Brake Lines?


 
Edited

My rescue project looks like it has aluminium brake lines inside a nylon tube. Was that the standard?

I am planning to first pressure test my existing lines and see if they are corroded but I am wondering what others have done? Will the aluminium line even pull thru the nylon line inside the canard?

The wonders of buying a plane that sat outside too long ;-)

Robert
--
Robert "TheFrisco" Schmid
(408) 805-5450

www.facebook.com/TheFlyingFriscos
www.theflyingfriscos.com

Love building planes almost as much as flying. Latest completed build is "Loki", a Chinook Plus 2 bush plane.


Jay Scheevel
 

Standard brake lines were nylaflo which is a rigid high strength nylon. Never heard of copper lines but some have used aluminum. I used 1/8” stainless which is part 23 standard now. I find that the narrower diameter is easy to route an easier to bleed, but that’s my personal observation, not an engineering finding. If you use nylaflo, make sure you get the appropriate brass fittings, not the nylon fittings as they will be the wrong size. Aircraft Spruce catalog has a whole section on this. 

Cheers,
Jay 


On May 20, 2022, at 8:41 PM, Robert Schmid <robert@...> wrote:

My rescue project looks like it has copper brake lines inside a nylon tube. Was that the standard?

I am planning to first pressure test my existing lines and see if they are corroded but I am wondering what others have done? Will the copper line even pull thru the nylon line inside the canard?

The wonders of buying a plane that sat outside too long ;-)

Robert
--
Robert "TheFrisco" Schmid
(408) 805-5450

www.facebook.com/TheFlyingFriscos
www.theflyingfriscos.com

Love building planes almost as much as flying. Latest completed build is "Loki", a Chinook Plus 2 bush plane.


 

You are right, they are aluminum, sorry will correct my original post!
--
Robert "TheFrisco" Schmid
(408) 805-5450

www.facebook.com/TheFlyingFriscos
www.theflyingfriscos.com

Love building planes almost as much as flying. Latest completed build is "Loki", a Chinook Plus 2 bush plane.


Michael Dunning
 

Sounds like someone performed the Yates mod...something I've thought about doing myself. Might even be you have Robert or Terry's old plane??


Q-talk 49: Letters

...Brake lines: I got some 1/8" aluminum tubing to use for brake lines on the advise of Terry Yake. It tolerates the heat well and gives good, solid brakes. It will also go inside the Nylaflow tubing we use for brake lines, so it can be retrofitted. Neat, huh? If I think of anything else, I'll send it to you. Still a great newsletter. I enjoy it and the CSA flyer about as much as anything I get. Keep it up. Robert Bounds


-MD
#2827 (still thinking about planning on visualizing how to finish building)


Robert Cringely
 

Rutan standard was Nylaflo brake lines, sometimes with metal lines (or a metal reinforcement) just on the brake end to avoid melting the plastic under heavy braking. So that copper you are seeing may only be a few inches long...


On Fri, May 20, 2022 at 7:41 PM Robert Schmid <robert@...> wrote:
My rescue project looks like it has copper brake lines inside a nylon tube. Was that the standard?

I am planning to first pressure test my existing lines and see if they are corroded but I am wondering what others have done? Will the copper line even pull thru the nylon line inside the canard?

The wonders of buying a plane that sat outside too long ;-)

Robert
--
Robert "TheFrisco" Schmid
(408) 805-5450

www.facebook.com/TheFlyingFriscos
www.theflyingfriscos.com

Love building planes almost as much as flying. Latest completed build is "Loki", a Chinook Plus 2 bush plane.


Edwin Medina
 

In my project I will like to upgrade the brakes, any one know if we can put something similar to Cessnas? Is it necessary to change the structure or alter it?


On Wed, May 25, 2022 at 21:53 Robert Cringely <bob@...> wrote:
Rutan standard was Nylaflo brake lines, sometimes with metal lines (or a metal reinforcement) just on the brake end to avoid melting the plastic under heavy braking. So that copper you are seeing may only be a few inches long...

On Fri, May 20, 2022 at 7:41 PM Robert Schmid <robert@...> wrote:
My rescue project looks like it has copper brake lines inside a nylon tube. Was that the standard?

I am planning to first pressure test my existing lines and see if they are corroded but I am wondering what others have done? Will the copper line even pull thru the nylon line inside the canard?

The wonders of buying a plane that sat outside too long ;-)

Robert
--
Robert "TheFrisco" Schmid
(408) 805-5450

www.facebook.com/TheFlyingFriscos
www.theflyingfriscos.com

Love building planes almost as much as flying. Latest completed build is "Loki", a Chinook Plus 2 bush plane.


Sam Hoskins
 

Taildragger or Tri-Q?

If it's a taildragger the current axle is supported at both ends by the wheel pants. To go to a cantilever axle mount would probably be quite a big challenge, I would think.

The Airheart brakes are completely adequate but they are no longer in production.

Sam

On Thu, May 26, 2022, 6:40 AM Edwin Medina <captmedina@...> wrote:
In my project I will like to upgrade the brakes, any one know if we can put something similar to Cessnas? Is it necessary to change the structure or alter it?


On Wed, May 25, 2022 at 21:53 Robert Cringely <bob@...> wrote:
Rutan standard was Nylaflo brake lines, sometimes with metal lines (or a metal reinforcement) just on the brake end to avoid melting the plastic under heavy braking. So that copper you are seeing may only be a few inches long...

On Fri, May 20, 2022 at 7:41 PM Robert Schmid <robert@...> wrote:
My rescue project looks like it has copper brake lines inside a nylon tube. Was that the standard?

I am planning to first pressure test my existing lines and see if they are corroded but I am wondering what others have done? Will the copper line even pull thru the nylon line inside the canard?

The wonders of buying a plane that sat outside too long ;-)

Robert
--
Robert "TheFrisco" Schmid
(408) 805-5450

www.facebook.com/TheFlyingFriscos
www.theflyingfriscos.com

Love building planes almost as much as flying. Latest completed build is "Loki", a Chinook Plus 2 bush plane.


Robert Cringely
 

“Upgrades,” especially eyeball-engineered upgrades, typically just add weight. Aim to make upgrades with a net weight loss (one up but two down) if you can. 

The less it weighs the less braking you need. My KR-1 had no brakes at all. I just replaced the tailwheel with a hardware store wire brush skid, which I saw first on a Druine Turbulent. 


On Thu, May 26, 2022 at 4:50 PM Sam Hoskins <sam.hoskins@...> wrote:
Taildragger or Tri-Q?

If it's a taildragger the current axle is supported at both ends by the wheel pants. To go to a cantilever axle mount would probably be quite a big challenge, I would think.

The Airheart brakes are completely adequate but they are no longer in production.

Sam

On Thu, May 26, 2022, 6:40 AM Edwin Medina <captmedina@...> wrote:
In my project I will like to upgrade the brakes, any one know if we can put something similar to Cessnas? Is it necessary to change the structure or alter it?


On Wed, May 25, 2022 at 21:53 Robert Cringely <bob@...> wrote:
Rutan standard was Nylaflo brake lines, sometimes with metal lines (or a metal reinforcement) just on the brake end to avoid melting the plastic under heavy braking. So that copper you are seeing may only be a few inches long...

On Fri, May 20, 2022 at 7:41 PM Robert Schmid <robert@...> wrote:
My rescue project looks like it has copper brake lines inside a nylon tube. Was that the standard?

I am planning to first pressure test my existing lines and see if they are corroded but I am wondering what others have done? Will the copper line even pull thru the nylon line inside the canard?

The wonders of buying a plane that sat outside too long ;-)

Robert
--
Robert "TheFrisco" Schmid
(408) 805-5450

www.facebook.com/TheFlyingFriscos
www.theflyingfriscos.com

Love building planes almost as much as flying. Latest completed build is "Loki", a Chinook Plus 2 bush plane.