Im Sorry, I Crashed my Q2


Joe Hood
 

I spent so much time learning how to fly my Q2 (high speed taxis and all) but didn't learn proper performance taking off at 8000' density altitude.

The alternate airport I chose from the air had way too short of a runway (3400') when just 20 miles more was a strip of 9000' (I normally fly out of 3500' runway (at 839'), so the normal warning bells didn't sound). My planned destination had a 10,000' strip.

On take off, doing the normal hold the stick back until rotation, then release pressure at 70: nothing happened. 75mph, still on the ground. 50 foot wide runway and my hold the plane on the centerline was not good enough to brake and remain on the runway. At the end of the runway was a cliff. I ended up trying to push the plane into ground effect, like other planes but only succeeded in porpoising and rolling right. I leveled on the way down, impacted terrain, then off a bluff, landing in a Russian Olive tree (overlooking a river valley at U10).

I am lucky to be alive.

In hindsight I didn't need to learn mountain flying at the same time as learning to fly the Q2; flying her was like having fleeting time with a high school crush. The Q2 was like the perfect horse, you could direct her whichever direction you wanted her to go.


 

Joe, glad you made it out! 

What engine is in your bird?

You can contact me directly @ anrogers29@...

Take care, and again, glad you're okay and everything!  👍



On Wed, Jul 15, 2020 at 11:46 AM Joe Hood <joe.hood@...> wrote:

I spent so much time learning how to fly my Q2 (high speed taxis and all) but didn't learn proper performance taking off at 8000' density altitude.

The alternate airport I chose from the air had way too short of a runway (3400') when just 20 miles more was a strip of 9000' (I normally fly out of 3500' runway (at 839'), so the normal warning bells didn't sound). My planned destination had a 10,000' strip.

On take off, doing the normal hold the stick back until rotation, then release pressure at 70: nothing happened. 75mph, still on the ground. 50 foot wide runway and my hold the plane on the centerline was not good enough to brake and remain on the runway. At the end of the runway was a cliff. I ended up trying to push the plane into ground effect, like other planes but only succeeded in porpoising and rolling right. I leveled on the way down, impacted terrain, then off a bluff, landing in a Russian Olive tree (overlooking a river valley at U10).

I am lucky to be alive.

In hindsight I didn't need to learn mountain flying at the same time as learning to fly the Q2; flying her was like having fleeting time with a high school crush. The Q2 was like the perfect horse, you could direct her whichever direction you wanted her to go.



--
Thank you for the opportunity!
 
Adrian Rogers

CalBRE# 01890975

Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage
805-415-3600 cell


Joe Hood
 

Just to clarify, this wasn't my first flight but the start of the second leg, after 3.5 hours of cross-country flying. I had done a number of touch and goes but only in density altitudes up to 4500'.


On Wed, Jul 15, 2020 at 2:46 PM Joe Hood via groups.io <joe.hood=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:

I spent so much time learning how to fly my Q2 (high speed taxis and all) but didn't learn proper performance taking off at 8000' density altitude.

The alternate airport I chose from the air had way too short of a runway (3400') when just 20 miles more was a strip of 9000' (I normally fly out of 3500' runway (at 839'), so the normal warning bells didn't sound). My planned destination had a 10,000' strip.

On take off, doing the normal hold the stick back until rotation, then release pressure at 70: nothing happened. 75mph, still on the ground. 50 foot wide runway and my hold the plane on the centerline was not good enough to brake and remain on the runway. At the end of the runway was a cliff. I ended up trying to push the plane into ground effect, like other planes but only succeeded in porpoising and rolling right. I leveled on the way down, impacted terrain, then off a bluff, landing in a Russian Olive tree (overlooking a river valley at U10).

I am lucky to be alive.

In hindsight I didn't need to learn mountain flying at the same time as learning to fly the Q2; flying her was like having fleeting time with a high school crush. The Q2 was like the perfect horse, you could direct her whichever direction you wanted her to go.


victor taylor
 

Don’t feel bad. I deliver Velocities as part of my income and a few years ago I delivered a 310 hp Velocity XL. The controller said “check your DA”. I said Roger and we are ready to go. The DA Ws around 10,000 ft. It climbed out but I knew when I lifted off that it was at its limit. The problem was that the terrain ahead of me was climbing also. I vowed then and there to always check if there’s any question. 

Victor 



On Jul 15, 2020, at 14:14, Joe Hood <joe.hood@...> wrote:


Just to clarify, this wasn't my first flight but the start of the second leg, after 3.5 hours of cross-country flying. I had done a number of touch and goes but only in density altitudes up to 4500'.

On Wed, Jul 15, 2020 at 2:46 PM Joe Hood via groups.io <joe.hood=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:

I spent so much time learning how to fly my Q2 (high speed taxis and all) but didn't learn proper performance taking off at 8000' density altitude.

The alternate airport I chose from the air had way too short of a runway (3400') when just 20 miles more was a strip of 9000' (I normally fly out of 3500' runway (at 839'), so the normal warning bells didn't sound). My planned destination had a 10,000' strip.

On take off, doing the normal hold the stick back until rotation, then release pressure at 70: nothing happened. 75mph, still on the ground. 50 foot wide runway and my hold the plane on the centerline was not good enough to brake and remain on the runway. At the end of the runway was a cliff. I ended up trying to push the plane into ground effect, like other planes but only succeeded in porpoising and rolling right. I leveled on the way down, impacted terrain, then off a bluff, landing in a Russian Olive tree (overlooking a river valley at U10).

I am lucky to be alive.

In hindsight I didn't need to learn mountain flying at the same time as learning to fly the Q2; flying her was like having fleeting time with a high school crush. The Q2 was like the perfect horse, you could direct her whichever direction you wanted her to go.


Martin Skiby
 

Wow Joe that is terrible.

So glad you are OK however.  Good lesson, but one that was tough to learn and tough for us to read.  Hang in there and again glad you are OK. 

Sincerely,

-----------------------------------------

From: "Joe Hood"
To: "main@Q-List.groups.io Group Moderators"
Cc:
Sent: Wednesday July 15 2020 12:14:53PM
Subject: Re: [Q-List] Im Sorry, I Crashed my Q2

Just to clarify, this wasn't my first flight but the start of the second leg, after 3.5 hours of cross-country flying. I had done a number of touch and goes but only in density altitudes up to 4500'.


On Wed, Jul 15, 2020 at 2:46 PM Joe Hood via groups.io <joe.hood=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:

I spent so much time learning how to fly my Q2 (high speed taxis and all) but didn't learn proper performance taking off at 8000' density altitude.

The alternate airport I chose from the air had way too short of a runway (3400') when just 20 miles more was a strip of 9000' (I normally fly out of 3500' runway (at 839'), so the normal warning bells didn't sound). My planned destination had a 10,000' strip.

On take off, doing the normal hold the stick back until rotation, then release pressure at 70: nothing happened. 75mph, still on the ground. 50 foot wide runway and my hold the plane on the centerline was not good enough to brake and remain on the runway. At the end of the runway was a cliff. I ended up trying to push the plane into ground effect, like other planes but only succeeded in porpoising and rolling right. I leveled on the way down, impacted terrain, then off a bluff, landing in a Russian Olive tree (overlooking a river valley at U10).

I am lucky to be alive.

In hindsight I didn't need to learn mountain flying at the same time as learning to fly the Q2; flying her was like having fleeting time with a high school crush. The Q2 was like the perfect horse, you could direct her whichever direction you wanted her to go.


John Hoxie
 

Joe,
Terribly sorry to hear about that. Can you retrieve it now or does the NTSB investigate? Mine is still a project, so I can't speak from experience, but I will add 500 feet of runway length required for every thousand feet of density altitude. My local airport is 9200 feet long and 4200 elevation. This time of year it is in the upper 90s and 100s, but the humidity is low.

 
John Hoxie
He is no fool, who gives up what he can not keep, to gain what he can not loose -- Jim Elliot


On Wednesday, July 15, 2020, 12:46:34 PM MDT, Joe Hood <joe.hood@...> wrote:


I spent so much time learning how to fly my Q2 (high speed taxis and all) but didn't learn proper performance taking off at 8000' density altitude.

The alternate airport I chose from the air had way too short of a runway (3400') when just 20 miles more was a strip of 9000' (I normally fly out of 3500' runway (at 839'), so the normal warning bells didn't sound). My planned destination had a 10,000' strip.

On take off, doing the normal hold the stick back until rotation, then release pressure at 70: nothing happened. 75mph, still on the ground. 50 foot wide runway and my hold the plane on the centerline was not good enough to brake and remain on the runway. At the end of the runway was a cliff. I ended up trying to push the plane into ground effect, like other planes but only succeeded in porpoising and rolling right. I leveled on the way down, impacted terrain, then off a bluff, landing in a Russian Olive tree (overlooking a river valley at U10).

I am lucky to be alive.

In hindsight I didn't need to learn mountain flying at the same time as learning to fly the Q2; flying her was like having fleeting time with a high school crush. The Q2 was like the perfect horse, you could direct her whichever direction you wanted her to go.


Joe Hood
 

Talked to both FAA and NTSB. They both had pictures, so I don't think there is any hold. I think with the visible delamination, there is no putting her back together. One blade of the wooden prop is broken but the wings appeared to take the bulk of the damage, so the 75hp Revmaster could go somewhere. But the wreckage is in Preston, ID and I'm now back in MI.


On Wed, Jul 15, 2020 at 3:25 PM John Hoxie via groups.io <hoxdesigns=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Joe,
Terribly sorry to hear about that. Can you retrieve it now or does the NTSB investigate? Mine is still a project, so I can't speak from experience, but I will add 500 feet of runway length required for every thousand feet of density altitude. My local airport is 9200 feet long and 4200 elevation. This time of year it is in the upper 90s and 100s, but the humidity is low.

 
John Hoxie
He is no fool, who gives up what he can not keep, to gain what he can not loose -- Jim Elliot


On Wednesday, July 15, 2020, 12:46:34 PM MDT, Joe Hood <joe.hood@...> wrote:


I spent so much time learning how to fly my Q2 (high speed taxis and all) but didn't learn proper performance taking off at 8000' density altitude.

The alternate airport I chose from the air had way too short of a runway (3400') when just 20 miles more was a strip of 9000' (I normally fly out of 3500' runway (at 839'), so the normal warning bells didn't sound). My planned destination had a 10,000' strip.

On take off, doing the normal hold the stick back until rotation, then release pressure at 70: nothing happened. 75mph, still on the ground. 50 foot wide runway and my hold the plane on the centerline was not good enough to brake and remain on the runway. At the end of the runway was a cliff. I ended up trying to push the plane into ground effect, like other planes but only succeeded in porpoising and rolling right. I leveled on the way down, impacted terrain, then off a bluff, landing in a Russian Olive tree (overlooking a river valley at U10).

I am lucky to be alive.

In hindsight I didn't need to learn mountain flying at the same time as learning to fly the Q2; flying her was like having fleeting time with a high school crush. The Q2 was like the perfect horse, you could direct her whichever direction you wanted her to go.


Paul Fisher
 

Joe, 
I'm glad you are alright.  And thank you for sharing, hopefully someone else can learn from this.  A 3400 foot runway with 8000' density altitude is just scary!

Paul


On Wed, Jul 15, 2020, 14:14 Joe Hood <joe.hood@...> wrote:
Just to clarify, this wasn't my first flight but the start of the second leg, after 3.5 hours of cross-country flying. I had done a number of touch and goes but only in density altitudes up to 4500'.

On Wed, Jul 15, 2020 at 2:46 PM Joe Hood via groups.io <joe.hood=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:

I spent so much time learning how to fly my Q2 (high speed taxis and all) but didn't learn proper performance taking off at 8000' density altitude.

The alternate airport I chose from the air had way too short of a runway (3400') when just 20 miles more was a strip of 9000' (I normally fly out of 3500' runway (at 839'), so the normal warning bells didn't sound). My planned destination had a 10,000' strip.

On take off, doing the normal hold the stick back until rotation, then release pressure at 70: nothing happened. 75mph, still on the ground. 50 foot wide runway and my hold the plane on the centerline was not good enough to brake and remain on the runway. At the end of the runway was a cliff. I ended up trying to push the plane into ground effect, like other planes but only succeeded in porpoising and rolling right. I leveled on the way down, impacted terrain, then off a bluff, landing in a Russian Olive tree (overlooking a river valley at U10).

I am lucky to be alive.

In hindsight I didn't need to learn mountain flying at the same time as learning to fly the Q2; flying her was like having fleeting time with a high school crush. The Q2 was like the perfect horse, you could direct her whichever direction you wanted her to go.


Mike Dwyer
 

Sorry to hear that.  I wonder if you set the mixture prior to take off?  A full rich mixture might have bogged the engine down.  So glad you walked away tho!
Mike Dwyer Q200 N3QP

YouTube Videos: https://goo.gl/yKEHfK
Q200 Website: http://goo.gl/V8IrJF


On Wed, Jul 15, 2020 at 2:46 PM Joe Hood <joe.hood@...> wrote:

I spent so much time learning how to fly my Q2 (high speed taxis and all) but didn't learn proper performance taking off at 8000' density altitude.

The alternate airport I chose from the air had way too short of a runway (3400') when just 20 miles more was a strip of 9000' (I normally fly out of 3500' runway (at 839'), so the normal warning bells didn't sound). My planned destination had a 10,000' strip.

On take off, doing the normal hold the stick back until rotation, then release pressure at 70: nothing happened. 75mph, still on the ground. 50 foot wide runway and my hold the plane on the centerline was not good enough to brake and remain on the runway. At the end of the runway was a cliff. I ended up trying to push the plane into ground effect, like other planes but only succeeded in porpoising and rolling right. I leveled on the way down, impacted terrain, then off a bluff, landing in a Russian Olive tree (overlooking a river valley at U10).

I am lucky to be alive.

In hindsight I didn't need to learn mountain flying at the same time as learning to fly the Q2; flying her was like having fleeting time with a high school crush. The Q2 was like the perfect horse, you could direct her whichever direction you wanted her to go.


Joe Hood
 

Very likely full rich, as I followed the checklist, without further thought.


On Wed, Jul 15, 2020 at 4:35 PM Mike Dwyer <q200pilot@...> wrote:
Sorry to hear that.  I wonder if you set the mixture prior to take off?  A full rich mixture might have bogged the engine down.  So glad you walked away tho!
Mike Dwyer Q200 N3QP

YouTube Videos: https://goo.gl/yKEHfK
Q200 Website: http://goo.gl/V8IrJF


On Wed, Jul 15, 2020 at 2:46 PM Joe Hood <joe.hood@...> wrote:

I spent so much time learning how to fly my Q2 (high speed taxis and all) but didn't learn proper performance taking off at 8000' density altitude.

The alternate airport I chose from the air had way too short of a runway (3400') when just 20 miles more was a strip of 9000' (I normally fly out of 3500' runway (at 839'), so the normal warning bells didn't sound). My planned destination had a 10,000' strip.

On take off, doing the normal hold the stick back until rotation, then release pressure at 70: nothing happened. 75mph, still on the ground. 50 foot wide runway and my hold the plane on the centerline was not good enough to brake and remain on the runway. At the end of the runway was a cliff. I ended up trying to push the plane into ground effect, like other planes but only succeeded in porpoising and rolling right. I leveled on the way down, impacted terrain, then off a bluff, landing in a Russian Olive tree (overlooking a river valley at U10).

I am lucky to be alive.

In hindsight I didn't need to learn mountain flying at the same time as learning to fly the Q2; flying her was like having fleeting time with a high school crush. The Q2 was like the perfect horse, you could direct her whichever direction you wanted her to go.


Sam Hoskins
 

Joe, as someone who has had their share of distressing experiences, I feel your pain. I'm sorry to hear about your accident.

Sam 

On Wed, Jul 15, 2020, 1:46 PM Joe Hood <joe.hood@...> wrote:

I spent so much time learning how to fly my Q2 (high speed taxis and all) but didn't learn proper performance taking off at 8000' density altitude.

The alternate airport I chose from the air had way too short of a runway (3400') when just 20 miles more was a strip of 9000' (I normally fly out of 3500' runway (at 839'), so the normal warning bells didn't sound). My planned destination had a 10,000' strip.

On take off, doing the normal hold the stick back until rotation, then release pressure at 70: nothing happened. 75mph, still on the ground. 50 foot wide runway and my hold the plane on the centerline was not good enough to brake and remain on the runway. At the end of the runway was a cliff. I ended up trying to push the plane into ground effect, like other planes but only succeeded in porpoising and rolling right. I leveled on the way down, impacted terrain, then off a bluff, landing in a Russian Olive tree (overlooking a river valley at U10).

I am lucky to be alive.

In hindsight I didn't need to learn mountain flying at the same time as learning to fly the Q2; flying her was like having fleeting time with a high school crush. The Q2 was like the perfect horse, you could direct her whichever direction you wanted her to go.


JMasal@...
 

AND a 75 horse Revmaster.
A 3400 foot runway with 8000' density altitude is just scary!



-----Original Message-----
From: Paul Fisher <rv7a.n18pf@...>
To: main@q-list.groups.io
Sent: Wed, Jul 15, 2020 2:33 pm
Subject: Re: [Q-List] Im Sorry, I Crashed my Q2

Joe, 
I'm glad you are alright.  And thank you for sharing, hopefully someone else can learn from this.  A 3400 foot runway with 8000' density altitude is just scary!

Paul


On Wed, Jul 15, 2020, 14:14 Joe Hood <joe.hood@...> wrote:
Just to clarify, this wasn't my first flight but the start of the second leg, after 3.5 hours of cross-country flying. I had done a number of touch and goes but only in density altitudes up to 4500'.

On Wed, Jul 15, 2020 at 2:46 PM Joe Hood via groups.io <joe.hood=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:
I spent so much time learning how to fly my Q2 (high speed taxis and all) but didn't learn proper performance taking off at 8000' density altitude.
The alternate airport I chose from the air had way too short of a runway (3400') when just 20 miles more was a strip of 9000' (I normally fly out of 3500' runway (at 839'), so the normal warning bells didn't sound). My planned destination had a 10,000' strip.

On take off, doing the normal hold the stick back until rotation, then release pressure at 70: nothing happened. 75mph, still on the ground. 50 foot wide runway and my hold the plane on the centerline was not good enough to brake and remain on the runway. At the end of the runway was a cliff. I ended up trying to push the plane into ground effect, like other planes but only succeeded in porpoising and rolling right. I leveled on the way down, impacted terrain, then off a bluff, landing in a Russian Olive tree (overlooking a river valley at U10).
I am lucky to be alive.
In hindsight I didn't need to learn mountain flying at the same time as learning to fly the Q2; flying her was like having fleeting time with a high school crush. The Q2 was like the perfect horse, you could direct her whichever direction you wanted her to go.


John Hoxie
 

I'm surprised you had enough length to land. Was the DA much lower when you landed?


On Wed, Jul 15, 2020 at 3:37 PM, JMasal via groups.io
<JMasal@...> wrote:
AND a 75 horse Revmaster.
A 3400 foot runway with 8000' density altitude is just scary!



-----Original Message-----
From: Paul Fisher <rv7a.n18pf@...>
To: main@q-list.groups.io
Sent: Wed, Jul 15, 2020 2:33 pm
Subject: Re: [Q-List] Im Sorry, I Crashed my Q2

Joe, 
I'm glad you are alright.  And thank you for sharing, hopefully someone else can learn from this.  A 3400 foot runway with 8000' density altitude is just scary!

Paul


On Wed, Jul 15, 2020, 14:14 Joe Hood <joe.hood@...> wrote:
Just to clarify, this wasn't my first flight but the start of the second leg, after 3.5 hours of cross-country flying. I had done a number of touch and goes but only in density altitudes up to 4500'.

On Wed, Jul 15, 2020 at 2:46 PM Joe Hood via groups.io <joe.hood=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:
I spent so much time learning how to fly my Q2 (high speed taxis and all) but didn't learn proper performance taking off at 8000' density altitude.
The alternate airport I chose from the air had way too short of a runway (3400') when just 20 miles more was a strip of 9000' (I normally fly out of 3500' runway (at 839'), so the normal warning bells didn't sound). My planned destination had a 10,000' strip.

On take off, doing the normal hold the stick back until rotation, then release pressure at 70: nothing happened. 75mph, still on the ground. 50 foot wide runway and my hold the plane on the centerline was not good enough to brake and remain on the runway. At the end of the runway was a cliff. I ended up trying to push the plane into ground effect, like other planes but only succeeded in porpoising and rolling right. I leveled on the way down, impacted terrain, then off a bluff, landing in a Russian Olive tree (overlooking a river valley at U10).
I am lucky to be alive.
In hindsight I didn't need to learn mountain flying at the same time as learning to fly the Q2; flying her was like having fleeting time with a high school crush. The Q2 was like the perfect horse, you could direct her whichever direction you wanted her to go.


Jay Scheevel
 

Thanks for the report, Joe. I am sorry to hear about your plane, but very glad that you got out unhurt and chose to share your tale with us.

 

I agree with Paul and Jim M., especially the point that the Revmaster is no engine for high density altitude.

 

I apologize if any of my flight reports about my short strip have given the impression that this is routine for a Q2. It is not, even for mine. I have a Jabiru 3300 engine (200 cu. In.) which does 120 hp at sea level. My static RPM is close to the redline of a continental O-200, so I am generating a lot of power, even at high density altitude, yet I am still am wary of density altitude. My previous plane which I logged 300+ hours out of my short field had the same power loading and wing loading as my Tri-Q2, so I also had that reference point.

 

I think Joe is well aware of this issue now, but please, no one else on this group should be cavalier about density altitude when it comes to these Q’s. I spent a lot of time documenting take-off distance as a function of DA on a 10,000’ runway before I ever considered going in or out of my home strip. Even then, the first flights in and out were in the winter and were very focused on documenting the capabilities.

 

If you have the test flight data to support your efforts, you can verify the envelope, but you should gather the data and scrutinize it before you even think about pushing limits.

 

Cheers,

Jay  Tri-Q2, N8WQ 100 hours.

 

From: main@Q-List.groups.io <main@Q-List.groups.io> On Behalf Of JMasal via groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, July 15, 2020 3:37 PM
To: main@Q-List.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Q-List] Im Sorry, I Crashed my Q2

 

AND a 75 horse Revmaster.

A 3400 foot runway with 8000' density altitude is just scary!



-----Original Message-----
From: Paul Fisher <rv7a.n18pf@...>
To: main@q-list.groups.io
Sent: Wed, Jul 15, 2020 2:33 pm
Subject: Re: [Q-List] Im Sorry, I Crashed my Q2

Joe, 

I'm glad you are alright.  And thank you for sharing, hopefully someone else can learn from this.  A 3400 foot runway with 8000' density altitude is just scary!

 

Paul

 

On Wed, Jul 15, 2020, 14:14 Joe Hood <joe.hood@...> wrote:

Just to clarify, this wasn't my first flight but the start of the second leg, after 3.5 hours of cross-country flying. I had done a number of touch and goes but only in density altitudes up to 4500'.

 

On Wed, Jul 15, 2020 at 2:46 PM Joe Hood via groups.io <joe.hood=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:

I spent so much time learning how to fly my Q2 (high speed taxis and all) but didn't learn proper performance taking off at 8000' density altitude.

The alternate airport I chose from the air had way too short of a runway (3400') when just 20 miles more was a strip of 9000' (I normally fly out of 3500' runway (at 839'), so the normal warning bells didn't sound). My planned destination had a 10,000' strip.

On take off, doing the normal hold the stick back until rotation, then release pressure at 70: nothing happened. 75mph, still on the ground. 50 foot wide runway and my hold the plane on the centerline was not good enough to brake and remain on the runway. At the end of the runway was a cliff. I ended up trying to push the plane into ground effect, like other planes but only succeeded in porpoising and rolling right. I leveled on the way down, impacted terrain, then off a bluff, landing in a Russian Olive tree (overlooking a river valley at U10).

I am lucky to be alive.

In hindsight I didn't need to learn mountain flying at the same time as learning to fly the Q2; flying her was like having fleeting time with a high school crush. The Q2 was like the perfect horse, you could direct her whichever direction you wanted her to go.


One Sky Dog
 

Preston, Idaho was on my phase one north boundary. I flew up there once in my Dragonfly and gave it a look and decided NO. 

Glad you are ok and yes you do need to lean for best power at altitudes.

Right now At OGD 4361 ft pa 89.8 F. 7334 Ft DA 

On Jul 15, 2020, at 1:32 PM, Joe Hood <joe.hood@...> wrote:


Talked to both FAA and NTSB. They both had pictures, so I don't think there is any hold. I think with the visible delamination, there is no putting her back together. One blade of the wooden prop is broken but the wings appeared to take the bulk of the damage, so the 75hp Revmaster could go somewhere. But the wreckage is in Preston, ID and I'm now back in MI.

On Wed, Jul 15, 2020 at 3:25 PM John Hoxie via groups.io <hoxdesigns=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Joe,
Terribly sorry to hear about that. Can you retrieve it now or does the NTSB investigate? Mine is still a project, so I can't speak from experience, but I will add 500 feet of runway length required for every thousand feet of density altitude. My local airport is 9200 feet long and 4200 elevation. This time of year it is in the upper 90s and 100s, but the humidity is low.

 
John Hoxie
He is no fool, who gives up what he can not keep, to gain what he can not loose -- Jim Elliot


On Wednesday, July 15, 2020, 12:46:34 PM MDT, Joe Hood <joe.hood@...> wrote:


I spent so much time learning how to fly my Q2 (high speed taxis and all) but didn't learn proper performance taking off at 8000' density altitude.

The alternate airport I chose from the air had way too short of a runway (3400') when just 20 miles more was a strip of 9000' (I normally fly out of 3500' runway (at 839'), so the normal warning bells didn't sound). My planned destination had a 10,000' strip.

On take off, doing the normal hold the stick back until rotation, then release pressure at 70: nothing happened. 75mph, still on the ground. 50 foot wide runway and my hold the plane on the centerline was not good enough to brake and remain on the runway. At the end of the runway was a cliff. I ended up trying to push the plane into ground effect, like other planes but only succeeded in porpoising and rolling right. I leveled on the way down, impacted terrain, then off a bluff, landing in a Russian Olive tree (overlooking a river valley at U10).

I am lucky to be alive.

In hindsight I didn't need to learn mountain flying at the same time as learning to fly the Q2; flying her was like having fleeting time with a high school crush. The Q2 was like the perfect horse, you could direct her whichever direction you wanted her to go.


John ten
 

Glad to hear you walked / limped away..a hard lesson to learn. 

I would suspect you were well down on power.  If your report saves one person from a similar or worse fate, it was not a complete loss. I could not help but reflect that your images were the perfect metaphor for 2020...

What are the plans going forward?


On Thu, 16 Jul. 2020 at 6:46 am, Joe Hood
<joe.hood@...> wrote:

I spent so much time learning how to fly my Q2 (high speed taxis and all) but didn't learn proper performance taking off at 8000' density altitude.

The alternate airport I chose from the air had way too short of a runway (3400') when just 20 miles more was a strip of 9000' (I normally fly out of 3500' runway (at 839'), so the normal warning bells didn't sound). My planned destination had a 10,000' strip.

On take off, doing the normal hold the stick back until rotation, then release pressure at 70: nothing happened. 75mph, still on the ground. 50 foot wide runway and my hold the plane on the centerline was not good enough to brake and remain on the runway. At the end of the runway was a cliff. I ended up trying to push the plane into ground effect, like other planes but only succeeded in porpoising and rolling right. I leveled on the way down, impacted terrain, then off a bluff, landing in a Russian Olive tree (overlooking a river valley at U10).

I am lucky to be alive.

In hindsight I didn't need to learn mountain flying at the same time as learning to fly the Q2; flying her was like having fleeting time with a high school crush. The Q2 was like the perfect horse, you could direct her whichever direction you wanted her to go.


Joe Hood
 

I don't think with the visible delamination in the fuselage that I have anything worth rebuilding. A bit of uncertainty now as family members weigh in and may have to delay my dreaming again.


On Wed, Jul 15, 2020 at 8:11 PM John ten via groups.io <johntenhave=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Glad to hear you walked / limped away..a hard lesson to learn. 

I would suspect you were well down on power.  If your report saves one person from a similar or worse fate, it was not a complete loss. I could not help but reflect that your images were the perfect metaphor for 2020...

What are the plans going forward?


On Thu, 16 Jul. 2020 at 6:46 am, Joe Hood
<joe.hood@...> wrote:

I spent so much time learning how to fly my Q2 (high speed taxis and all) but didn't learn proper performance taking off at 8000' density altitude.

The alternate airport I chose from the air had way too short of a runway (3400') when just 20 miles more was a strip of 9000' (I normally fly out of 3500' runway (at 839'), so the normal warning bells didn't sound). My planned destination had a 10,000' strip.

On take off, doing the normal hold the stick back until rotation, then release pressure at 70: nothing happened. 75mph, still on the ground. 50 foot wide runway and my hold the plane on the centerline was not good enough to brake and remain on the runway. At the end of the runway was a cliff. I ended up trying to push the plane into ground effect, like other planes but only succeeded in porpoising and rolling right. I leveled on the way down, impacted terrain, then off a bluff, landing in a Russian Olive tree (overlooking a river valley at U10).

I am lucky to be alive.

In hindsight I didn't need to learn mountain flying at the same time as learning to fly the Q2; flying her was like having fleeting time with a high school crush. The Q2 was like the perfect horse, you could direct her whichever direction you wanted her to go.


Dave Dugas
 

Hi Joe
I'm sorry about your crash as well, but glad you are ok. Also grateful for your consideration and courage to share your experience with our group. Things happen quick and could happen to any of us at any time, so sharing your experience hopefully keeps the rest of us alert.
Dave Dugas


On Wed, Jul 15, 2020 at 8:28 PM, Joe Hood
<joe.hood@...> wrote:
I don't think with the visible delamination in the fuselage that I have anything worth rebuilding. A bit of uncertainty now as family members weigh in and may have to delay my dreaming again.

On Wed, Jul 15, 2020 at 8:11 PM John ten via groups.io <johntenhave=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Glad to hear you walked / limped away..a hard lesson to learn. 

I would suspect you were well down on power.  If your report saves one person from a similar or worse fate, it was not a complete loss. I could not help but reflect that your images were the perfect metaphor for 2020...

What are the plans going forward?


On Thu, 16 Jul. 2020 at 6:46 am, Joe Hood
<joe.hood@...> wrote:

I spent so much time learning how to fly my Q2 (high speed taxis and all) but didn't learn proper performance taking off at 8000' density altitude.

The alternate airport I chose from the air had way too short of a runway (3400') when just 20 miles more was a strip of 9000' (I normally fly out of 3500' runway (at 839'), so the normal warning bells didn't sound). My planned destination had a 10,000' strip.

On take off, doing the normal hold the stick back until rotation, then release pressure at 70: nothing happened. 75mph, still on the ground. 50 foot wide runway and my hold the plane on the centerline was not good enough to brake and remain on the runway. At the end of the runway was a cliff. I ended up trying to push the plane into ground effect, like other planes but only succeeded in porpoising and rolling right. I leveled on the way down, impacted terrain, then off a bluff, landing in a Russian Olive tree (overlooking a river valley at U10).

I am lucky to be alive.

In hindsight I didn't need to learn mountain flying at the same time as learning to fly the Q2; flying her was like having fleeting time with a high school crush. The Q2 was like the perfect horse, you could direct her whichever direction you wanted her to go.


Theo Scheepers
 

Hi Joe
I’m so glad that you’re safe. As a matter of interest which  Revmaster engine were you using  the 2,1 L or the 2,4L and what was your aircraft’s empty weight 
Regards 
Theo


On 16 Jul 2020, at 03:03, Dave Dugas via groups.io <davedq2@...> wrote:

Hi Joe
I'm sorry about your crash as well, but glad you are ok. Also grateful for your consideration and courage to share your experience with our group. Things happen quick and could happen to any of us at any time, so sharing your experience hopefully keeps the rest of us alert.
Dave Dugas


On Wed, Jul 15, 2020 at 8:28 PM, Joe Hood
<joe.hood@...> wrote:
I don't think with the visible delamination in the fuselage that I have anything worth rebuilding. A bit of uncertainty now as family members weigh in and may have to delay my dreaming again.

On Wed, Jul 15, 2020 at 8:11 PM John ten via groups.io <johntenhave=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Glad to hear you walked / limped away..a hard lesson to learn. 

I would suspect you were well down on power.  If your report saves one person from a similar or worse fate, it was not a complete loss. I could not help but reflect that your images were the perfect metaphor for 2020...

What are the plans going forward?


On Thu, 16 Jul. 2020 at 6:46 am, Joe Hood
<joe.hood@...> wrote:

I spent so much time learning how to fly my Q2 (high speed taxis and all) but didn't learn proper performance taking off at 8000' density altitude.

The alternate airport I chose from the air had way too short of a runway (3400') when just 20 miles more was a strip of 9000' (I normally fly out of 3500' runway (at 839'), so the normal warning bells didn't sound). My planned destination had a 10,000' strip.

On take off, doing the normal hold the stick back until rotation, then release pressure at 70: nothing happened. 75mph, still on the ground. 50 foot wide runway and my hold the plane on the centerline was not good enough to brake and remain on the runway. At the end of the runway was a cliff. I ended up trying to push the plane into ground effect, like other planes but only succeeded in porpoising and rolling right. I leveled on the way down, impacted terrain, then off a bluff, landing in a Russian Olive tree (overlooking a river valley at U10).

I am lucky to be alive.

In hindsight I didn't need to learn mountain flying at the same time as learning to fly the Q2; flying her was like having fleeting time with a high school crush. The Q2 was like the perfect horse, you could direct her whichever direction you wanted her to go.


Joe Hood
 

2.1 with the 75hp heads. Empty weight of 620 lbs. 

On Thu, Jul 16, 2020 at 7:03 AM Theo Scheepers <theo.intermark@...> wrote:
Hi Joe
I’m so glad that you’re safe. As a matter of interest which  Revmaster engine were you using  the 2,1 L or the 2,4L and what was your aircraft’s empty weight 
Regards 
Theo


On 16 Jul 2020, at 03:03, Dave Dugas via groups.io <davedq2=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

Hi Joe
I'm sorry about your crash as well, but glad you are ok. Also grateful for your consideration and courage to share your experience with our group. Things happen quick and could happen to any of us at any time, so sharing your experience hopefully keeps the rest of us alert.
Dave Dugas


On Wed, Jul 15, 2020 at 8:28 PM, Joe Hood
<joe.hood@...> wrote:
I don't think with the visible delamination in the fuselage that I have anything worth rebuilding. A bit of uncertainty now as family members weigh in and may have to delay my dreaming again.

On Wed, Jul 15, 2020 at 8:11 PM John ten via groups.io <johntenhave=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Glad to hear you walked / limped away..a hard lesson to learn. 

I would suspect you were well down on power.  If your report saves one person from a similar or worse fate, it was not a complete loss. I could not help but reflect that your images were the perfect metaphor for 2020...

What are the plans going forward?


On Thu, 16 Jul. 2020 at 6:46 am, Joe Hood
<joe.hood@...> wrote:

I spent so much time learning how to fly my Q2 (high speed taxis and all) but didn't learn proper performance taking off at 8000' density altitude.

The alternate airport I chose from the air had way too short of a runway (3400') when just 20 miles more was a strip of 9000' (I normally fly out of 3500' runway (at 839'), so the normal warning bells didn't sound). My planned destination had a 10,000' strip.

On take off, doing the normal hold the stick back until rotation, then release pressure at 70: nothing happened. 75mph, still on the ground. 50 foot wide runway and my hold the plane on the centerline was not good enough to brake and remain on the runway. At the end of the runway was a cliff. I ended up trying to push the plane into ground effect, like other planes but only succeeded in porpoising and rolling right. I leveled on the way down, impacted terrain, then off a bluff, landing in a Russian Olive tree (overlooking a river valley at U10).

I am lucky to be alive.

In hindsight I didn't need to learn mountain flying at the same time as learning to fly the Q2; flying her was like having fleeting time with a high school crush. The Q2 was like the perfect horse, you could direct her whichever direction you wanted her to go.