Flight Report(s)


Jay Scheevel
 

After enjoying Peter’s Q2 and his hangar presentation yesterday on Zoom, I went out to fly my Q in the beautiful crisp clear blue fall sky here in western Colorado. The main focus of my flight was to put the remainder of my shot bag ballast in the plane and see how it responded with more aft cg. My shot bags are 50 pound bags of steel blasting beads and I have 3 of them for a total of 150 lb.. I have a cloth cover bag for each shot bag that has handles, so I can carry them and put them in the passenger seat one at a time and buckle them all in with the seat belt.

 

The flight was good. Took only slightly longer to get off the runway, and climbed out between 500 to 700 fpm at about 95 mph IAS.  I found that I did not lose much performance on the high end with my steely passenger on board, and the plane was very stable in pitch after trimming it for cruise flight. The only real noticeable change was I needed some left roll trim to stay level. I did a few practice approaches to my relatively short field, so I knew that I could get a nice landing and I did get a nice landing. So, that was a successful completion of the shot bag passenger program. As far as my passengers, they were very well behaved. Here is a very short video of one of my passes down the runway from yesterday (http://n8wq.scheevel.com/videos/IMG_0870.MOV ).

 

So…. I went out to the airport again today, since I had a little tinkering that I needed to do. I took the shot bags out of the plane to work in back of the seat a little and after this, I was putting in some more gas to go for a short flight when one of my airport friends, Jerry, who is a retired AI stopped by and expressed an interest in also being ballast (I realized that I have a lot of friends named Jerry!). Unlike one of my other friends named Jerry, this one is short and weighs only about 130 pounds, so we agreed he would be my first passenger.

 

Off we went. The air was a little warmer than yesterday (close to 60 deg. F) since it was early afternoon when we took off, so DA was about 5200 feet (field is 4750 MSL). Take off was about the same as yesterday and we climbed nicely at about 600 fpm at 95 IAS.  Went away from the field and did some air work. I gave him the plane and was surprised to find that he was not very stable in altitude (he has like 10,000 hours in all different small planes). I think it was because he is short and was sitting down in the plane a bit more than he is used to, so forward view tends to make you want to dive a little. I showed him how nicely it turns tight, which still impresses me, then we went back to the airport and did one test pass, and a second completed landing which turned out very nice, so I did not scare either one of us, which is a plus.

 

So another milestone passes for me…I have flown the first passenger in my Quickie! Now I will see if I can talk my wife into flying with me. She is the same size as Jerry who flew with me today.

 

Cheers,

Jay Scheevel  --Tri-Q2, 194 hours


Anthony P
 

Put 4 shot bags in there to see if she's ready for me.  :)

Glad your testing is progressing successfully.


Paul Fisher
 

Good job Jay!

During my early testing I used a sand bag that I named "Sandy".  Sandy went along with me for much of the first year I flew the plane.  She gave me much better control on the ground (more weight on the tailwheel).

Sometimes I miss her!

Paul

On Sun, Nov 14, 2021, 14:48 Jay Scheevel <jay@...> wrote:

After enjoying Peter’s Q2 and his hangar presentation yesterday on Zoom, I went out to fly my Q in the beautiful crisp clear blue fall sky here in western Colorado. The main focus of my flight was to put the remainder of my shot bag ballast in the plane and see how it responded with more aft cg. My shot bags are 50 pound bags of steel blasting beads and I have 3 of them for a total of 150 lb.. I have a cloth cover bag for each shot bag that has handles, so I can carry them and put them in the passenger seat one at a time and buckle them all in with the seat belt.

 

The flight was good. Took only slightly longer to get off the runway, and climbed out between 500 to 700 fpm at about 95 mph IAS.  I found that I did not lose much performance on the high end with my steely passenger on board, and the plane was very stable in pitch after trimming it for cruise flight. The only real noticeable change was I needed some left roll trim to stay level. I did a few practice approaches to my relatively short field, so I knew that I could get a nice landing and I did get a nice landing. So, that was a successful completion of the shot bag passenger program. As far as my passengers, they were very well behaved. Here is a very short video of one of my passes down the runway from yesterday (http://n8wq.scheevel.com/videos/IMG_0870.MOV ).

 

So…. I went out to the airport again today, since I had a little tinkering that I needed to do. I took the shot bags out of the plane to work in back of the seat a little and after this, I was putting in some more gas to go for a short flight when one of my airport friends, Jerry, who is a retired AI stopped by and expressed an interest in also being ballast (I realized that I have a lot of friends named Jerry!). Unlike one of my other friends named Jerry, this one is short and weighs only about 130 pounds, so we agreed he would be my first passenger.

 

Off we went. The air was a little warmer than yesterday (close to 60 deg. F) since it was early afternoon when we took off, so DA was about 5200 feet (field is 4750 MSL). Take off was about the same as yesterday and we climbed nicely at about 600 fpm at 95 IAS.  Went away from the field and did some air work. I gave him the plane and was surprised to find that he was not very stable in altitude (he has like 10,000 hours in all different small planes). I think it was because he is short and was sitting down in the plane a bit more than he is used to, so forward view tends to make you want to dive a little. I showed him how nicely it turns tight, which still impresses me, then we went back to the airport and did one test pass, and a second completed landing which turned out very nice, so I did not scare either one of us, which is a plus.

 

So another milestone passes for me…I have flown the first passenger in my Quickie! Now I will see if I can talk my wife into flying with me. She is the same size as Jerry who flew with me today.

 

Cheers,

Jay Scheevel  --Tri-Q2, 194 hours


Bruce Crain
 

Good for you Jay!  That extra horsepower is obviously working to your advantage at your altitude!
Bruce


On Nov 14, 2021, at 5:30 PM, Paul Fisher <rv7a.n18pf@...> wrote:


Good job Jay!

During my early testing I used a sand bag that I named "Sandy".  Sandy went along with me for much of the first year I flew the plane.  She gave me much better control on the ground (more weight on the tailwheel).

Sometimes I miss her!

Paul

On Sun, Nov 14, 2021, 14:48 Jay Scheevel <jay@...> wrote:

After enjoying Peter’s Q2 and his hangar presentation yesterday on Zoom, I went out to fly my Q in the beautiful crisp clear blue fall sky here in western Colorado. The main focus of my flight was to put the remainder of my shot bag ballast in the plane and see how it responded with more aft cg. My shot bags are 50 pound bags of steel blasting beads and I have 3 of them for a total of 150 lb.. I have a cloth cover bag for each shot bag that has handles, so I can carry them and put them in the passenger seat one at a time and buckle them all in with the seat belt.

 

The flight was good. Took only slightly longer to get off the runway, and climbed out between 500 to 700 fpm at about 95 mph IAS.  I found that I did not lose much performance on the high end with my steely passenger on board, and the plane was very stable in pitch after trimming it for cruise flight. The only real noticeable change was I needed some left roll trim to stay level. I did a few practice approaches to my relatively short field, so I knew that I could get a nice landing and I did get a nice landing. So, that was a successful completion of the shot bag passenger program. As far as my passengers, they were very well behaved. Here is a very short video of one of my passes down the runway from yesterday (http://n8wq.scheevel.com/videos/IMG_0870.MOV ).

 

So…. I went out to the airport again today, since I had a little tinkering that I needed to do. I took the shot bags out of the plane to work in back of the seat a little and after this, I was putting in some more gas to go for a short flight when one of my airport friends, Jerry, who is a retired AI stopped by and expressed an interest in also being ballast (I realized that I have a lot of friends named Jerry!). Unlike one of my other friends named Jerry, this one is short and weighs only about 130 pounds, so we agreed he would be my first passenger.

 

Off we went. The air was a little warmer than yesterday (close to 60 deg. F) since it was early afternoon when we took off, so DA was about 5200 feet (field is 4750 MSL). Take off was about the same as yesterday and we climbed nicely at about 600 fpm at 95 IAS.  Went away from the field and did some air work. I gave him the plane and was surprised to find that he was not very stable in altitude (he has like 10,000 hours in all different small planes). I think it was because he is short and was sitting down in the plane a bit more than he is used to, so forward view tends to make you want to dive a little. I showed him how nicely it turns tight, which still impresses me, then we went back to the airport and did one test pass, and a second completed landing which turned out very nice, so I did not scare either one of us, which is a plus.

 

So another milestone passes for me…I have flown the first passenger in my Quickie! Now I will see if I can talk my wife into flying with me. She is the same size as Jerry who flew with me today.

 

Cheers,

Jay Scheevel  --Tri-Q2, 194 hours