Anti-Seize and WD-40


schmayhoo
 

I had heard that WD-40 contains fish oil. Have also heard that if sprayed
on lures, it attracts fish too.

Jerry Brinkerhuff Q-200 Steadily building

Had enough yet? Don't re-elect anybody. Remember that the last 100 years
of American decline have been brought to you by Democrats and Republicans.
Think third party

In a message dated 3/15/2010 4:53:01 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,
dmperry1012@att.net writes:




Hello:

I was on the road last week, now reading back postings. The discussion
on WD-40 and Anti-Seize compounds caught my eye. I understand WD-40
(and many other petroleum based products) can prevent fiberglass
adhesion. I also know petroleum products can dissolve foam, and many
anti-seize products are petroleum based. Based n those issues, what is
the best product for our purposes? Do we use a different product around
foam (eg: torque tubes) and in front of the firewall (sparkplugs)f

Thanks for any ideas and esp. experience -- Mike Perry






[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


One Sky Dog
 

Mike,
In my humble opinion, no WD-40 on my airplane, oil on linkages sparingly,
do not over grease bearings ( a little dab will do it, more will retain
heat. Dissimilar metal junctions a dab of anti-seize. Metals that gall Al, SS a
dab of anti-seize. No hydrocarbon spray over styro-foam cores even painted
ones. Soap designed for high end cars or airplanes. No Windex or ammonia
products on the canopy.

Bugs, mist with water/one drop soap, wait 2 mins, wipe with micro-fiber
cloths from Costco.

Regards,

Charlie Johnson

Ogden, UT

In a message dated 3/15/2010 3:53:02 P.M. Mountain Daylight Time,
dmperry1012@att.net writes:

Hello:

I was on the road last week, now reading back postings. The discussion
on WD-40 and Anti-Seize compounds caught my eye. I understand WD-40
(and many other petroleum based products) can prevent fiberglass
adhesion. I also know petroleum products can dissolve foam, and many
anti-seize products are petroleum based. Based n those issues, what is
the best product for our purposes? Do we use a different product around
foam (eg: torque tubes) and in front of the firewall (sparkplugs)?

Thanks for any ideas and esp. experience -- Mike Perry


Mike Perry
 

Hello:

I was on the road last week, now reading back postings. The discussion on WD-40 and Anti-Seize compounds caught my eye. I understand WD-40 (and many other petroleum based products) can prevent fiberglass adhesion. I also know petroleum products can dissolve foam, and many anti-seize products are petroleum based. Based n those issues, what is the best product for our purposes? Do we use a different product around foam (eg: torque tubes) and in front of the firewall (sparkplugs)?

Thanks for any ideas and esp. experience -- Mike Perry


Sam Hoskins
 

For a general spray lube I like Teflon based Tri-Flow. You can get it at
some hardware stores.

For years I used gray Anti-seize for my torque tubes and it worked just
fine. Kind of messy, though.

Sam







On Mon, Mar 15, 2010 at 4:45 PM, Mike Perry <dmperry1012@att.net> wrote:



Hello:

I was on the road last week, now reading back postings. The discussion
on WD-40 and Anti-Seize compounds caught my eye. I understand WD-40
(and many other petroleum based products) can prevent fiberglass
adhesion. I also know petroleum products can dissolve foam, and many
anti-seize products are petroleum based. Based n those issues, what is
the best product for our purposes? Do we use a different product around
foam (eg: torque tubes) and in front of the firewall (sparkplugs)?

Thanks for any ideas and esp. experience -- Mike Perry



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Mike Dwyer <mdwyer@...>
 

I used purple hi-grade marine grease on the metal parts, elevators, axels... and that messy carbon black stuff on the spark plugs.
Mike Q200

On 3/15/2010 5:57 PM, Sam Hoskins wrote:
For a general spray lube I like Teflon based Tri-Flow. You can get it at
some hardware stores.

For years I used gray Anti-seize for my torque tubes and it worked just
fine. Kind of messy, though.

Sam







On Mon, Mar 15, 2010 at 4:45 PM, Mike Perry<dmperry1012@att.net> wrote:



Hello:

I was on the road last week, now reading back postings. The discussion
on WD-40 and Anti-Seize compounds caught my eye. I understand WD-40
(and many other petroleum based products) can prevent fiberglass
adhesion. I also know petroleum products can dissolve foam, and many
anti-seize products are petroleum based. Based n those issues, what is
the best product for our purposes? Do we use a different product around
foam (eg: torque tubes) and in front of the firewall (sparkplugs)?

Thanks for any ideas and esp. experience -- Mike Perry






------------------------------------

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http://www.quickiebuilders.org

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Mike Perry
 

Just want to say thanks to Charlie and Company for your comments -- Mike Perry

oneskydog@aol.com wrote:


Mike,
In my humble opinion, no WD-40 on my airplane, oil on linkages sparingly,
do not over grease bearings ( a little dab will do it, more will retain
heat. Dissimilar metal junctions a dab of anti-seize. Metals that gall Al, SS a
dab of anti-seize. No hydrocarbon spray over styro-foam cores even painted
ones. Soap designed for high end cars or airplanes. No Windex or ammonia
products on the canopy.

Bugs, mist with water/one drop soap, wait 2 mins, wipe with micro-fiber
cloths from Costco.

Regards,

Charlie Johnson

Ogden, UT


In a message dated 3/15/2010 3:53:02 P.M. Mountain Daylight Time,
dmperry1012@att.net <mailto:dmperry1012%40att.net> writes:

Hello:

I was on the road last week, now reading back postings. The discussion
on WD-40 and Anti-Seize compounds caught my eye. I understand WD-40
(and many other petroleum based products) can prevent fiberglass
adhesion. I also know petroleum products can dissolve foam, and many
anti-seize products are petroleum based. Based n those issues, what is
the best product for our purposes? Do we use a different product around
foam (eg: torque tubes) and in front of the firewall (sparkplugs)?

Thanks for any ideas and esp. experience -- Mike Perry