Topics

Jerry come lately

Paul Fisher
 

Great to hear you are all put back together Jerry!  You beat me this year.  I just made my first Q flight of the year today - 10 days into March!  My excuse is not medical, but mechanical. 

My #4 cylinder had developed an exhaust leak that ate away the edge of the exhaust port, so I had to put on a new cylinder.  Kevin Boddicker had a usable cylinder left over, so he gave it to me (thanks Kevin!!).  I finally got everything back together today and flew it for 0.9 hours.  That's the good news.

The bad news is after about 45 minutes in the air at full power circling the airport, the engine "coughed" - like someone had turned the ignition off and back on again.  Only lasted a split second but seriously got my attention.  About a minute later it happened again, and again about 30 seconds after that.  So I called approach and told them I was headed back to land.  I had plenty of altitude and I was only about a mile north of the airport, so it wasn't a huge deal, but I was concerned! 

I landed long and taxied all the way to the end of the runway.  Just as I was turning off the runway the engine quit - prop stopped.  I was afraid I was going to have to push it back to the hangar, but it started right back up and I headed towards the barn.  About halfway back it died again.  Same symptom each time, like someone had turned of the ignition.  One more restart and I taxied uneventfully back to the hangar.  Throttle ups along the way all seemed normal.  Shut down at the hangar was also normal.

At this point, I'm assuming something is grounding the P-leads to the mags.  It didn't seem like a fuel issue (no sputtering, just instantly turned off).  I had enough for one day, so I'm going to sleep on it and then pull things apart and inspect the ignition wiring.  Weird because I didn't touch anything electrical as I replaced the cylinder - the whole job was done with the engine still on the plane.  Is it possible the SARS-CoV2 virus can infect an O-200?!?  I guess I'll have to wait 14 days to find out!

So I'm not ready to fly it to the Spring Fling yet, but it did fly today!

Paul A. Fisher
Q-200 N17PF turns 30 this year with ~1700 hours on it



On Sun, Mar 8, 2020 at 4:18 PM Jerry Marstall <jnmarstall@...> wrote:

I am slow on the trigger, but today I experienced my first flight of the year.  There are legitimate reasons – so I believe.

 

June 19, 2019, I had my left knee replaced.  That grounded me for tooooo long.  I did get a chance to fly twice at the end of October before having my right knee replaced on November 4.  That likewise kept me out of the air until today.  Actually, I could have flown a little earlier, but in between the two knee surgeries I somehow came up with a hernia.  That delayed my flying for another 4 weeks.  Not so much that I couldn’t fly during the hernia recovery, the doctor was concerned about the force required to push the tail down and spin the plane around to then push it uphill out of the hangar.  Guess I should not have described that part to him.

 

Fortunately, Nancy took me for a couple of rides over the last two weeks to familiarize me with the art of flying.  Today was the perfect day.  CAVU and calm.  As in the past, I found that muscle memory carried me through the flying maneuvers, but I really lose familiarity with the cockpit.

I know what I want to look at, but I can’t seem to find it on the instrument panel.  No matter how much broomstick flying I do in the cockpit before a flight after a long layoff, I still have trouble finding the instrument I want to scan.  I know it isn’t old-age because I have always had this problem.  Fortunately, after a few minutes in the air, the instruments seem to relocate themselves to where I remember them being.

 

Anyway, I had my first flight of 2020 and it quickly reminded me of why we love this little airplane so much.  Worth every minute of construction time required to get one completed (if they ever are REALLY completed) and airborne.  For those still building, DON”T STOP.  Doing so will only cause you great lament in the future.

 

Wishing you all a great flying season.  Hope we can all get to Spring Fling and Field of Dreams!!

Jerry Marstall

Asheville, NC

Tri-Q200

900 hrs.

Richard Thomson
 

Thanks Jerry for the encouragement. Glad they are putting you back together gradually :-)

Rich T.

John Hoxie
 

All,
To get back into flying with confidence, I bought a couple Kasperwing ultralights. I didn't realize until I drove 1600 miles to pick them up, that they are going to take some work. I got a corner of a large hangar for them. One cage on floats. A lot of canyons around here to explore and a lake & river my sister has a place onin North Idaho. Been going there nearly every summer my whole life hoping to fly it some day. In the process, I bought an enclosed trailer that my Q2 with engine off will fit into. Kwings fit also. I need to make a dolly to fit the Q2 at the right attitude for the trailer. Note the bent header ram-air tube. Happwned tears ago turning the plane over for first time after installing the tube. Anyone know the easiest way to c


hange it?







On Mon, Mar 9, 2020 at 2:23 PM, Jerry Gmail
<jerrylm1986@...> wrote:
I did. Interviewed 3 people who used it. None of them successful after 3 years. Wound up getting replacements. Another downer, insurance doesn't cover.

On Mon, Mar 9, 2020, 3:38 PM albert jolliffe <ajolliffe50@...> wrote:
You should have looked into stem cell implant .friend of mine had it worked good although it took 9 months to compleat . 


On Mar 8, 2020, at 5:50 PM, Mike Dwyer <q200pilot@...> wrote:

Good report Jerry.  Reminds me that we are getting old!  
Not much from me lately as they are repaving a couple of runways at our airport and it's a terrible mess... So I bought a fixer upper boat!
Never learn!
Mike Dwyer

YouTube Videos: https://goo.gl/yKEHfK
Q200 Website: http://goo.gl/V8IrJF


On Sun, Mar 8, 2020 at 5:18 PM Jerry Marstall <jnmarstall@...> wrote:

I am slow on the trigger, but today I experienced my first flight of the year.  There are legitimate reasons – so I believe.

 

June 19, 2019, I had my left knee replaced.  That grounded me for tooooo long.  I did get a chance to fly twice at the end of October before having my right knee replaced on November 4.  That likewise kept me out of the air until today.  Actually, I could have flown a little earlier, but in between the two knee surgeries I somehow came up with a hernia.  That delayed my flying for another 4 weeks.  Not so much that I couldn’t fly during the hernia recovery, the doctor was concerned about the force required to push the tail down and spin the plane around to then push it uphill out of the hangar.  Guess I should not have described that part to him.

 

Fortunately, Nancy took me for a couple of rides over the last two weeks to familiarize me with the art of flying.  Today was the perfect day.  CAVU and calm.  As in the past, I found that muscle memory carried me through the flying maneuvers, but I really lose familiarity with the cockpit.

I know what I want to look at, but I can’t seem to find it on the instrument panel.  No matter how much broomstick flying I do in the cockpit before a flight after a long layoff, I still have trouble finding the instrument I want to scan.  I know it isn’t old-age because I have always had this problem.  Fortunately, after a few minutes in the air, the instruments seem to relocate themselves to where I remember them being.

 

Anyway, I had my first flight of 2020 and it quickly reminded me of why we love this little airplane so much.  Worth every minute of construction time required to get one completed (if they ever are REALLY completed) and airborne.  For those still building, DON”T STOP.  Doing so will only cause you great lament in the future.

 

Wishing you all a great flying season.  Hope we can all get to Spring Fling and Field of Dreams!!

Jerry Marstall

Asheville, NC

Tri-Q200

900 hrs.

Jerry Gmail
 

I did. Interviewed 3 people who used it. None of them successful after 3 years. Wound up getting replacements. Another downer, insurance doesn't cover.


On Mon, Mar 9, 2020, 3:38 PM albert jolliffe <ajolliffe50@...> wrote:
You should have looked into stem cell implant .friend of mine had it worked good although it took 9 months to compleat . 


On Mar 8, 2020, at 5:50 PM, Mike Dwyer <q200pilot@...> wrote:

Good report Jerry.  Reminds me that we are getting old!  
Not much from me lately as they are repaving a couple of runways at our airport and it's a terrible mess... So I bought a fixer upper boat!
Never learn!
Mike Dwyer

YouTube Videos: https://goo.gl/yKEHfK
Q200 Website: http://goo.gl/V8IrJF


On Sun, Mar 8, 2020 at 5:18 PM Jerry Marstall <jnmarstall@...> wrote:

I am slow on the trigger, but today I experienced my first flight of the year.  There are legitimate reasons – so I believe.

 

June 19, 2019, I had my left knee replaced.  That grounded me for tooooo long.  I did get a chance to fly twice at the end of October before having my right knee replaced on November 4.  That likewise kept me out of the air until today.  Actually, I could have flown a little earlier, but in between the two knee surgeries I somehow came up with a hernia.  That delayed my flying for another 4 weeks.  Not so much that I couldn’t fly during the hernia recovery, the doctor was concerned about the force required to push the tail down and spin the plane around to then push it uphill out of the hangar.  Guess I should not have described that part to him.

 

Fortunately, Nancy took me for a couple of rides over the last two weeks to familiarize me with the art of flying.  Today was the perfect day.  CAVU and calm.  As in the past, I found that muscle memory carried me through the flying maneuvers, but I really lose familiarity with the cockpit.

I know what I want to look at, but I can’t seem to find it on the instrument panel.  No matter how much broomstick flying I do in the cockpit before a flight after a long layoff, I still have trouble finding the instrument I want to scan.  I know it isn’t old-age because I have always had this problem.  Fortunately, after a few minutes in the air, the instruments seem to relocate themselves to where I remember them being.

 

Anyway, I had my first flight of 2020 and it quickly reminded me of why we love this little airplane so much.  Worth every minute of construction time required to get one completed (if they ever are REALLY completed) and airborne.  For those still building, DON”T STOP.  Doing so will only cause you great lament in the future.

 

Wishing you all a great flying season.  Hope we can all get to Spring Fling and Field of Dreams!!

Jerry Marstall

Asheville, NC

Tri-Q200

900 hrs.

albert jolliffe
 

You should have looked into stem cell implant .friend of mine had it worked good although it took 9 months to compleat . 


On Mar 8, 2020, at 5:50 PM, Mike Dwyer <q200pilot@...> wrote:

Good report Jerry.  Reminds me that we are getting old!  
Not much from me lately as they are repaving a couple of runways at our airport and it's a terrible mess... So I bought a fixer upper boat!
Never learn!
Mike Dwyer

YouTube Videos: https://goo.gl/yKEHfK
Q200 Website: http://goo.gl/V8IrJF


On Sun, Mar 8, 2020 at 5:18 PM Jerry Marstall <jnmarstall@...> wrote:

I am slow on the trigger, but today I experienced my first flight of the year.  There are legitimate reasons – so I believe.

 

June 19, 2019, I had my left knee replaced.  That grounded me for tooooo long.  I did get a chance to fly twice at the end of October before having my right knee replaced on November 4.  That likewise kept me out of the air until today.  Actually, I could have flown a little earlier, but in between the two knee surgeries I somehow came up with a hernia.  That delayed my flying for another 4 weeks.  Not so much that I couldn’t fly during the hernia recovery, the doctor was concerned about the force required to push the tail down and spin the plane around to then push it uphill out of the hangar.  Guess I should not have described that part to him.

 

Fortunately, Nancy took me for a couple of rides over the last two weeks to familiarize me with the art of flying.  Today was the perfect day.  CAVU and calm.  As in the past, I found that muscle memory carried me through the flying maneuvers, but I really lose familiarity with the cockpit.

I know what I want to look at, but I can’t seem to find it on the instrument panel.  No matter how much broomstick flying I do in the cockpit before a flight after a long layoff, I still have trouble finding the instrument I want to scan.  I know it isn’t old-age because I have always had this problem.  Fortunately, after a few minutes in the air, the instruments seem to relocate themselves to where I remember them being.

 

Anyway, I had my first flight of 2020 and it quickly reminded me of why we love this little airplane so much.  Worth every minute of construction time required to get one completed (if they ever are REALLY completed) and airborne.  For those still building, DON”T STOP.  Doing so will only cause you great lament in the future.

 

Wishing you all a great flying season.  Hope we can all get to Spring Fling and Field of Dreams!!

Jerry Marstall

Asheville, NC

Tri-Q200

900 hrs.

Jon Matcho
 

Jerry,

 

Thank you for sharing.  I am glad to hear you are healthy and flying again.  Thanks for the motivation.

 

Best regards,

Jon

 

 

Jon Matcho

 

jonmatcho@...

Repairing Quickie TriQ-200

Building a Cozy Mark IV

www.canardzone.com

www.quickheads.com

 

Bruce Crain
 

Great to have you back oh fearless and learned "Potentate"!  I have already flown the TriQ this winter but put it up to tour Fredericksburg and Conroe Texas in the RV6. Went to the Pacific War Museum and the Nimitz museum.  Wonderful displays!  Highly recommended. Tail winds all the way around!  Ground speeds of 190+ all 3 ways!  I am afraid I am getting an attitude from Honey Lamb that says I kinda like this RV thingy.  Mostly luggage.
It is getting warmer here in Oklahoma so I won't have an excuse for not working on the airplanes.  Need to pull a cylinder to check for an oil leak and a few other things.
Bruce Crain


---------- Original Message ----------
From: "Jerry Marstall" <jnmarstall@...>
To: "Q-email list" <main@Q-list.groups.io>
Subject: [Q-List] Jerry come lately
Date: Sun, 8 Mar 2020 17:18:26 -0400

I am slow on the trigger, but today I experienced my first flight of the year.  There are legitimate reasons – so I believe.

 

June 19, 2019, I had my left knee replaced.  That grounded me for tooooo long.  I did get a chance to fly twice at the end of October before having my right knee replaced on November 4.  That likewise kept me out of the air until today.  Actually, I could have flown a little earlier, but in between the two knee surgeries I somehow came up with a hernia.  That delayed my flying for another 4 weeks.  Not so much that I couldn’t fly during the hernia recovery, the doctor was concerned about the force required to push the tail down and spin the plane around to then push it uphill out of the hangar.  Guess I should not have described that part to him.

 

Fortunately, Nancy took me for a couple of rides over the last two weeks to familiarize me with the art of flying.  Today was the perfect day.  CAVU and calm.  As in the past, I found that muscle memory carried me through the flying maneuvers, but I really lose familiarity with the cockpit.

I know what I want to look at, but I can’t seem to find it on the instrument panel.  No matter how much broomstick flying I do in the cockpit before a flight after a long layoff, I still have trouble finding the instrument I want to scan.  I know it isn’t old-age because I have always had this problem.  Fortunately, after a few minutes in the air, the instruments seem to relocate themselves to where I remember them being.

 

Anyway, I had my first flight of 2020 and it quickly reminded me of why we love this little airplane so much.  Worth every minute of construction time required to get one completed (if they ever are REALLY completed) and airborne.  For those still building, DON”T STOP.  Doing so will only cause you great lament in the future.

 

Wishing you all a great flying season.  Hope we can all get to Spring Fling and Field of Dreams!!

Jerry Marstall

Asheville, NC

Tri-Q200

900 hrs.



Jerry Marstall
 

Thx Jay. It's great that you are still experimenting.  Isn't it fun!

-------- Original message --------
From: Jay Scheevel <jay@...>
Date: 3/8/20 8:21 PM (GMT-05:00)
To: main@Q-List.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Q-List] Jerry come lately

Great report, Jerry!

So glad you are back in the air in your beautiful little bird. Better yet to hear you are all healed up (or at least mostly).

Still working on installing elevator trim, so I can "balance" the reflexor trim and the elevator trim for best effect depending on cg. More on that once I get it in the air.

Cheers,
Jay

Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID


Jerry Marstall <jnmarstall@...> wrote:

I am slow on the trigger, but today I experienced my first flight of the year.  There are legitimate reasons – so I believe.

 

June 19, 2019, I had my left knee replaced.  That grounded me for tooooo long.  I did get a chance to fly twice at the end of October before having my right knee replaced on November 4.  That likewise kept me out of the air until today.  Actually, I could have flown a little earlier, but in between the two knee surgeries I somehow came up with a hernia.  That delayed my flying for another 4 weeks.  Not so much that I couldn’t fly during the hernia recovery, the doctor was concerned about the force required to push the tail down and spin the plane around to then push it uphill out of the hangar.  Guess I should not have described that part to him.

 

Fortunately, Nancy took me for a couple of rides over the last two weeks to familiarize me with the art of flying.  Today was the perfect day.  CAVU and calm.  As in the past, I found that muscle memory carried me through the flying maneuvers, but I really lose familiarity with the cockpit.

I know what I want to look at, but I can’t seem to find it on the instrument panel.  No matter how much broomstick flying I do in the cockpit before a flight after a long layoff, I still have trouble finding the instrument I want to scan.  I know it isn’t old-age because I have always had this problem.  Fortunately, after a few minutes in the air, the instruments seem to relocate themselves to where I remember them being.

 

Anyway, I had my first flight of 2020 and it quickly reminded me of why we love this little airplane so much.  Worth every minute of construction time required to get one completed (if they ever are REALLY completed) and airborne.  For those still building, DON”T STOP.  Doing so will only cause you great lament in the future.

 

Wishing you all a great flying season.  Hope we can all get to Spring Fling and Field of Dreams!!

Jerry Marstall

Asheville, NC

Tri-Q200

900 hrs.

Jim Patillo
 

Hey Jerry,

Good to hear you are doing much better. I still fly every week but if I’m out of the Q for a a couple of weeks for maintenance, other airplanes or whatever, it takes a few  minutes to reorient. I think you’re perfectly fine for our ripe old ages. I believe learned motor skills tend to remain intact and are more readily accessible than visual or audible cues for some reason.

I still play my trumpet and the cat isn’t screeching.  I was in the marching band. Go Razorbacks! The fingers know what to do even if the lips don’t  Ha ha!

Glad to hear your flying again! 

P.S. Jerry is right, you will never regret building and flying but you will always regret not. Build on!

Jim
N46JP - Q200






Jay Scheevel
 

Great report, Jerry!

So glad you are back in the air in your beautiful little bird. Better yet to hear you are all healed up (or at least mostly).

Still working on installing elevator trim, so I can "balance" the reflexor trim and the elevator trim for best effect depending on cg. More on that once I get it in the air.

Cheers,
Jay

Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID


Jerry Marstall <jnmarstall@...> wrote:

I am slow on the trigger, but today I experienced my first flight of the year.  There are legitimate reasons – so I believe.

 

June 19, 2019, I had my left knee replaced.  That grounded me for tooooo long.  I did get a chance to fly twice at the end of October before having my right knee replaced on November 4.  That likewise kept me out of the air until today.  Actually, I could have flown a little earlier, but in between the two knee surgeries I somehow came up with a hernia.  That delayed my flying for another 4 weeks.  Not so much that I couldn’t fly during the hernia recovery, the doctor was concerned about the force required to push the tail down and spin the plane around to then push it uphill out of the hangar.  Guess I should not have described that part to him.

 

Fortunately, Nancy took me for a couple of rides over the last two weeks to familiarize me with the art of flying.  Today was the perfect day.  CAVU and calm.  As in the past, I found that muscle memory carried me through the flying maneuvers, but I really lose familiarity with the cockpit.

I know what I want to look at, but I can’t seem to find it on the instrument panel.  No matter how much broomstick flying I do in the cockpit before a flight after a long layoff, I still have trouble finding the instrument I want to scan.  I know it isn’t old-age because I have always had this problem.  Fortunately, after a few minutes in the air, the instruments seem to relocate themselves to where I remember them being.

 

Anyway, I had my first flight of 2020 and it quickly reminded me of why we love this little airplane so much.  Worth every minute of construction time required to get one completed (if they ever are REALLY completed) and airborne.  For those still building, DON”T STOP.  Doing so will only cause you great lament in the future.

 

Wishing you all a great flying season.  Hope we can all get to Spring Fling and Field of Dreams!!

Jerry Marstall

Asheville, NC

Tri-Q200

900 hrs.

Mike Dwyer
 

Good report Jerry.  Reminds me that we are getting old!  
Not much from me lately as they are repaving a couple of runways at our airport and it's a terrible mess... So I bought a fixer upper boat!
Never learn!
Mike Dwyer

YouTube Videos: https://goo.gl/yKEHfK
Q200 Website: http://goo.gl/V8IrJF


On Sun, Mar 8, 2020 at 5:18 PM Jerry Marstall <jnmarstall@...> wrote:

I am slow on the trigger, but today I experienced my first flight of the year.  There are legitimate reasons – so I believe.

 

June 19, 2019, I had my left knee replaced.  That grounded me for tooooo long.  I did get a chance to fly twice at the end of October before having my right knee replaced on November 4.  That likewise kept me out of the air until today.  Actually, I could have flown a little earlier, but in between the two knee surgeries I somehow came up with a hernia.  That delayed my flying for another 4 weeks.  Not so much that I couldn’t fly during the hernia recovery, the doctor was concerned about the force required to push the tail down and spin the plane around to then push it uphill out of the hangar.  Guess I should not have described that part to him.

 

Fortunately, Nancy took me for a couple of rides over the last two weeks to familiarize me with the art of flying.  Today was the perfect day.  CAVU and calm.  As in the past, I found that muscle memory carried me through the flying maneuvers, but I really lose familiarity with the cockpit.

I know what I want to look at, but I can’t seem to find it on the instrument panel.  No matter how much broomstick flying I do in the cockpit before a flight after a long layoff, I still have trouble finding the instrument I want to scan.  I know it isn’t old-age because I have always had this problem.  Fortunately, after a few minutes in the air, the instruments seem to relocate themselves to where I remember them being.

 

Anyway, I had my first flight of 2020 and it quickly reminded me of why we love this little airplane so much.  Worth every minute of construction time required to get one completed (if they ever are REALLY completed) and airborne.  For those still building, DON”T STOP.  Doing so will only cause you great lament in the future.

 

Wishing you all a great flying season.  Hope we can all get to Spring Fling and Field of Dreams!!

Jerry Marstall

Asheville, NC

Tri-Q200

900 hrs.

Jerry Marstall
 

I am slow on the trigger, but today I experienced my first flight of the year.  There are legitimate reasons – so I believe.

 

June 19, 2019, I had my left knee replaced.  That grounded me for tooooo long.  I did get a chance to fly twice at the end of October before having my right knee replaced on November 4.  That likewise kept me out of the air until today.  Actually, I could have flown a little earlier, but in between the two knee surgeries I somehow came up with a hernia.  That delayed my flying for another 4 weeks.  Not so much that I couldn’t fly during the hernia recovery, the doctor was concerned about the force required to push the tail down and spin the plane around to then push it uphill out of the hangar.  Guess I should not have described that part to him.

 

Fortunately, Nancy took me for a couple of rides over the last two weeks to familiarize me with the art of flying.  Today was the perfect day.  CAVU and calm.  As in the past, I found that muscle memory carried me through the flying maneuvers, but I really lose familiarity with the cockpit.

I know what I want to look at, but I can’t seem to find it on the instrument panel.  No matter how much broomstick flying I do in the cockpit before a flight after a long layoff, I still have trouble finding the instrument I want to scan.  I know it isn’t old-age because I have always had this problem.  Fortunately, after a few minutes in the air, the instruments seem to relocate themselves to where I remember them being.

 

Anyway, I had my first flight of 2020 and it quickly reminded me of why we love this little airplane so much.  Worth every minute of construction time required to get one completed (if they ever are REALLY completed) and airborne.  For those still building, DON”T STOP.  Doing so will only cause you great lament in the future.

 

Wishing you all a great flying season.  Hope we can all get to Spring Fling and Field of Dreams!!

Jerry Marstall

Asheville, NC

Tri-Q200

900 hrs.