Quickie AD notes


Mike Dwyer <mdwyer@...>
 

Hey Guys,
I think we should put together on a web site somewhere a list of AD notes for the rest of the builder/ flyer community.

I'd like to contribute a couple:

Q-AD# 1
Type Q: Q200
TT: 800 hours
The lower rudder phenolic bearing broke loose from the support structure. Inspection of the Rudder hinge pre-flight found the damage.

Q-AD# 2
Type Q: Q200
TT: 900 and 1100 hours
The elevator center hinge was found to have abnormal up and down play during pre-flight inspection. The right side was loose after 900 hours, the left after 1100 hours. The pin inside the elevator was found to be loose. A 4' long socket extension made from a piece of solid 3/8" stock was used to tighten the internal pin. This should be done each time the elevator is removed. Builders may want to use locktight on this assembly.

Q-AD# 3
Type Q: Q200
TT: 900 hours
After sitting on the main gear for 18 years the canard shape changes enough to cause the main wheel alignment to camber out excessively resulting in poor ground control on landing. Either the axle holes need to be re-cut or the wheel pants removed and repositioned to bring the wheels back into alignment.

Mike Q200 N3QP


quickheads2 <groups@...>
 

I'll ADd this to the website. Does anyone else have any?

Perhaps we should create a list for the single seaters as well?

Let me know.

Also just wondering if we should call these suggested mainteneace checks instead of AD's? Will calling them AD's make the FAA get involved? Just curious.

Dan Yager
Q-200 Under Reconstruction
QBA Editor
www.quickheads.com

--- In Q-LIST@yahoogroups.com, Mike Dwyer <mdwyer@...> wrote:

Hey Guys,
I think we should put together on a web site somewhere a list of AD
notes for the rest of the builder/ flyer community.

I'd like to contribute a couple:

Q-AD# 1
Type Q: Q200
TT: 800 hours
The lower rudder phenolic bearing broke loose from the support
structure. Inspection of the Rudder hinge pre-flight found the damage.

Q-AD# 2
Type Q: Q200
TT: 900 and 1100 hours
The elevator center hinge was found to have abnormal up and down play
during pre-flight inspection. The right side was loose after 900 hours,
the left after 1100 hours. The pin inside the elevator was found to be
loose. A 4' long socket extension made from a piece of solid 3/8" stock
was used to tighten the internal pin. This should be done each time the
elevator is removed. Builders may want to use locktight on this assembly.

Q-AD# 3
Type Q: Q200
TT: 900 hours
After sitting on the main gear for 18 years the canard shape changes
enough to cause the main wheel alignment to camber out excessively
resulting in poor ground control on landing. Either the axle holes need
to be re-cut or the wheel pants removed and repositioned to bring the
wheels back into alignment.

Mike Q200 N3QP


Leon
 

I think it would be a good idea to have a comprehensive list in one place for this type of information. While not every plane is the same (each needs it's own custom written inspection list) there are documented failures that could occur in others of type that probably should be collected. Loose and/or broken center elevator pivots is a recent example.

I doubt the term "AD" would be appropriate unless the failures are common. The Jim/Bob 6 Pack probably falls into the category of an AD.

Maybe call them something like KFC's?
Known Failures - Critical .... regular and extra crispy depending on severity :-)

Going back through the early news letters reveals several known failures and hazards, but as far as I know no one has ever taken the time to compile a list. I don't have the time, and I suspect no one else does to make a solo contribution. If there were an existing database that could be added to as time permitted it would be worth the effort - IMHO

Here is a link to a compilation of NTSB reports relating to the Q's. Someone (David Gall?)took the time to at least start on this project.

http://photos.imageevent.com/qdf_files/homebuiltaccidents/List%20of%20Quickie%20Accidents.pdf
=================
Leon - non political - McAtee

--- In Q-LIST@yahoogroups.com, "quickheads2" <groups@...> wrote:

I'll ADd this to the website. Does anyone else have any?

Perhaps we should create a list for the single seaters as well?

Let me know.

Also just wondering if we should call these suggested mainteneace checks instead of AD's? Will calling them AD's make the FAA get involved? Just curious.

Dan Yager
Q-200 Under Reconstruction
QBA Editor
www.quickheads.com


--- In Q-LIST@yahoogroups.com, Mike Dwyer <mdwyer@> wrote:

Hey Guys,
I think we should put together on a web site somewhere a list of AD
notes for the rest of the builder/ flyer community.

I'd like to contribute a couple:

Q-AD# 1
Type Q: Q200
TT: 800 hours
The lower rudder phenolic bearing broke loose from the support
structure. Inspection of the Rudder hinge pre-flight found the damage.

Q-AD# 2
Type Q: Q200
TT: 900 and 1100 hours
The elevator center hinge was found to have abnormal up and down play
during pre-flight inspection. The right side was loose after 900 hours,
the left after 1100 hours. The pin inside the elevator was found to be
loose. A 4' long socket extension made from a piece of solid 3/8" stock
was used to tighten the internal pin. This should be done each time the
elevator is removed. Builders may want to use locktight on this assembly.

Q-AD# 3
Type Q: Q200
TT: 900 hours
After sitting on the main gear for 18 years the canard shape changes
enough to cause the main wheel alignment to camber out excessively
resulting in poor ground control on landing. Either the axle holes need
to be re-cut or the wheel pants removed and repositioned to bring the
wheels back into alignment.

Mike Q200 N3QP


Rick Hole
 

Calling them ADs is not a good idea because AD is a legal document and
procedure which is not available to us. We should call them something
different. For example, in the Light Sport industry, service bulletins are
issued by the manufacturer because only the FAA can issue an AD.

Lets avoid the confusion as AD carries a legal requirement connotation.
Even service bulletin carries a predefined meaning, but I think we could use
that term since the manufacturer no longer exists.

Rick


quickheads2 <groups@...>
 

How about "QBAD" as in directive from the Quickie Builders Association. I'm thinking this would make it more of a list of community suggestions. Of course, you as manufacturer/owner would be responsible for your own plane (and any consequences of following or not following the suggestions.)

Just a thought. :-)

-Dan Yager
QBA Editor
www.quickheads.com

--- In Q-LIST@yahoogroups.com, "Rick Hole" <r.hole@...> wrote:



Calling them ADs is not a good idea because AD is a legal document and
procedure which is not available to us. We should call them something
different. For example, in the Light Sport industry, service bulletins are
issued by the manufacturer because only the FAA can issue an AD.

Lets avoid the confusion as AD carries a legal requirement connotation.
Even service bulletin carries a predefined meaning, but I think we could use
that term since the manufacturer no longer exists.

Rick









Mike Dwyer <mdwyer@...>
 

I like that!
Mike



quickheads2 wrote:

How about "QBAD" as in directive from the Quickie Builders Association. I'm thinking this would make it more of a list of community suggestions. Of course, you as manufacturer/owner would be responsible for your own plane (and any consequences of following or not following the suggestions.)

Just a thought. :-)

-Dan Yager
QBA Editor
www.quickheads.com








--- In Q-LIST@yahoogroups.com, "Rick Hole" <r.hole@...> wrote:


Calling them ADs is not a good idea because AD is a legal document and
procedure which is not available to us. We should call them something
different. For example, in the Light Sport industry, service bulletins are
issued by the manufacturer because only the FAA can issue an AD.
Lets avoid the confusion as AD carries a legal requirement connotation.
Even service bulletin carries a predefined meaning, but I think we could use
that term since the manufacturer no longer exists.

Rick









------------------------------------

Quickie Builders Association WEB site
http://www.quickiebuilders.org

Yahoo! Groups Links





schmayhoo
 

Wasn't there an incident where an elevator torque tube failed? The cutout
for the center pin was larger than needed and the bending stress caused
the tube to break resulting in elevator leaving the aircraft in flight ending
in a fatal crash? I would think that a good visual inspection at annual
for cracks in the tube would be in order.

Secondly, what fuel filter are you Q200 fliers using? I know that the
little glass job is taboo but is there a commonly used one by most? Thanks

Jerry Brinkerhuff Q200 getting closer to this year's flight

In a message dated 4/6/2010 7:40:47 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,
mdwyer@tampabay.rr.com writes:




Hey Guys,
I think we should put together on a web site somewhere a list of AD
notes for the rest of the builder/ flyer community.

I'd like to contribute a couple:

Q-AD# 1
Type Q: Q200
TT: 800 hours
The lower rudder phenolic bearing broke loose from the support
structure. Inspection of the Rudder hinge pre-flight found the damage.

Q-AD# 2
Type Q: Q200
TT: 900 and 1100 hours
The elevator center hinge was found to have abnormal up and down play
during pre-flight inspection. The right side was loose after 900 hours,
the left after 1100 hours. The pin inside the elevator was found to be
loose. A 4' long socket extension made from a piece of solid 3/8" stock
was used to tighten the internal pin. This should be done each time the
elevator is removed. Builders may want to use locktight on this assembly.

Q-AD# 3
Type Q: Q200
TT: 900 hours
After sitting on the main gear for 18 years the canard shape changes
enough to cause the main wheel alignment to camber out excessively
resulting in poor ground control on landing. Either the axle holes need
to be re-cut or the wheel pants removed and repositioned to bring the
wheels back into alignment.

Mike Q200 N3QP


Clive Clapham
 

Hi I'm using the the glass ones, photo uploaded just visible, they are fine so long as they are modified with either a spring or a pin to stop the threaded retainer unwinding and covering the hole.

mine visible so gets check each time the canopy is opened., and can be seen whilst seated.

Gobxoy

--- In Q-LIST@yahoogroups.com, Mike Dwyer <mdwyer@...> wrote:

Hey Guys,
I think we should put together on a web site somewhere a list of AD
notes for the rest of the builder/ flyer community.

I'd like to contribute a couple:

Q-AD# 1
Type Q: Q200
TT: 800 hours
The lower rudder phenolic bearing broke loose from the support
structure. Inspection of the Rudder hinge pre-flight found the damage.

Q-AD# 2
Type Q: Q200
TT: 900 and 1100 hours
The elevator center hinge was found to have abnormal up and down play
during pre-flight inspection. The right side was loose after 900 hours,
the left after 1100 hours. The pin inside the elevator was found to be
loose. A 4' long socket extension made from a piece of solid 3/8" stock
was used to tighten the internal pin. This should be done each time the
elevator is removed. Builders may want to use locktight on this assembly.

Q-AD# 3
Type Q: Q200
TT: 900 hours
After sitting on the main gear for 18 years the canard shape changes
enough to cause the main wheel alignment to camber out excessively
resulting in poor ground control on landing. Either the axle holes need
to be re-cut or the wheel pants removed and repositioned to bring the
wheels back into alignment.

Mike Q200 N3QP


One Sky Dog
 

Jerry,

I used a Fram G-3 plastic body for 500 hours changed annually. It has 30
times the filter area as the little glass hot rod ones. There was always
some junk in it. I know that glass fibers are transparent in gas and will
clog the little ones but look clean. My filter was horizontal and the gas would
run through the bottom of the filter element, the housing would not fill
up so all the element above the fuel level was in reserve if the lower were
to clog. The fuel level would rise in the filter housing.

Besides the glass one cost more and is 30 times more likely to clog based
on area, hmm?

Regards,

One Sky Dog

In a message dated 4/12/2010 9:36:36 A.M. Mountain Daylight Time,
brinkerhuf@aol.com writes:

Secondly, what fuel filter are you Q200 fliers using? I know that the
little glass job is taboo but is there a commonly used one by most?
Thanks

Jerry Brinkerhuff Q200 getting closer to this year's flight


One Sky Dog
 

Why?

Charlie

In a message dated 4/12/2010 3:04:40 P.M. Mountain Daylight Time,
sam.hoskins@gmail.com writes:

I use the little glass job, between my main and header.



Sam


Sam Hoskins
 

I use the little glass job, between my main and header.



Sam



On Mon, Apr 12, 2010 at 10:35 AM, <brinkerhuf@aol.com> wrote:




Wasn't there an incident where an elevator torque tube failed? The cutout
for the center pin was larger than needed and the bending stress caused
the tube to break resulting in elevator leaving the aircraft in flight
ending
in a fatal crash? I would think that a good visual inspection at annual
for cracks in the tube would be in order.

Secondly, what fuel filter are you Q200 fliers using? I know that the
little glass job is taboo but is there a commonly used one by most? Thanks

Jerry Brinkerhuff Q200 getting closer to this year's flight



In a message dated 4/6/2010 7:40:47 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,
mdwyer@tampabay.rr.com <mdwyer%40tampabay.rr.com> writes:

Hey Guys,
I think we should put together on a web site somewhere a list of AD
notes for the rest of the builder/ flyer community.

I'd like to contribute a couple:

Q-AD# 1
Type Q: Q200
TT: 800 hours
The lower rudder phenolic bearing broke loose from the support
structure. Inspection of the Rudder hinge pre-flight found the damage.

Q-AD# 2
Type Q: Q200
TT: 900 and 1100 hours
The elevator center hinge was found to have abnormal up and down play
during pre-flight inspection. The right side was loose after 900 hours,
the left after 1100 hours. The pin inside the elevator was found to be
loose. A 4' long socket extension made from a piece of solid 3/8" stock
was used to tighten the internal pin. This should be done each time the
elevator is removed. Builders may want to use locktight on this assembly.

Q-AD# 3
Type Q: Q200
TT: 900 hours
After sitting on the main gear for 18 years the canard shape changes
enough to cause the main wheel alignment to camber out excessively
resulting in poor ground control on landing. Either the axle holes need
to be re-cut or the wheel pants removed and repositioned to bring the
wheels back into alignment.

Mike Q200 N3QP

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Mike Dwyer <mdwyer@...>
 

Agreed.
QBAD #4 should be to inspect the inside of each elevator torque tube around the center hinge for cracks.

Pre-flight inspection should include checking the lateral and up/down play at each hinge and to the control stick. Mine has a little play but not much.

Fuel Filter..........
I use a water filter from the filler neck to the main tank, then a micron type glass filter from the main tank to the header, then a metal can automotive type from the header to the carb and no screen at the carb. The glass micron filter has worked well for 20 years with replacement a couple of times - never needed replacement. The cheap metal auto filter gets replaced at annual.

Mike Q200 N3QP
Email me for a Q Discount off Dynon Products! mike@warnerair.com
http://www.dynonavionics.com/



brinkerhuf@aol.com wrote:

Wasn't there an incident where an elevator torque tube failed? The cutout for the center pin was larger than needed and the bending stress caused the tube to break resulting in elevator leaving the aircraft in flight ending in a fatal crash? I would think that a good visual inspection at annual for cracks in the tube would be in order.
Secondly, what fuel filter are you Q200 fliers using? I know that the little glass job is taboo but is there a commonly used one by most? Thanks
Jerry Brinkerhuff Q200 getting closer to this year's flight
In a message dated 4/6/2010 7:40:47 P.M. Eastern Standard Time, mdwyer@tampabay.rr.com writes:

Hey Guys,
I think we should put together on a web site somewhere a list of AD notes for the rest of the builder/ flyer community.

I'd like to contribute a couple:

Q-AD# 1
Type Q: Q200
TT: 800 hours
The lower rudder phenolic bearing broke loose from the support structure. Inspection of the Rudder hinge pre-flight found the damage.

Q-AD# 2
Type Q: Q200
TT: 900 and 1100 hours
The elevator center hinge was found to have abnormal up and down play during pre-flight inspection. The right side was loose after 900 hours, the left after 1100 hours. The pin inside the elevator was found to be loose. A 4' long socket extension made from a piece of solid 3/8" stock was used to tighten the internal pin. This should be done each time the elevator is removed. Builders may want to use locktight on this assembly.

Q-AD# 3
Type Q: Q200
TT: 900 hours
After sitting on the main gear for 18 years the canard shape changes enough to cause the main wheel alignment to camber out excessively resulting in poor ground control on landing. Either the axle holes need to be re-cut or the wheel pants removed and repositioned to bring the wheels back into alignment.

Mike Q200 N3QP


Mike Dwyer <mdwyer@...>
 

My original thought on the glass one was it filtered really small particles and if it plugged up I still got my header tank to find a soft landing spot. BUT ... I think I'll replace it with a metal automotive type at the next inspection. I like the metal for toughness. (is that a word?)
Mike Q200 N3QP

oneskydog@aol.com wrote:

Why?
Charlie
In a message dated 4/12/2010 3:04:40 P.M. Mountain Daylight Time, sam.hoskins@gmail.com writes:

I use the little glass job, between my main and header.



Sam