil pressures during original flight test at about 20 hours traced
to sticky oil pressure relief valve. No other problems other than some oil
leaks.
Like Jim's, this airplane is completely controllable on the runway. It was
the development airplane for the "six-pack". The fuel system is totally Q200
stock
(no gascolator) and has never had a problem. I added an aux. fuel tank 5
years ago which has also been trouble free. It gives me 4 hrs 20 minutes to
dry tanks.
This airplane is tested to 1300 lbs gross and I routinely fly it at 1250
lbs. This airplane has been to OSH twice, Ottawa twice, and all over the
western states.
Also like Jim's, a pleasure to fly.
Bob F.
N200QK
EAA Flight Advisor

-----Original Message-----
From: Q-LIST@... [mailto:Q-LIST@...]On Behalf Of
Jim Patillo
Sent: Wednesday, September 14, 2005 10:03 AM
To: Q-LIST@...
Subject: [Q-LIST] Original Builder Poll



Fella's,

I'm taking a general poll to find out how many original
builder/flyers we have amongst us. If you bought your kit from QAC
and are finishing, or have flown please let us know who you are. I
think you'll see something interesting here.

Please note how many hours you've flown your plane, serial #, what
engine you use or any that you've tried, any major structural,
engine or other problems over the years.

I'll go first:

Jim Patillo
Aircraft: Q200 N45JP Q200 - 650 hours
Serial Number:#2468 - Kit purchased October 1980
Engine: Continental - pumped up & dual electronic ignitions

This airplane has never suffered any deviation from the runway and
is totally controllable though all ranges of ground taxi and flight.

The engine has had three failures; The first - fuel starvation 100'
off the runway which was a vapor lock (throw those gascolators
away!). The second was also fuel starvation about 100' off the
runway where I had mistakenly taken off while pumping a full aux
tank into a full header/main tank. The other was a push rod seal
failure which lost all the oil and almost created a forced landing.

This airplane suffered what appeared to be the only documented
canard failure to date due to a poor testing process at the factory.

Other than that N46JP Q200 has been a pleasure to fly.

Regards,

JIm Patillo N46JP Q200





Quickie Builders Association WEB site
http://www.quickiebuilders.org





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n17pf <FisherPaul@...>
 

Builder/Owner: Paul A. Fisher
Aircraft: Q-200 N17PF 1200 hours
Original Kit purchased 22Apr1983; first flight 13Aug1990 (sorry, I
don't remember the serial number from QAC)
Engine: Continental O-200 - stock
Based at Davenport Iowa (KDVN)

In 15 years of flying this plane I have had my share
of "experiences". It is on its second engine (purchased the second
from Q200 driver Art Jewett before his death). Originally I was
going to pump up the original engine (it was reaching TBO) like
Patillo, but instead I sold it as part of my transition to the dark
side of the force. :-)

I've replaced the alternator on the accessory case for a belt driven
model, the vacuum pump has given up twice, I've replaced Mags twice
(or was it three times?!?). It still leaks some oil. I replaced the
oil filter with a cooler because I couldn't keep the temps in range
(too lazy to build a plenum!). It had a stuck valve once in
Albuquerque, and I've had two episodes of "vapor lock" that I
attribute to the header tank being too full.

The plane has been to Oshkosh 14 times (it's only 1.5 hours away!);
Tucson AZ; Edwards AFB California; Sun 'n Fun three or four times
including one excursion to the Bahamas. Also I believe it is the
only plane to attend every single Ottawa/Burlington/Sullivan fly-in
ever held (at least so far!).

The airframe is pretty stock. The only exceptions I can think of
are the reflexor (as described in one of the past Qtalks);
differential hand brakes replacing the single control in the plans;
and the LaRue brake mounts (also described in Qtalk). I haven't
done the Gall wheel alignment yet, but I still intend to. I have
too much fun flying it to get that done!

I have not built an auxillary fuel tank. The plane has a fuel range
of about three hours and 45 minutes. The pilot has a bladder range
of about three hours, so the aux tank didn't seem necessary! ;-)

As Bob and Jim have both said it is a pleasure to fly.

I hope to see you all in Sullivan in a couple of weeks!

- Paul


--- In Q-LIST@..., "Jim Patillo"
<logistics_engineering@m...> wrote:

Fella's,

I'm taking a general poll to find out how many original
builder/flyers we have amongst us. If you bought your kit from QAC
and are finishing, or have flown please let us know who you are. I
think you'll see something interesting here.

Please note how many hours you've flown your plane, serial #, what
engine you use or any that you've tried, any major structural,
engine or other problems over the years.

I'll go first:

Jim Patillo
Aircraft: Q200 N45JP Q200 - 650 hours
Serial Number:#2468 - Kit purchased October 1980
Engine: Continental - pumped up & dual electronic ignitions

This airplane has never suffered any deviation from the runway and
is totally controllable though all ranges of ground taxi and
flight.

The engine has had three failures; The first - fuel starvation
100'
off the runway which was a vapor lock (throw those gascolators
away!). The second was also fuel starvation about 100' off the
runway where I had mistakenly taken off while pumping a full aux
tank into a full header/main tank. The other was a push rod seal
failure which lost all the oil and almost created a forced
landing.

This airplane suffered what appeared to be the only documented
canard failure to date due to a poor testing process at the
factory.

Other than that N46JP Q200 has been a pleasure to fly.

Regards,

JIm Patillo N46JP Q200


L Koutz <koutzl@...>
 

Larry Koutz Valdosta, Ga. Q-200 S/N 2577 N39LK 559 Hours Signed off in March 1990. Lots of modifications to plane some worked and some didn't. Fun to fly, inexpensive airplane. Not a great hands off X/C plane but it is so comfortable to fly in that unless you have to take your hands off the stick you hardly notice. I am putting a Corvair engine on the plane and am about 50% done but only about 2 weeks real work to do to get it to run. The O-200 was a good engine but I had a lot of "situations" with engine and I had low oil pressure in 2003. So not wanting to tear down the engine I went for the Corvair. In hindsight it would have been easier and, if there were no major problems in the bottom end of the engine, cheaper to rebuild it. I think, talking to other people, that the low oil pressure was just a leaking oil pressure regulator valve as the engine ran strong. The engine is up for sale as I can't go back now!


Sam Kittle
 

Aircraft: Q200
Serial Number:#2671 - Kit purchased March 1982 from Nor Cal Quickie
Engine: Continental - ECI cylinders & Claus Savier pistons, ignition yet to be determined.

Cleveland wheels and brakes, pressure recovery style wheel pants, tail
wheel mod, Patillo style header tank, Earnest Martin cowling.
Still trying to get her done.

Sam Kittle



Greg Z.
 

Greg Zimmeman
Tri Q 200 89RZ purchased in 1980 First flight 1989
Engine 0-200 Approx 900 hrs, built per plans. No gascalator. No problems


MartinErni@...
 

Earnest Martin
Aircraft: TRIQ200 N479E - 900+ hours
Serial Number 2080 - purchased in 1982 from Wilkesboro NC Dealer - first
flight 1988
Engine O200A - 9.4 Klaus pistons, new Continental cylinders, belt driven 40
amp alternator, B&C starter, dual Rose electronic ignitions.
Other Mod's: MT constant speed propeller, Mac servo on reflexor, turnbuckle
roll trim, dual batteries and buses, aux. tank, electric gyros, boost pump.

Broke the first nose gear after 6 hrs of out of control landings. I had just
passed my private check ride and believed all the QAC propaganda. It then
sat for 2 years but I eventually got it back out and made the repairs. Then went
to Ottawa and got some time in Bob Malechek's plane, came back, and had no
further problems handling the plane.

Had another nose gear fail about 500 hours later from metal fatigue. The
gear leg was too flexible and the plane always porpoised on roll out which
eventually caused the fatigue. The new gear is much stiffer and seems plenty
strong.

You would really have to work at it to get the Triq to depart the runway.
Even with the nose gear fork broken completely off it tracks straight down the
center line. But it will make you prop a little shorter. Keep your prop as
long as long as you can. :-)

I had one incident when the engine would only run at less than full power
settings. It was cause by the fuel vent being placed in a low pressure area
behind the cowl exit. My first case of having the fuel vent blocked by fuel
didn't happen until 900 hours when I took off immediately after completely filing
the tanks.

My only engine problem which was early on was a stuck valve that cased the
rocker arm boss to break on my old rechromed cylinders. It would still climb
on three, so, I had no problem getting home. I have been using TCP and MM oil
ever since and have not had another stuck valve.

I did land once because of low oil pressure that was cause by a small piece
of rubber stuck under the oil pressure relief valve.

I have no gascolator and routinely fly at 1250 pounds gross.


Paul Spackman
 

Paul Spackman

Q-2 Converted to Q-2 Jabiru 3300 N131PS
450 hours Total 190 Revmaster, 260 Jabiru Power
Engine Jabiru 3300 stock
Prop 54 X 72 Sensenich
Serial Number 2520 November 1981
Two other builders completed a total of 20%

First flight July 4, 1997

Revmaster powered this aircraft had more than its share of misery.
Tried venting the header on the belly but it didn't work with the
Posa carb. The vent was moved to the top of the fuselage and has
worked well since. The Revmaster cracked a head at 75 hours due to
poor quality heads supplied with the Revmaster. New heads were built
to order and the Revmaster was flown for another 115 hours. I never
was comfortable behind the heavy Revmaster.

The Jabiru was installed and a new cowling built. The engine had a
piece of gunk under one valve and was covered under warranty at about
25 hours. The same cylinder had a leaking valve at about 100 hours
caused by leaking exhaust manifold due to improper installation when
the dealer re-installed the head.

No engine failures in-flight with either engine.

Standard Q taildragger setup and is also totally controllable at all
speeds on the ground. Gall wheel alignment was completed with no
noticeable change in handling. This plane only leaves the runway when
I ask it to.

I am still flying the GU canard with vortex generators.

Fun to fly and yep, it's a taildragger.

Paul Spackman


Sam Hoskins <shoskins@...>
 

Sam Hoskins

Aircraft: Q-200 N202SH, getting close to 1,500 hours.

Serial number #2614 first part of kit purchased from QAC dealer H.A.W.K
(associated with the Micro Mesh company in Iowa) the day John Belushi died,
March 5, 1982. I think the total cost of the QAC kits was about $10,000,
way back when.

First Flight June 9, 1984; time to build, four years, two months and two
days. Next year, I hope to get my "Flying 20 Years" prop tag at Oshkosh.
Flown into Oshkosh convention 17 times.

Engine: Continental O-200 Lycon 9:1 pistons, LSE ignition one mag. Plenum
baffling, no oil cooler.

Prop: Catto composite 60x70

Features: Taildragger, gascolator intact, 6.5 gallon header tank, 16.5
gallon main tank and 9.5 gallon removable aux tank. Q-Talk reflexor, roll
trim, factory speed brake, differential braking (installed after second
incident, see below), Gall alignment, Coughlin brake mounts (an improvement
over the LaRue brakes, which were an improvement over the stock brakes).
Electrical system per Bob Knuckolls AeroElectric Connection.

I feel most comfortable on runways 4,000 feet or longer, but have been on
2,500 foot runways a few times.

Lots of learning along the way, much of which is documented on my web site
and web log.

Couple of incidents, too dumb to know when to quit.

Flipped upside down on 15th flight. Rudder pedals tore loose on touchdown,
no directional control. 10 months to repair. Built new wing, replaced
canopy, repaired tail cone, cowling, replaced prop & spinner.

Several years later, scared myself when factory filler cap cracked, engine
didn't want to run, just after liftoff, but was able to crawl to 400 feet
and limp back to runway.

2nd major incident 1,100 hours later; broke a tail spring, went off the
runway (again no directional control) wheel pant broke off. Took out prop,
cracked crankshaft.

Used to have problems with stuck valves (on ground), but none since last
engine overhaul and high compression pistons installed.

Claim to Fame: Flew coast-to-coast in one day.

Have given around 200 passenger rides. I use it a lot for personal
transportation. Flown 5 air races, won one, placed in some others. It's
inexpensive to operate and very fun.

Personal curse; constantly modifying it, can't leave well enough alone. See
website and web log.

http://home.mchsi.com/~shoskins/index.htm

http://samhoskins.blogspot.com/

Best Wishes,

Sam Hoskins

_____

From: Q-LIST@... [mailto:Q-LIST@...] On Behalf Of
Jim Patillo
Sent: Wednesday, September 14, 2005 12:03 PM
To: Q-LIST@...
Subject: [Q-LIST] Original Builder Poll




Fella's,

I'm taking a general poll to find out how many original
builder/flyers we have amongst us. If you bought your kit from QAC
and are finishing, or have flown please let us know who you are. I
think you'll see something interesting here.

Please note how many hours you've flown your plane, serial #, what
engine you use or any that you've tried, any major structural,
engine or other problems over the years.

I'll go first:

Jim Patillo
Aircraft: Q200 N45JP Q200 - 650 hours
Serial Number:#2468 - Kit purchased October 1980
Engine: Continental - pumped up & dual electronic ignitions

This airplane has never suffered any deviation from the runway and
is totally controllable though all ranges of ground taxi and flight.

The engine has had three failures; The first - fuel starvation 100'
off the runway which was a vapor lock (throw those gascolators
away!). The second was also fuel starvation about 100' off the
runway where I had mistakenly taken off while pumping a full aux
tank into a full header/main tank. The other was a push rod seal
failure which lost all the oil and almost created a forced landing.

This airplane suffered what appeared to be the only documented
canard failure to date due to a poor testing process at the factory.

Other than that N46JP Q200 has been a pleasure to fly.

Regards,

JIm Patillo N46JP Q200





Quickie Builders Association WEB site
http://www.quickiebuilders.org






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Dave Dugas
 

Dave Dugas-N68DD

Purchased kit #2476 from Bob MacFarland in 1982.
Began construction November 1, 1982; First flight was in April 2000.
Engine is a Revmaster with a RevFlow carb. Canard is an LS1.
It is a taildragger with original tailwheel. Hydraulic brakes, single handle brake.
Totally built according to the plans, no mods other than a forward hinged canopy.
Based at Orange Municipal Airport (ORE), Orange Massachusetts
Total Time is 420 hours.

I saw a picture of the Quickie on a magazine cover and read the article to find out more information on what I thought was the neatest airplane I'd ever seen. Easy to build (500 hours), easy to fly (new pilots won't have any trouble adjusting to a Q2). Bob MacFarland, a Quickie dealer and builder, was the person I contacted for info on the Q2. He told me that there was a builder located about 20 miles from me, so my wife and I went to see the plane. He was in the finishing stages of construction, and we were quite impressed. I ordered one within a few days. It was the whole kit, engine included, and it had the GU canard. Cost for everything was around $10,000.
During construction the LS1 canard was introduced and I purchased the spars and plans from QAC. The first 1500 hours of construction was actually fun. During this time I was able to get a ride in MacFarlands Q2, because he came up to our fly-in to put on a Q2 building presentation. That was the only time that I got a ride in a Q, and he let me fly and land it twice. This was in 1983. Shortly thereafter the builder near me completed his Q2, and destroyed it on his first flight, too slow on final and mushing in into a ravine just short of the runway. The plane was demolished, but he escaped with a broken ankle. I never forgot the lesson I learned from his error. A couple of years later Bob MacFarland flipped his Q2 over because he'd devised a way to hold the brake on during flight, due to the wheels spinning at cruise speed. He forgot to release the brake on a landing, and when he flipped over he broke the main wing just outboard of the fuselage on the right side of the
plane. Instead of building an entire new wing, he decided to repair the damaged one by cutting out and replacing the crushed foam, and glassing the area, overlapping layers etc. etc. He was killed on his way to Sun & Fun the next year when his repair failed in some turbulance. He also had a passenger who was killed. I was getting uncomfortable hearing these things and progress started to slow down a bit in the construction of N68DD. QAC also went out of business during this time, and motivation was provided by the Quick-Talk news letter that I looked forward to getting every 2 months. Internet wasn't available, and in my opinion it would have been at least an equal factor for reducing the long streches of idle time.
I'd built a hangar with a partner at Orange Airport, and in 1992 I trailered the Q2 to the hangar to try and finish it there. It was unheated and so most of the progress was made during the warmer months. I had it painted by a local body shop, and it was finished after it was painted. All of the components (instrument panel, engine, cowling, wheels and brakes,etc.) were fitted prior to paint. The final inspection was done by a DAR for $350.00, no advice or criticism given, he just took a few pictures and filled out some paperwork. I ran the engine at full throttle, idle, and the full range of power, prior to at least 10 hours of taxiing. The take-off was on Palm Sunday 2000, and it was wild. When I calmed down I climbed to about 3000 feet agl and went through the list of chores that I'd written up. I wanted to fly as long as possible on that first flight, just in case it was the last flight. The first landing was OK and I was ready to celebrate. Other than the
tailspring, and the heads needing to be replaced, it has been a fairly trouble free, and very rewarding experience.
The Revmaster has had new heads installed, and I'm on the third tailspring. I have tailsping material available at no charge other than shipping. I'm confident in the tailspring construction because of the structural fiberglass rod that I was able to find. It is the most fun airplane that I can imagine flying, and if I don't fly it another minute, it's been worth every bit of 17 plus years of construction. It has won best of show at Ottawa Field of Dreams fly-in, and in 2004 it won a Bronze Lindy at Oshkosh.

Dave Dugas N68DD


Jim Patillo <logistics_engineering@...> wrote:

Fella's,

I'm taking a general poll to find out how many original
builder/flyers we have amongst us. If you bought your kit from QAC
and are finishing, or have flown please let us know who you are. I
think you'll see something interesting here.

Please note how many hours you've flown your plane, serial #, what
engine you use or any that you've tried, any major structural,
engine or other problems over the years.

I'll go first:

Jim Patillo
Aircraft: Q200 N45JP Q200 - 650 hours
Serial Number:#2468 - Kit purchased October 1980
Engine: Continental - pumped up & dual electronic ignitions

This airplane has never suffered any deviation from the runway and
is totally controllable though all ranges of ground taxi and flight.

The engine has had three failures; The first - fuel starvation 100'
off the runway which was a vapor lock (throw those gascolators
away!). The second was also fuel starvation about 100' off the
runway where I had mistakenly taken off while pumping a full aux
tank into a full header/main tank. The other was a push rod seal
failure which lost all the oil and almost created a forced landing.

This airplane suffered what appeared to be the only documented
canard failure to date due to a poor testing process at the factory.

Other than that N46JP Q200 has been a pleasure to fly.

Regards,

JIm Patillo N46JP Q200





Quickie Builders Association WEB site
http://www.quickiebuilders.org





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JAY SCHEEVEL <scheevel@...>
 

Hi Jim,

Here's another story for your book:

I purchased my Q2 kit SN2868 from QAC in September 1984. I began construction on October 27, 1985. Late in 1985, I purchased the Q-200 conversion. That same year I purchased one of Scott Swing's origninal Tri-Q conversion kits. By the end of 1987, I had both wings, ailerons, elevators constructed, and had most of the landing gear installation complete. I have an 0-200 engine for the plane that has been dormant for about 15 years, but I have decided to go with the J3300 engine, using the same installation as Paul Spackman, who is very satisfied with the engine's performance and reliability.

Claim to fame. When I moved to Livermore in late 1987, My construction progress was way ahead of Bob Farnam and Jim Patillo, and nearly even with Barry Weber.

Claim to shame. When I moved out of Livermore in 1996, Barry had more than 200 hours on his Q-200, and Bob and Jim were almost ready to fly. I am still in about the same phase as I was then.

On the plus side, I do now have: 1. a wonderful wife of 15 years, 2. two boys 10 and 12 years old, 3. a home that I designed, built, and own free-and-clear, 4. a well maintained Cherokee 235B, and 5. a successful one-man business...but all those things tend to eat into building time, as many of you know first-hand.

My enthusiasm for my Q remains high. Because of my building delays I am now and continue to be the beneficiary of all of your generous suggestions and experience. Now I am gunning for the longest project in progress award at some fly-in in the future.

Jay Scheevel Tri-Q .....still building


Jim Patillo
 

Jay, Are you going to sell your old antiquated 0200. There may just
be someone lurking who is in need of an engine.

Regards,

JIm Patillo N46JP Q200

--- In Q-LIST@..., "JAY SCHEEVEL" <scheevel@b...> wrote:

Hi Jim,

Here's another story for your book:

I purchased my Q2 kit SN2868 from QAC in September 1984. I began
construction
on October 27, 1985. Late in 1985, I purchased the Q-200
conversion. That same
year I purchased one of Scott Swing's origninal Tri-Q conversion
kits. By the
end of 1987, I had both wings, ailerons, elevators constructed, and
had most
of the landing gear installation complete. I have an 0-200 engine
for the
plane that has been dormant for about 15 years, but I have decided
to go with
the J3300 engine, using the same installation as Paul Spackman, who
is very
satisfied with the engine's performance and reliability.

Claim to fame. When I moved to Livermore in late 1987, My
construction
progress was way ahead of Bob Farnam and Jim Patillo, and nearly
even with
Barry Weber.

Claim to shame. When I moved out of Livermore in 1996, Barry had
more than 200
hours on his Q-200, and Bob and Jim were almost ready to fly. I am
still in
about the same phase as I was then.

On the plus side, I do now have: 1. a wonderful wife of 15 years,
2. two boys
10 and 12 years old, 3. a home that I designed, built, and own free-
and-clear,
4. a well maintained Cherokee 235B, and 5. a successful one-man
business...but
all those things tend to eat into building time, as many of you
know
first-hand.

My enthusiasm for my Q remains high. Because of my building delays
I am now
and continue to be the beneficiary of all of your generous
suggestions and
experience. Now I am gunning for the longest project in progress
award at
some fly-in in the future.

Jay Scheevel Tri-Q .....still building


Mike Dwyer <mdwyer@...>
 

Ok I'll join in also.

Mike Dwyer

Aircraft: Q-200 N3QP (why is everyone getting these long N numbers?) The QP came from my request for 1QP or 2QP. I figured I could say "one quick plane" coming in ... But the Feds gave me 3QP and ruined my fun.

Aprox 1,000 hours.

Serial number #2681 purchased for $9000 with Q200 option from Cleo Crop Care in NC. Dec, 1983. Picked up the box from Yellow freight and put it on the top of my Mustang II for the trip home.

First Flight July, 1985; time to build, 1 year, 6 months. Tried to fly into Oshkosh convention 1 times and they pissed me off. Fly into Lakeland Airshow every year for the past 20 years.

Engine: Stock Continental O-200 One bendix mag, one Electroair ignition. Standard baffling that is getting all cracked up and ugly. Oil cooler with a closing door (mostly closed). Plenum
baffling, no oil cooler.

Prop: Marge Warnkee 58x64?

Features: Taildragger, 5.0 gallon header tank, 18.5 gallon main tank. QAC reflexor, electric roll
trim, QAC plans non-differential braking, Gall alignment, LaRue brakes.

Electrical system per me. Dual buss, huge mess now after 20 years of mods.

Dynon EFIS, Garmin 295 Color moving map and HSI (love em both and I can get you a deal on the Dynon). Got rid of the junk VOR completely.

Operated for 5 years off a 2800' strip. I feel most comfortable on runways 4,000 feet or longer.

Couple of incidents, too dumb to know when to quit: Snapped off an early tail wheel and turned 90 degrees to the runway and stopped. Crinkle on top of rear shell forward of verticle fin. Tire fix caused them to hit inside wheel well on braking. Put it on the nose, broke 4" of one prop blade off (and I loved that old Bernard Warnkee prop too.)

Factory plastic filler cap cracked, engine didn't want to run at full power but ran great at 90% power still giving a 800 fpm climb. Facet fuel pump stopped pumping above 3000 feet, worked ok below that - replaced it.

Claim to Fame: Most trips to the Bahamas of any Q (I'd guess 12?).

Have given a forgotten number of passenger rides (guys log this!). I use the Q for only fun travel or sometimes to put a ham radio in and cause pileups on the radio (if your a ham you know what that means). It's inexpensive to operate and very fun.

Personal curse; constantly modifying it, can't leave well enough alone. See
website and web log.

http://www.geocities.com/fly-home/


Best Wishes,

Mike Dwyer
Tampa Bay Florida